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Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

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  • #16

    Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

    My buddy is a cop. He gets those tactical gloves from the cop shop that won't allow a knife to cut through. He just left here about 1/2 hour ago and was telling me those gloves worked great at his place in Palm desert for the cactus plants he had to trim. Never got stuck once. I have some here too. Trust me they work with metal duct as well and not too expensive if you have a friend on the job.
    Bill R. likes this.
    "Do it Right!"

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    • #17

      Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

      Ever since I nearly lost a couple of fingers to a sheet of storefront glazing these have been my go to work gloves https://www.uline.ca/BL_6604/Kevlar-...sistant-Gloves. They won't stop an axe blow but they protect well from cuts and slices. Kevlar wears well and they are washable so a box of 12 lasts years. I've found then cheaper at industrial supply houses.

      DIY gas furnace installation in Canada is barely worth discussing because even if the city would allow it you'll never find anyone to sell you a furnace and you'll never get a gas fitter to hook up a used one because it's illegal in Canada. Even if you get someone to install the furnace and the gas piping getting someone to fab up your ductwork for you to install might save you 5% if you're lucky ..... it's the easiest part of the job for a sheet metal guy and they are going to be sure to mark up enough to cover all the nuisance phone calls they are going get.
      Egon likes this.

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      • #18

        Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

        Check with your local building inspector.

        A design by an Engineer with heat loss calculations is often required.

        A heating contractor will have in house engineering or will work with a firm for that....Rod
        Work is the curse of the riding class.

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        • #19

          Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

          Ya that sounds like a fairly straight forward job. Mine was the same but 2/3 the size. Since you only have 4ft I would make a stand out of 2x4s or something to hold up the duct piece up as you try to slide it into the first one.

          you will want to install the round take-off pieces so that the ends overhang the duct a bit so you can reach around them to tape it up once the round duct is installed.

          As mentioned get good gloves haha. I have vice grips with wide flat jaws, they were great for bending the tin but you could just c clamps to hold straight pieces against the tin to act as a brake bender. Not sure what they're called... flutist pliers? They crimp the ends of round duct to make them smaller so they fit into another piece. I didn't like them that much as they made the end tapered and not as nice as a factory edge. Before my friend dropped them off I crimped a duct but wrapping a round piece of wood in duct tape,slid it into an end of the round duct and hammered in the crimps with a wide chisel. Took a while longet but made perfect crimps.

          Also buy 3m duct tape , I ran out and used home hardware stuff and it started peeling within a year.

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          • #20

            Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

            If you were in Edmonton, Sinclair Supply could make your duct work. Gas lines are actually pretty simple and so are heat calculations and layout plans. I know I could easily have those jobs done here but I am a renovation contractor and that may differ in your area. Renovation work ,which is what you will be doing, is different than New construction. Regardless, if you are able to, and choose to, DO NOT miss or eliminate any of the inspections required for your area. If I were in your shoes I'm not sure I would want to take it on. There is a lot to consider.
            "Do it Right!"

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            • #21

              Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

              [QUOTE=Rusty;n1221461 Gas lines are actually pretty simple and so are heat calculations and layout plans. [/QUOTE] Heating / cooling load calcs and air systems design are not rocket science but they aren't easy either. In Canada you need HRAI certification to submit these for permit. They are 2 separate courses, about a week of class time and $1500 each. If you have a technical / engineering background they aren't that difficult .... they are math heavy, simple math but a lot of it. Gone are the days of rule of thumb guesses or napkin calculations ..... the city wants to see your work in a format specified by HRAI.

              You can get software to do it but you still need to know what you're doing and it costs well into 4 figures. One of the guys who took the courses with me built a spreadsheet for his takeoffs. That was in the late 1980's, he did a design for me in 2007 and was still using the same spreadsheet. I paid him to do it rather than do it myself even though I'm qualified and it was for my own home because it's the type of thing that you have to do every day to be any good at.

              https://www.hrai.ca/hrai-training-co...n-calculations

              https://www.hrai.ca/hrai-training-co...-system-design
              Last edited by dave_k; 01-29-2019, 12:53 PM.

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              • #22

                Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                Dave You're quoting me again. That's OK but let me bring you back on topic. I don't know why you want to make it more complicated than it really is all the time. Here is what I said; "Gas lines are actually pretty simple and so are heat calculations and layout plans." BTW,,,, as you should know by now, I do this for a living.

                You personally could figure out what requirements you need for a gas line for instance very simply right off your computer. So could I but NO I WOULD NOT DO THAT, NOR DID I SAY I WOULD, OR EVEN SUGGEST SOMEONE ELSE DO IT THAT WAY! In a nutshell you add up all the BTU"s your appliances use in your house and ascertain how many more BTU's you will need to run a new furnace and calculate whether your supply would provide enough gas to do what you want and also what size Pipe your furnace will require to perform optimally. If you were running a couple of other gas appliances you might even be able to reduce the size of the pipe running to a gas range or a gas dryer for example to accommodate the new pipe size. TO GET MY ANSWERS I WOULD ASK MY GAS FITTER AND FOR A HEATING LAYOUT I WOULD ASK MY HEATING CONTRACTOR AND IN TURN I WOULD PAY BOTH OF THEM FOR THEIR SERVICES. Those contractors are qualified and no one should try to circumvent either one. If anyone could surmise that I was suggesting otherwise they are wrong!

                The capital letters are for emphasis only because my comments are meant to be important for the group.
                "Do it Right!"

