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  • Wood Grower
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve in Ayr View Post
    Could somebody explain the rationale for requiring graded lumber to hold up drywall and paint.
    If you used wood full of unstable knots or punky wood you could tap the wall and destroy it. Hence why the grading so the wood isn’t below this minimum standard. Now if you use ungraded wood over the studs that probably is fine so a board might fall off but the wall won’t fall over.

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  • Jerome
    replied
    If you see some of the people that come into our lumber yard you would understand why they have to use graded lumber.

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  • Bill R.
    replied
    For years and maybe still is framing ( graded ) lumber was allowed 10% utility grade . I'm not against standards but it doesn't take a rocket scientist to know the difference between a good piece of structurally sound lumber and one that isn't.

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  • Jerome
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve in Ayr View Post
    Could somebody explain the rationale for requiring graded lumber to hold up drywall and paint.
    While you may be only holding up drywall and paint the next person who owned the house may need something stronger for support. You say that the lumber you have is ok but I may want to use crap if I was to do it by the Building code specifying graded lumber at least we have a known minimum standard.

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  • Brian @ Muir
    replied
    We are very lucky in my area as we have some great local contractors. The last kitchen I did in Norwich was a new build. I spoke to builder as it was being framed and they installed a ribbon of 2x4 for the upper and base cabinets. Sure avoids looking for studs. Did a kitchen a few years back on new construction where the builder, as a matter of course , had 1/2 inch plywood behind Kitchen,closet and bathroom walls. This was done solely to assist with the installation of cabinets, closet rods etc. This builder also painted the floor sheathing as he claimed it helped in controlling dust when the homeowner took possession.

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by beachburl View Post
    What thickness, John?
    I'm not a building expert, but personally I'd probably be happy with 1/2" as a minimum. When we installed cabinets that we built during my two years in a cabinet shop, we installed them into the coarse screw-in drywall anchors that are available at any hardware store. That would only be in addition to finding a stud, OR if we couldn't get to a stud. Most of what we did was gov't installs, estimated for a five year life span. Given how much those anchors into frywall could hold, I would think that 1/2 ply would be more than enough.

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  • beachburl
    replied
    What thickness, John?

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by Inspector Ron View Post
    The lighter version should be plenty strong enough for a residential application. (Unless you know you are going to say attach wall cabinets to hold very heavy items. even then you could reduce the stud spacing)
    This is a good reason to spec plywood under drywall in new construction kitchens and bathrooms and any other room that you may be attaching heavy objects to.

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  • Brian @ Muir
    replied
    My intro to steel was working with a friend that does commercial interiors. On that job it was 14 ft ceilings in a strip mall and he added two rows of stiffener channels. They were 25 gauge studs separating two businesses in a strip mall and were done with a building permitThese Stiffeners slide into a knock out on the steel studs. They add rigidity to the wall and spread any stress across the face of the wall. I have hung many cabinets from steel studs in office environments. When attaching cabinets to steel studs I use a toggle type fastener called Toggler and place them right into thr flange of the stud and they were 25 gauge studs. If you are concerned about strength you can always go with a 20 gauge and they will give you a wall that you can hang anything from. I always line any door or window openings with 2x lumber just to make it easier to trim.

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  • Inspector Ron
    replied
    Steel studs come in different weights. (Thicker webs and flanges) Commercial projects usually use the heavier version, even if the wall is not loadbearing, because it may not be known at the time of construction what will be attached to the finished wall. For example, shelving in a retail store. Where the walls are loadbearing an engineer would specify the studs to be used in a commercial building. These heavier studs are not a typical item at a lumber yard. The lighter version should be plenty strong enough for a residential application. (Unless you know you are going to say attach wall cabinets to hold very heavy items. even then you could reduce the stud spacing)

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  • Bob just past Ayr
    replied
    Jacques No problem I am aware that everything has its pros and cons. We need look at both all sides.

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  • Jacques Gagnon
    replied
    Originally posted by Sawdust View Post
    whats the limit on weight hanging on steel studs. One commercial job had to be rebuilt by their car painter after they said the wall could not support my cabinets.
    ...We had a similar question voiced during a Murphy Bed construction seminar at LV. The ability of such a wall (steel studs) to provide sufficient fastening strength was questioned. Not sure if an answer from a credible source exists; I have not done the research.

    Sorry Bob for taking the the conversation on a tangent.

    Regards,

    J.

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  • Bob just past Ayr
    replied
    I have not thought of steel studs. I will look into them next week Thanks Brian

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  • Sawdust
    replied
    whats the limit on weight hanging on steel studs. One commercial job had to be rebuilt by their car painter after they said the wall could not support my cabinets.

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  • Brian @ Muir
    replied
    I started using steel studs about 20 years ago. I find them much easier to work with and your walls are also straight which makes it a whole lot easier when applying trim. For applying trim their are trim screws with a much smaller head and not much harder to fill than a 16 gauge pin. There is a subdivision of high end homes around the Mike Weir Golf course in Sarnia. I know that some of those homes have interior walls, non load bearing , that are steel studs. I haven’t price steel studs in a year but suspect they are cheaper than current price of lumber

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