My first memory of a workshop is the old, cluttered and incredibly small place in my father's house, somewhere in Europe. My father and grandfather used the workshop to store their tools and to make things of metal. They both liked to cut, join, hammer and solder metal parts. They had all the heavy tools needed for that but there were almost no woodworking tools. Sure, there was a heavy duty table saw and a few chisels and saws, but not much else. The table saw was home made. It had a gigantic three phase 360V motor and a very large blade. The saw could cut all kinds of wood, but it was used almost exclusively for one purpose: my father and my grandfather would cut large logs into smaller pieces and then use the wood in the stove... I was fascinated by the saw, but it was the one tool that was strictly off limits for me. I guess my father was afraid I would loose my fingers. He was probably right.

As a young boy, I used to spend a lot of time in the workshop. The memories are fading now, but I remember doing many weird things with wood, steel and other materials, including some chemical ingredients...


Then I went to the university and forgot how much pleasure working with one's hands gives. Many winters have passed. Then a year ago I was sitting in front of a computer screen and had one of these rare moments. An epiphany of sorts. There I was, spending my life in front of a screen. You see, first I was a student so my life focused on books and computers. Then I started working in a library and not much changed, books and computers were there with me. I needed something different. I needed a change. I suddenly remembered the feeling of a tool working metal or wood. It all came back to me and I knew I wanted to start again. To give some more meaning to who I am.


A year has passed. I now have an almost fully equipped workshop in the basement of our house. Over the year I have read several dozen books on woodworking and discovered a fantastic world out there. I realized North America was a woodworking paradise. But this is a story for another tale...