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                • #23

                  Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                  You seem to be talking about gas piping??? What I wrote about was what was required to properly size a furnace and design ductwork, which you claimed were "actually pretty simple" .... nothing else.

                  I agree, gas piping is simple .... about the easiest part of installing a furnace but it still requires certification.

                  Read the NBC 9.33.5.1 and *.2 as well as 6.2.1.1 and *.4.

                  That lays out the Canadian building code requirements as well as the other standards you must meet to design and install a gas fired heating appliance and associated ductwork in Canada. These codes apply to new construction as well as renovations. Local codes may exceed these requirements.

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                  • #24

                    Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                    Originally posted by dave_k View Post
                    You seem to be talking about gas piping??? What I wrote about was what was required to properly size a furnace and design ductwork, which you claimed were "actually pretty simple" .... nothing else.For a heating layout i would ask my heating contractor.

                    I agree, gas piping is simple .... about the easiest part of installing a furnace but it still requires certification.

                    Read the NBC 9.33.5.1 and *.2 as well as 6.2.1.1 and *.4.
                    That lays out the Canadian building code requirements as well as the other standards you must meet to design and install a gas fired heating appliance and associated ductwork in Canada. These codes apply to new construction as well as renovations. Local codes may exceed these requirements.
                    You are very confused David. You quoted ME and one must assume that's what you are responding to.

                    For the record,,, here again is what you quoted; Quote,"Gas lines are actually pretty simple and so are heat calculations and layout plans." Unquote! First of all do you actually understand that gas lines are gas pipe? Secondly heat calculations and layout plans go hand in hand. They are all pretty simple if you use the people who do it every day,,,,,,as I suggested above.

                    Heat calculations are basically keyed on square footage and how many holes called windows and doors you have in your structure. Layout plans are also pretty simple when you understand you have to get the warm air from the heat source to a position relatively close to each window and door. The volumes of air that have to get to each location is the critical part that demands a bit of intelligence in that it dictates duct and pipe sizes. Add in some return air from a couple of convenient locations and voila you have a system. If I missed something just ask. Dare I leave out details of an exhaust vent without you trying to challenge or discredit me?

                    All too often in your response you tell us to refer to the NBC. I think we all know the code has a great deal of input. I'm just wondering if you could offer some input without referring us to the code book.
                    "Do it Right!"

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                    • #25

                      Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                      Originally posted by pgausden View Post
                      Thanks for all your feedback. I don't think I was clear in my original post. I'm not installing the furnace my self. I am just doing the ductwork. The house is 1000sqft and mainly open concept except for 3 small bedrooms and 1 bathroom. This was a cottage that was lifted and installed on a foundation with a 4 foot crawl space. Nothing too complicated on the heating runs. Straight trunk from end to end with straight branch lines likely 5 to each side. 10 in total.
                      Guys read the above quote from the op.
                      Hes not running gas lines or installing the furnace.
                      Hes talking about duct work.

                      pgausden the local heating supply stores might do the calculations for you.
                      Its probably not going to be free.
                      They might give you a break on the price if you buy the duct from them (definitely a cheaper option then buying it from home depot/ home hardware etc

                      You're furnace installer probably has a better idea of who could provide it as well.

                      Whats your location?
                      You can maybe get more specific recommendations if you post a rough idea of your location.

                      Definitely go with the gloves, that stuff is sharp.
                      I cut my finger to the bone last week making a dust boot fit my shaper.

                      Nathan

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                      • #26

                        Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                        Thank you Nathan. I mentioned I can buy duct from Sinclair Supply here but I don't know if they have a shop where the OP is. Certainly there are others. Whether you can get a heat run layout or not from a local company is a good question but I bet you could and in the OP's case if he is having ABC install a furnace for him I bet they would do a layout and calculation for him too.
                        "Do it Right!"

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                        • #27

                          Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                          Input is fine if it’s Qualified Input that adheres to the codes.

                          I have installed ( some years ago ) gas furnaces and garage heaters including utility company hook ups and duct work. Inspection was a little different then as well as codes.
                          At work I have done small pipe/tubing fitting and watched much larger and heavier series rating pipe work.I have no qualifications.
                          Perhaps I should mention that even the small piping/tubing connections have specific details on assembly. ( torque on the nuts, length of thread and so on. )
                          No way in today’s world would I offer advice in areas that require certified installation. Cause maybe I don’t know what I don’t know!

                          Last edited by Egon; 01-30-2019, 09:01 AM.
                          Egon
                          from
                          The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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                          • #28

                            Re: Typical Dimensions of a Gas furnance

                            One day in Edmonton in 1981 I hooked up 14 gas lines to furnaces in the houses I had been building on the south side and half a dozen more on the north side. The furnaces were in the basements hanging from the floor joists above. I had been waiting for the gas lines and meters to be installed by Northwestern Utilities so we could have heat in the houses to finish the interiors through the winter which generally arrives mid October if not sooner in Alberta.

                            Typically I would use a SS flexible gas line which was yellow in colour. They were temporary. Then I would fire up all the furnaces. If I had any problems I knew how to shut down a meter in a hurry without turning off any valves. I'm not sure if anyone would be allowed to do that today. I was not unique though. We all did it back then because we knew what we were doing and had been trained to deal with gas lines and startups etc.

                            However I do agree with Egon's comments above. That's exactly why I suggested to consult the people who do it every day and that no one should circumvent any of the procedures.
                            "Do it Right!"

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