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  • Fence design problems?

    e0b92666c151dd41de40824e9dac2460.jpg

    My design is this one below
    -4x4x6' or 4x4x8' posts
    -horizontal boards 1x6x8'
    -not sure if I need the reinforcing on the median segment in order to prevent the sagging
    -not sure if I need the cap board (5/4x6x8 decking)
    57jhF.png
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  • #2

    Re: Fence design problems?

    Only thing I can tell is that it is not pool legal in many areas. Too easy to climb.
    John
    If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

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    • #3

      Re: Fence design problems?

      No pool on my property or my neighbor's property
      Does this apply to decks as well only when pools are present ?

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      • #4

        Re: Fence design problems?

        In some places horizontal fence boards are against code. In the city fences like that are easy to climb so not great for keeping intruders out (or in, if they make it in)...may not be a concern but fence hoppers can steal bikes or ladders etc quite easily. The cap isn't necessary IMO (you can cap posts to protect the end grain from rain but I think the aesthetic is the most important thing), I'd leave it off. I'm also pretty sure that it will never sag.
        Frank
        SPCHT

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        • #5

          Re: Fence design problems?

          I would suggest using 6x6 posts. Much more sturdy and they won't twist near as much as the 4x4.
          Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

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          • #6

            Re: Fence design problems?

            Originally posted by jaywood1207
            I would suggest using 6x6 posts. Much more sturdy and they won't twist near as much as the 4x4.
            Agreed.

            Also, I think the most important point is how you intend on anchoring the posts in the ground.

            If you concrete to the top, it's likely to heave, unless you use sono tubes, which gets expensive.

            I usually drive 3" nails angled into the lower few inches of the post and pour a small concrete anchor under the frost line (the angled nails attach the anchor to the post) and back fill with dirt. Inexpensive and effective, imo.

            -Jeff

            Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

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            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Fence design problems?

              I was just referring to pools, but as Frank D mentioned some areas don’t allow horizontal fencing.
              John
              If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Fence design problems?

                Originally posted by PF4Wood View Post
                e0b92666c151dd41de40824e9dac2460.jpg

                My design is this one below
                -4x4x6' or 4x4x8' posts
                -horizontal boards 1x6x8'
                -not sure if I need the reinforcing on the median segment in order to prevent the sagging
                -not sure if I need the cap board (5/4x6x8 decking)
                57jhF.png
                If you are using 8 foot fence boards I would add the middle board.
                If you are using 5 or 6 foot then it would be okay.
                They wont sag but it will help against twisting and warping.

                The top cap helps protect the end grain of the posts but so will caps/brushing on a thick coat of end cote every year.

                I would personally go with 5 or 6 foot boards, I think it will look better.
                8 foot boards with a 2x4 in the idle looks too much like a skid ;)

                Lately Ive been installing fence posts like Ontario hydro installs hydro poles - dig below frost line, install post and fill around with crushed rock.
                No cement needed.

                No rough edges for frost to grab and push.


                Nathan
                PF4Wood likes this.

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                • #9

                  Re: Fence design problems?

                  Originally posted by jaywood1207 View Post
                  I would suggest using 6x6 posts. Much more sturdy and they won't twist near as much as the 4x4.
                  Even 4x6 roughsawn are significantly stronger & don't seem to twist & warp nearly as much as 4x4 posts. In AB, horizontal boards are no good for decks; nothing climbable is permitted.
                  Wally in Calgary likes this.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Fence design problems?

                    Originally posted by drzaius View Post

                    Even 4x6 roughsawn are significantly stronger & don't seem to twist & warp nearly as much as 4x4 posts. In AB, horizontal boards are no good for decks; nothing climbable is permitted.
                    Where can I find those (pressure treated and in yellowish finish AKA Sienna, not brown)
                    Horizontal rails by law: the most retarded by law I have seen. We are crippling the design of our constructions because some are unable to take care of their kids
                    There is always an idiot that goes through a crystal clear wall of glass or door. I have not seem them banned. Apply that to windows and see where we are getting with this....


                    in response to the to other replies: thanks guys!
                    How about heavy duty post spikes https://www.rona.ca/en/heavy-duty-sp...black-12665004 ?

                    Before you say anything you should know that I have used a smaller version of these spikes (not the heavy duty one) for two gates and a 8" fence panel and they did not move....after 3 years they are still in place despite of some saying that the sky and the fence will fall at the first wind.
                    As a matter of fact a large majority of the posts set in concrete are rotten and I am being forced to replace them
                    I can't still figure out what is causing this as some are rotten others are good. My neghbor's deck has most of the posts rotten, the cncrete is exposed and you can see the wood crack opened and rotting from inside. The fence has the concrete base under ground (smart guy covered the base with soil so you need to dig like 2-3in to get to the base) and these are rotten too ...

                    I am not using concrete and wood again! At most concrete --> metal support---> post

                    IMHO if you build a light fence, boxed design (vertical or horizonta) with the heavy duty posts should resist the strong winds
                    Many fences I have seen are very heavy and that requires super strong anchoring in ground or concrete
                    Last edited by PF4Wood; 05-09-2018, 02:13 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Fence design problems?

                      Originally posted by carbonBased View Post
                      Agreed.

                      Also, I think the most important point is how you intend on anchoring the posts in the ground.

                      If you concrete to the top, it's likely to heave, unless you use sono tubes, which gets expensive.

                      I usually drive 3" nails angled into the lower few inches of the post and pour a small concrete anchor under the frost line (the angled nails attach the anchor to the post) and back fill with dirt. Inexpensive and effective, imo.

                      -Jeff

                      Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
                      I don't think those nails will not rust to break or practically disappear

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Fence design problems?

                        Do not use spikes,
                        It will fail.

                        Nathan

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                        • #13

                          Re: Fence design problems?

                          Originally posted by nnieman View Post
                          Do not use spikes,
                          It will fail.

                          Nathan

                          Did you read my message or you stopped where I said "spikes" for the first time?

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Fence design problems?

                            I read it.

                            Ive seen lots of fences built with spikes.....

                            You got lucky :P

                            Honestly tho, you'd be lucky to get 5 to 10 years out of the fence.

                            Just dig your 4x4s down below the frost line (or get someone in to dig/drill them), pack around it with 3/4 crushed rock and you are good.

                            I'm a carpenter, Ive built thousands of feet of fences. I actually looked into buying a perfect posthole franchise at one point (I didn't, the guy wanted WAY too much money for a beat up tractor and a brand name).

                            Build it right. No spikes.

                            Nathan

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                            • #15

                              Re: Fence design problems?

                              Originally posted by PF4Wood View Post


                              Did you read my message or you stopped where I said "spikes" for the first time?
                              a gate and 8' run of fence is not the same as 20-30-80' of fence which is exposed to wind loads and the long lateral twisting between one end of the fence and the other as wind hits it.
                              a post buried in the ground is very ridged, but the metal spike can fatigue, bend, rust, etc and over time fail.
                              plus I have not seen a spike made for a 6x6, and as stated previously if a 6x6 is possible, go for it.
                              [insert something witty here]

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