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  • 22 1/2 centers?

    Im getting set to sheet the inside of my shop so I started measuring for materials. Come to discover the studs are on 22 1/2 centers. Ive never run across this before. Definitely going to mess with layout.


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  • #2

    Re: 22 1/2 centers?

    How old is the building? 24 oc used to be very common, and is still common in certain applications. 22 1/2 would, of course, be the space between 24" centres.

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    • #3

      Re: 22 1/2 centers?

      Probably 30 years old or so.
      Its definitely 22 1/2 center to center.


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      • #4

        Re: 22 1/2 centers?

        Innovation which didn't catch on.
        Noel

        "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
        'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
        "

        John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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        • #5

          Re: 22 1/2 centers?

          What are you sheathing it with?

          If you were to go with T1-11 like I did in my shop, this would not be an issue provided the walls are decently plumb.
          Kevin

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          • #6

            Re: 22 1/2 centers?

            Originally posted by DavidR8 View Post
            Probably 30 years old or so.
            Its definitely 22 1/2 center to center.


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            Someone measuring 24" centres who didn't understand what "centre" is ?? You can get 22-1/2" OC by measuring outside to outside of a typical 2x4?
            callee likes this.

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            • #7

              Re: 22 1/2 centers?

              Originally posted by DavidR8 View Post
              Im getting set to sheet the inside of my shop so I started measuring for materials. Come to discover the studs are on 22 1/2 centers. Ive never run across this before. Definitely going to mess with layout.


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              Get some cheap strapping and strap it horizontal. It will make it easy to sheet with anything.

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              • #8

                Re: 22 1/2 centers?

                Horizontal strapping allows you to place your screws away from the edge of the sheet and bowed, twisted, or out of plumb studs are no longer an issue. In my basement storage room, I installed the sheets vertically, kept the screws out of the recessed edge and taped only the screws. No butt joints, less work, less mess and looks good.

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                • #9

                  Re: 22 1/2 centers?

                  Originally posted by Lost in the Woods View Post
                  What are you sheathing it with?

                  If you were to go with T1-11 like I did in my shop, this would not be an issue provided the walls are decently plumb.
                  Interesting idea. Is it not an issue because of the overlap at the edges?


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                  • #10

                    Re: 22 1/2 centers?

                    Originally posted by DavidR8 View Post

                    Interesting idea. Is it not an issue because of the overlap at the edges?


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                    It shouldn't be if the walls are fairly plumb. Even if they are, you can just place some horizontal supports between the studs likely and get the laps of the edges of the T1-11 siding to seal together well enough or shim up the face of the studs where really necessary. There is very little voids in this stuff, if any.

                    This is what Russell Morash had on the walls of his shop that Norm Abrahm's shot NYW out of. That's where I got the idea.

                    It's great because you can pretty well screw anything anywhere and old screw holes disappear with wood filer. I used a belt sander to remove the fuzzy burr face of the panels to help prevent excess dust to accumulate on the face of them. Each board takes just a couple of minutes to de-burr their faces before installing.

                    Gives a nice natural look to the shop and you don't see seams between panels because of the lap edging of the T1-11 like you do with using ply type woods or OSB instead. You also don't have to do all the work that drywall has involved also.

                    I plan to do the same thing with my shed/satellite shop for its interior walls when I'm ready to clad its insides as well. You can bang into them with errant boards and whatnot and they don't deface or look all banged up like drywall or other alternatives would end up looking over time. Especially in a place like a shop.

                    I believe I paid $55 a sheet for mine when I did my first shop's inside about 17 years ago buying it at HD. Last time I looked, I couldn't find it at HD, but I see that Peacock's near me has it, but they call it Chalet Siding at $60 a sheet for the 5/8ths thick one which is what I used.

                    It's exterior grade and IS mostly used to clad the outside of accessory buildings people build and subsequently paint. I wouldn't paint it if used for an interior shop application for some of the inherent benefits as I've outlined.

                    https://www.peacocklumber.ca/pricing-plywood-2

                    Here are some random pics from years ago when I was first putting my shop together of what it looks like. You might notice that my studs didn't line up either.

                    Picture 164.jpgShop Shots II - Drill Press with Waste Tray and Vac.jpgShop Shots II - DC Far View.jpgShop Shots II - Full Shop View.jpgShop Shots II -Cover on Lathe Folded to Table Position.jpgPicture 164.jpg
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Lost in the Woods; 05-10-2020, 08:03 AM.
                    DavidR8 likes this.
                    Kevin

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                    • #11

                      Re: 22 1/2 centers?

                      Originally posted by Lost in the Woods View Post

                      It shouldn't be if the walls are fairly plumb. Even if they are, you can just place some horizontal supports between the studs likely and get the laps of the edges of the T1-11 siding to seal together well enough or shim up the face of the studs where really necessary. There is very little voids in this stuff, if any.

                      This is what Russell Morash had on the walls of his shop that Norm Abrahm's shot NYW out of. That's where I got the idea.

                      It's great because you can pretty well screw anything anywhere and old screw holes disappear with wood filer. I used a belt sander to remove the fuzzy burr face of the panels to help prevent excess dust to accumulate on the face of them. Each board takes just a couple of minutes to de-burr their faces before installing.

                      Gives a nice natural look to the shop and you don't see seams between panels because of the lap edging of the T1-11 like you do with using ply type woods or OSB instead. You also don't have to do all the work that drywall has involved also.

                      I plan to do the same thing with my shed/satellite shop for its interior walls when I'm ready to clad its insides as well. You can bang into them with errant boards and whatnot and they don't deface or look all banged up like drywall or other alternatives would end up looking over time. Especially in a place like a shop.

                      I believe I paid $55 a sheet for mine when I did my first shop's inside about 17 years ago buying it at HD. Last time I looked, I couldn't find it at HD, but I see that Peacock's near me has it, but they call it Chalet Siding at $60 a sheet for the 5/8ths thick one which is what I used.

                      It's exterior grade and IS mostly used to clad the outside of accessory buildings people build and subsequently paint. I wouldn't paint it if used for an interior shop application for some of the inherent benefits as I've outlined.

                      https://www.peacocklumber.ca/pricing-plywood-2

                      Here are some random pics from years ago when I was first putting my shop together of what it looks like. You might notice that my studs didn't line up either.

                      Picture 164.jpgShop Shots II - Drill Press with Waste Tray and Vac.jpgShop Shots II - DC Far View.jpgShop Shots II - Full Shop View.jpgShop Shots II -Cover on Lathe Folded to Table Position.jpgPicture 164.jpg
                      Originally I thought T1-11 as the OSB type which I wasnt terribly interested in doing.

                      Thanks for the pics and memory jog on the chateau siding. My local lumber yard carries a similar product. I think thats what Im going to use.


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