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Painting less than smooth walls: question for airless sprayer users

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  • Sawdust
    replied
    did a whole house years back and non of my pro spray stuff is right to spray that type of paint. Some of the water based stuff (water based primers) will will spray reduced and level out beautifully with conventional gear but there would be too much overspray. Ive never used house painting gear but suspect it produces way less overspray and is designed to work with those thick paints.

    Sanded every room and ceiling with a 6" dynabrade and leveled out about 70 percent of the orange peel or more, by the time a home is 40 plus years old there is substantial build and peel from past owners. Plus if any smokers in there which there were felt like I was knocking that off.

    I rolled two wet coats, it looked great even after the first Coat. The deal was Aura you dont need to use primer that it is self priming. In time stuff telegraphed through, zero chance id use it that way again. Make sure you find and use the best primer for the features they have adhesion and blocking and and.

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  • Bob just past Ayr
    replied
    I get all my paint from these guys in Brantford and am very pleased with the advise I get. http://colourshoppeinc.com/index.html

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  • bender
    replied
    The BM ceiling paint in the yellow can is the best for hiding imperfections and covers well too. It's worth paying extra for.

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  • billsm
    replied
    As someone with limited experience and generally hates interior painting, applying a few skim coats is not that hard. Try it out on a small wall first and work on your technique. It dries quickly and sands easily. If you can tape and mud a drywall joint even poorly then skim coating is a breeze. Lots of drop cloths is a must.

    Bill

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  • Paul O in Paris
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

    Probably NOT what you wanted to hear ... sorry...
    IMO a person should never feel "sorry" for giving good, experience based advice John! I was definitely going in the wrong direction and needed a major adjustment to my thinking. I have very little experience with real paint so needed to know these things.

    Thanks also to everyone else who advised that a roller was the better way to go and to skim coat.
    I have several microfibre 0.5" sleeves and a 0.75", maybe 1" too. I'll use a 0.75 on the ceiling and depending how much orange peel I get with the first coat of primer I may use it on the walls too.
    I do realise that I won't cover up the all irregularities by just rolling on some heavy bodied primer and will have to do a fair bit of repair work. I looked into skim coating and will give it a try too. Plenty of methods available, one guy rolled on the mud then used a squeegee type trowel to remove the excess. Like I said I have never done this before but IMO it never hurts to add a new technique to one's repertoire, even at my age. Seems there will be a lot of sanding in my immediate future!

    I have access to two sources of paint, a local Benjamin Moore (the owner lives on the next road to me and will drop off any orders on her way home) and a Pittsburgh Paint/Sicco distributor (which is also where I get my MLC finishing supplies etc). Does anybody have any recommendations for primer and paint from either of these? I have some BM Ultra Spec 500 as well as Sicco Go Primer. For paint, I usually get eggshell sheen, but will use flat if it will help mute what I can't repair.

    Paul
    Last edited by Paul O in Paris; 01-24-2021, 11:22 AM.

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  • Tim W C
    replied
    We use a Grace 495 pro airless. Any sprayed finish will show more, not less, of the imperfections. If a wall is a bit rough, we’d skim coat it by mixing some wet mud in 5 gallon pail, rolling it on with a rough texture nap roller and trowelling it off. It goes pretty quick, but we also have a Festool planex that makes quick and clean work of the sanding, which is otherwise the real chore. Short of that, I suppose we’d spray on a heavier primer like SW cover max and back roll with a 13mm nap roller. I’d also top coat it with flat, not satin, and definitely not eggshell.
    Tim

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  • Leo Van Der Loo
    replied
    Paul I think you are asking paint to flatten the rough wall, I don't think that's going to work, now if you could lay the wall horizontally ------------

    Having the paint go thick in the low spots and not on the high ones will just not happen IMO, put or have a skim coat put on the walls would be the best way to go I think, just IMO.

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  • Wally in Calgary
    replied
    Paul -- A few years ago I had to renovate the basement apartment here and used my Titan spryer for most of it. I laid it on thick and my wife went behind me and back rolled. This is a 70 yr. old house and has had many paint jobs but it turned out quite good doing it this way. Use a good latex that has lots of body and coverage. FWIW JMHO.

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  • drzaius
    replied
    Rolling will definitely hide flaws better than spraying. Skim coating is not really that hard to DIY. Check out a few youtubes & with a little practice you should be able to do a decent job.

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    I own one of these Campbell airless units (see picture). My experience is with painting pebbledash on exterior house stucco, OSB on the exterior of a garage and concrete block walls on the interior of a house basement. I don't remember the name of the paints I used, but it was WB exterior, probably from Home Depot fifteen years ago (probably Behr).

    My experience was that like any other spray you have to be moving before the paint starts to move and you have to keep moving after releasing the trigger or you get thick applications and runs at start and finish. Because you should use a viscosity gauge to get the paint to the correct viscosity for spraying to get an even spray, you will find yourself thinning and this leads to doing multiple coats t get a decent finish .... however ... that also means that the paint follows ALL the profiles of the surface, so if you have brush marks before the spray application, yo will have them after.

    Probably NOT what you wanted to hear ... sorry...

    cheers

    John

    CH-Airless.jpeg

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  • bender
    replied
    I'd say that a thick roller gives texture to the surface and is better at hiding imperfections. With spray you get a smoother finish that accentuates imperfections.

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  • Brian @ Muir
    replied
    Something Tim had mentioned to me was to have a roller handy for the first few times you use one. Helps make the runs disappear.

    Brian

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  • Painting less than smooth walls: question for airless sprayer users

    Just to clarify, I am asking about the units that have a pump, pick-up wand and about 25 or 50ft of hose with a spray gun at the end, not the all in one units that just plug into the wall.
    I am starting on redecorating the whole house and the walls and ceilings are far from smooth or even. Many have very shoddy drywall joins as well as deep brush marks in the primer. The ceiling/wall join is often really uneven too. It also seems that about half the drywall screws are showing, or at least the filler in them has either shrunk to give a depression or expanded to give a bump. These irregularities were all concealed by garish wallpaper and popcorn ceilings. Not the look we want to keep.
    I can patch most of the major irregularities but can't do much about the brush marks. I would prefer not to have to try sanding them out or getting someone in to skim coat them all as it's a big house, so I am wondering if the airless would supply a sufficiently thick coat of paint/primer to fill/hide them. I have found that a roller doesn't do this unless I go to one of those designed for a heavily textured look, and we don't want this.
    If there are any other suggestions that have worked well in similar situations, I would appreciate the input. Also a type/brand of paint that might help?

    Thanks
    Paul

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