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  • Wooden Walls

    Hi I have some basement walls that used to be covered in nice paneling and it was taken down.  No I have some other panel on some of the places, and my intent is now to take it all off again.  Then I would like to replace all the panel with hardwood boards probably just side by side in a horizontal layout. 

    So my question(s) here will be:
    1. Do I need to make interlocking boards (tongue and groove / rabbited cuts)
    2. What thickness should be used for this job? 
    3.  I think nailing the boards onto the studs is the plan, but what is the strategy to hide the nails for something like this?  I don't want all the nail heads visible.

    Thank you, and if you can think of anything I might be overlooking for a job like this, please let me know as well!
     
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  • #2

    Re: Wooden Walls

    Tongue and groove, any thickness from 4/4 down to 5/16 will work.
    Wood Grower likes this.

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    • #3

      Re: Wooden Walls

      If you use tongue and groove, you can nail it on the tongue on a 45°angle like hardwood flooring to hide the nails.
      Glenn McCarron and Wood Grower like this.

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      • #4

        Re: Wooden Walls

        I would think you could use any wood flooring material using the same techniques as installing flooring. Be sure the wood is dry and acclimatized to where it is going.
        Wood Grower likes this.
        Bob just past Ayr

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        • #5

          Re: Wooden Walls

          Originally posted by Bob just past Ayr View Post
          I would think you could use any wood flooring material using the same techniques as installing flooring. Be sure the wood is dry and acclimatized to where it is going.
          Yes I have boards but not flooring. My idea is to process wood into walls. So I will have to group similar sizes of wood to work to final size. If I have an uneven division maybe I could stick walnut in the middle as a visual line or something to that effect. Yes I suppose I’ll have to process then bring in and allow it acclimate a while then install the material.

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          • #6

            Re: Wooden Walls

            Originally posted by Scott Walsh View Post
            If you use tongue and groove, you can nail it on the tongue on a 45°angle like hardwood flooring to hide the nails.
            I like this hidden nail idea. Great idea. That will save a lot of extras to conceal the nails.

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            • #7

              Re: Wooden Walls

              Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
              Tongue and groove, any thickness from 4/4 down to 5/16 will work.
              Ok great. I will just have to pick and go I guess. 5/16 might be a bit thin for my liking but maybe suitable for install over drywall. I had been thinking 3/4 might be where I am going.

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              • #8

                Re: Wooden Walls

                Originally posted by RV Sam View Post
                Tongue and groove, any thickness from 4/4 down to 5/16 will work.
                If using this tongue and groove method, would you advise the end of the board processed as well if the pieces aren't long enough to go the distance? I suppose the beginning and end of the wall run wouldn't require tongue and groove as it would be right up to a corner? Thank you.

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                • #9

                  Re: Wooden Walls

                  Originally posted by Wood Grower View Post

                  If using this tongue and groove method, would you advise the end of the board processed as well if the pieces aren't long enough to go the distance? I suppose the beginning and end of the wall run wouldn't require tongue and groove as it would be right up to a corner? Thank you.
                  If possible yes for sure as any cupping will stand out . If you decide to do this be sure to machine ends first.
                  Wood Grower likes this.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Wooden Walls

                    If you have to piece to get the length, ensure the ends are nicely milled so they butt well unless you are going to cover the joints with a vertical strip as an accent. Else, make the joints end up in random places on the wall so they minimize becoming an "eye-puller".

                    A T&G wall is incredibly secure even with small fasteners since there are so many fastening points aided by the interlocking. I have 3/4 cedar T& G on an external gable end of my garage that is held with 1-1/4", #18 skinny brads that are driven at an angle as described above and hidden by the following board. The brad holes aren't that visible even if not hidden. It is not uncommon to find 2 fasteners in each location spaced by about 1/2" or so. If the brads seem marginal, you can use larger nails every so many boards and the T&G interlocking will spread this extra strength throughout the wall. While my old siding is 3/4", 5/8 is common these days.

                    If all else fails, just put a very low wattage bulb in the room so nobody can see the mistakes .

                    billh
                    Last edited by billh; 09-30-2020, 01:38 PM.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Wooden Walls

                      Originally posted by billh View Post
                      If you have to piece to get the length, ensure the ends are nicely milled so they butt well unless you are going to cover the joints with a vertical strip as an accent. Else, make the joints end up in random places on the wall so they minimize becoming an "eye-puller".

                      A T&G wall is incredibly secure even with small fasteners since there are so many fastening points aided by the interlocking. I have 3/4 cedar T& G on an external gable end of my garage that is held with 1-1/4", #18 skinny brads that are driven at an angle as described above and hidden by the following board. The brad holes aren't that visible even if not hidden. It is not uncommon to find 2 fasteners in each location spaced by about 1/2" or so. If the brads seem marginal, you can use larger nails every so many boards and the T&G interlocking will spread this extra strength throughout the wall. While my old siding is 3/4", 5/8 is common these days.

                      If all else fails, just put a very low wattage bulb in the room so nobody can see the mistakes .

                      billh
                      I suspect this random length won't be much an issue for me as I kind of have a pile of wood with random lengths.

                      One other thing I should bring up, does it matter if wood types are mixed on the wall? I suspect I'll have several types of wood required to give me the total coverage from the wood I have available. I want to use up what I have before having to think about more wood. I am sort of even wondering if I should go lighter wood most of the wall with a different colour or different say heartwood of the same kind of wood used to make a line around waist height - light switch height sort of thing.... That has to remain to be seen, I have to select out the boards for working on first I guess. I do kind of think this first wall I will do will be a bathroom, and I need to do the outer wall then rip off panel on the inner wall and do that next. I'll have to probably make up some trim as well to finish off. I don't expect I would be using any softwood varieties, only from hardwood varieties.

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