Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

    I'm planning to build a built-in bookcase with cabinets at the base into an 8'x8' recess. The 3 cabinets will be something like 30" high and deeper than the shelves. Another 3 corresponding columns of adjustable shelves that reach the ceiling would sit on top of the cabinets.

    I've looked at many free designs on the net and I want to check with the experienced cabinet builders here about the soundness of my design.

    I'm trying to keep the design as simple and cheap as possible and have decided to construct 6 boxes. Three boxes are for the shelves and 3 are for the cabinets. I have a basic table saw but I'm not interested in ripping 4'x8' sheets of material. I want to use my 7 1/4" circular saw with a homemade T-square for cross-cuts.

    Home Depot sells 5/8" x 12" x 96" particle board with the peg holes already drilled. I don't feel like drilling a thousand holes either. For the shelves I would use 5/8" particle board as well. I noticed that a lot of plans call for 3/4" which I did not see at HD.

    A lot of plans on the web call for rabbets and dadoes. I would like to use rabbets on the tops and bottoms of the side pieces, but leave all of the shelves otherwise adjustable.

    All boxes would be trimmed with 1"x2" MDF. To assemble everything I would use strips of wood between the sides of the boxes and screw them together. The strips of wood would make the 1"x2" trim fit properly. The trim would be attached with finishing nails.

    I'm not really sure how to make the doors of the cabinets. Maybe I should buy them.

    The plans often say to assemble the trim into one frame and then attach it. Is that advisable in the case of this large project?

    According to the design the shelves will be spanning about 30". I am concerned that they will sag and also that the side pieces may bow outward. I understand that I can add skirts to each shelf which is more work I'd like to avoid. What is your best advice?
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

    Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

    I was going to suggest making one of the shelves stationary in each box, but if you're just filling an 8' space with 3 cabs and can custom build them to fit ... it shouldn't be necessary.

    Happily and woefully out of date
    ... and not buying the upgrade!

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

      Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

      that predrilled stuff at HD is a really poor quality particle board with a really crappy finish on it, look at it carefully then look at the shelves in a good kitchen cabinet, the difference will astound you!!

      for a paint grade finish, use the maple plywood from HD, drilling shelf holes is not difficult or time consuming

      if you intend to buy doors, get them first, and make the cabinets to fit

      you dont mention a budget or skill level, they will determine most of your options!!

      a few guys here, including myself, will make doors very reasonably
      my shop is a beaver lodge
      steve, sarnia, ont




      1940's Craftmaster Lathe

      https://www.facebook.com/artistryinwoodca/

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

        Re: Built-in Cabinet/Bookcase Design

        Originally posted by wood375 View Post
        I'm planning to build a built-in bookcase with cabinets at the base into an 8'x8' recess. The 3 cabinets will be something like 30" high and deeper than the shelves. Another 3 corresponding columns of adjustable shelves that reach the ceiling would sit on top of the cabinets.

        I've looked at many free designs on the net and I want to check with the experienced cabinet builders here about the soundness of my design.

        I'm trying to keep the design as simple and cheap as possible and have decided to construct 6 boxes. Three boxes are for the shelves and 3 are for the cabinets. I have a basic table saw but I'm not interested in ripping 4'x8' sheets of material. I want to use my 7 1/4" circular saw with a homemade T-square for cross-cuts.

        Home Depot sells 5/8" x 12" x 96" particle board with the peg holes already drilled. I don't feel like drilling a thousand holes either. For the shelves I would use 5/8" particle board as well. I noticed that a lot of plans call for 3/4" which I did not see at HD.

        A lot of plans on the web call for rabbets and dadoes. I would like to use rabbets on the tops and bottoms of the side pieces, but leave all of the shelves otherwise adjustable.

        All boxes would be trimmed with 1"x2" MDF. To assemble everything I would use strips of wood between the sides of the boxes and screw them together. The strips of wood would make the 1"x2" trim fit properly. The trim would be attached with finishing nails.

        I'm not really sure how to make the doors of the cabinets. Maybe I should buy them.

        The plans often say to assemble the trim into one frame and then attach it. Is that advisable in the case of this large project?

        According to the design the shelves will be spanning about 30". I am concerned that they will sag and also that the side pieces may bow outward. I understand that I can add skirts to each shelf which is more work I'd like to avoid. What is your best advice?

        Too many questions... And you really should do a drawing.

        Shelf sag-- Hopefully this link is self explanatory..
        http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator.htm

        Most shelf units have a fixed middle shelf to help prevent bowing and sagging. (If the shelves are tight it can assist in preventing sagging depending on shelf size-- I leave the geometry to you.) Often shelf units have a lip glued on to the front to form half an I-Beam -- to prevent severe sagging.

        As far as joinery, maybe biscuits (using plate joiner or biscuit joiner) is simpler. Look them up in home depot if you haven't used one. Ryobi is ok, DeWalt works correctly and the Porter Cable 557 works real good.

        You can also use glue and but joints (weak) or use the special particle board screws. or Confirmats. Look at Rockler for a picture
        http://www1.rockler.com/product.cfm?...d&cookietest=1


        I suggest you pick up one or more of the following book(s) by Danny Proulx.
        http://www.leevalley.com/wood/Search.aspx?c=1&action=n

        http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...=1,46096,46108
        http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...=1,46096,46105
        It's the same techinques...

        They were clearing out his book on storage solutions at Toronto West -- $5 a copy or whatever. He does a really good job of explaining how to build frameless cabinets. It sounds to me like you are building a frameless cabinet then sticking a face frame on it -- lots of people do that. Depending on the room layout you may not have to. Usually face frames are made of wood -- to provide strength to hold doors.

        As fr the system holes... (shelf holes) you can go the whole hog, or get a shelf drilling jig...
        http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...at=1,180,42311
        http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...at=1,180,42311

        Or you can make your own -- or mark and drill -- I have done that... Takes time and patience. Danny's book shows you how to make your own jig.

        Look up "shelf pin" in Lee Valley for a decent selction.

        If You visit Lee Valley you will find lots of books on storage solutions that walk you through building cabinets.

        Also dowelling Jigs and biscuits etc.
        ---
        Will

        Comment

        Working...
        X