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Led Pot lights... still count individual lamps to total max 12?

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  • billh
    replied
    What is the definition of "connected" load? Hardwired or I just know how many watts a bulb/device is?

    I agree that LEDs are proven and are probably the best technology available today. From a consumer viewpoint, I don't think the problem was the mercury but the fact that their electronics was unreliable, they took time to get up to rated light output, weren't dimmable and looked weird.

    billh

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  • drzaius
    replied
    Originally posted by stevem View Post
    according to an electrician friend of mine, here in ontario you still cannot have more than 12 fixtures on a circuit regardless of the type

    his speculation was that you could replace the led fixture with a regular fixture quite easily, raising the current draw of the circuit

    omho, led are still unproven, years ago everybody thought compact flourescents(curlies) would be the way of the future and they would last forever, that didnt last long!!
    Straight from the horse's mouth, from the CEC2018, Part 1:
    8-304 Maximum number of outlets per circuit
    3) Where the connected load is known, the number of outlets shall be permitted to exceed 12,
    provided that the load current does not exceed 80% of the rating of the overcurrent device
    protecting the circuit.


    The Ontario Electrical Safety Code consists of the CEC 2018 Part 1 along with Ontario amendments. There are no amendments to Rule 8-304. Perhaps that was just that electrician's opinion.

    LEDs are indeed highly proven. That doesn't mean that they won't be replaced in the future when something better comes along. Much research into alternative lighting technologies is being carried on now. CF lamps were a huge improvement over incandescents, there was always the issue of mercury, which was one of the reasons LEDs have been adopted so quickly. At the time, they were the way of the future, but no one knowledgeable in the industry suggested they would last forever (again, mercury).

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  • stevem
    replied
    according to an electrician friend of mine, here in ontario you still cannot have more than 12 fixtures on a circuit regardless of the type

    his speculation was that you could replace the led fixture with a regular fixture quite easily, raising the current draw of the circuit

    omho, led are still unproven, years ago everybody thought compact flourescents(curlies) would be the way of the future and they would last forever, that didnt last long!!

    Leave a comment:


  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by beachburl View Post
    Astounding advancement.
    Now one has to determine when to rip out and replace for over all savings.
    For most of us in Canada we heat our homes much of the year that is short on daylight anyway so the saving is not as important as it may appear. My electricity cost is 4.3 cents/kwh so it is less of a factor for me than some other provinces.

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  • beachburl
    replied
    Astounding advancement.
    Now one has to determine when to rip out and replace for over all savings.

    Leave a comment:


  • drzaius
    replied
    Originally posted by bender View Post
    I'm working building a builder's sales office right now. The electrician told me that there's about 100 pot lights, all 10 watt led. 1000 watts all in. Less than a toaster. It's amazing.
    That it is. And a 10W pot puts out a lot of light. In real world installations, LED lighting takes about 1/10th the power of incandescent and about half that of fluorescent.

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  • bender
    replied
    I'm working building a builder's sales office right now. The electrician told me that there's about 100 pot lights, all 10 watt led. 1000 watts all in. Less than a toaster. It's amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • drzaius
    replied
    Originally posted by EFZauner View Post
    would be something like this https://en.lumenco.ca/bazz-333law.html a "led" fixture with replaceable GU10 LED bulb. Not sure what category this would be in. Can the bulb be replaced by a halogen? I think that the GU10 pin base is standard and can fit GU10 halogens also...
    If the lamp can be replaced by anything other than the OEM lamp, then you're limited to 12/cct. If it takes a GU10, then it could be replaced with a halogen lamp.

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  • EFZauner
    replied
    would be something like this https://en.lumenco.ca/bazz-333law.html a "led" fixture with replaceable GU10 LED bulb. Not sure what category this would be in. Can the bulb be replaced by a halogen? I think that the GU10 pin base is standard and can fit GU10 halogens also...

    Leave a comment:


  • drzaius
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
    Just out of interest are these special LED fixtures rather than LED bulbs in regular pot lights?
    This is only for recessed LED fixtures that have a fixed, built in LED source. Screw socket pots still must be limited to 12/cct because higher wattage lamps could be installed in them.

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Just out of interest are these special LED fixtures rather than LED bulbs in regular pot lights?

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  • EFZauner
    replied
    Originally posted by drzaius View Post
    LED pots do not have the number of fixtures per circuit restricted by code beyond the requirement that the total load does not exceed the circuit capacity.
    thank you!

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  • drzaius
    replied
    LED pots do not have the number of fixtures per circuit restricted by code beyond the requirement that the total load does not exceed the circuit capacity.

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  • billh
    replied
    While the number of fixtures/receptacles on a single circuit makes a degree of sense, it is somewhat outdated by modern electrical living where there are numerous very low and low current devices like phone chargers, LED lights, in use.
    billh

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Originally posted by Inspector Ron View Post
    Sorry, should have tried to answer the question.

    There isn't a restriction on the number of pot lights (or any other lights) if the total energy use for the house complies with the code.

    As mentioned, BC has additional energy use requirements not included in the body of the code. Might be something similar for Quebec?
    I think the point was the CEC restrictions on the number of fixtures on a single circuit?

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