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  • Stair replacement

    New to this forum, so thanks for even looking at my post...

    I just moved to a bungalow house and would like to "open" it up by replacing existing stairs with "see through" stairs. Since any custom job like this would probably be very expensive I would like to use what is already avaialble on the market.

    I have found 6-STEP STRINGER from PYLEX (prod #80645062 at rona). I am planning at installing nice dark painted treads afterwards. Is this something that can be used indoors? Any suggestions would help greatly...

    Thanks in advance
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  • #2

    Re: Stair replacement

    Re: Stair replacement

    Most of these precut stringers are not suitable for anything. A stringer must be custom cut for any installation as all the steps must be the same height (within 1/4" min to max, I think). You cannot just cut off a little at the top or bottom of the stringer to make it fit as you will create a dangerous tripping hazard.
    the other Ken
    ------
    "Each flitch, each board, each plant can have only one ideal use. The woodworker, applying a thousand skills, must find that ideal use and then shape the wood to realize its true potential" - George Nakashima

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    • #3

      Re: Stair replacement

      Re: Stair replacement

      For those that don't know, this is a pre-fabricated steel stringer, not the precut wood ones you can buy.

      AK

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      • #4

        Re: Stair replacement

        Re: Stair replacement

        First off the open riser concept won't meet the building code. I can't tell you how they get away with them in magazines I just know what your local building department will say. You can't have an opening that a 4" sphere (babies head ???) can pass through. A glass riser could work (I'm not saying it's a good idea just that it might be an option) but not an open riser, as could a perforated or expanded metal riser. I've never done it but I think it would fly. If you can't build stairs from scratch yourself, the best value in stairs is to call your local stair shop and get them to measure one up and deliver it for you to install

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        • #5

          Re: Stair replacement

          Re: Stair replacement

          The 4 inch rule is the reason you see very thick treads on open rise staircases. It's also the reason a small tight staircase does not look good with open risers. You CAN meet code requirements with open risers but you better be sure of your measurements.
          "Do it Right!"

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          • #6

            Re: Stair replacement

            Re: Stair replacement

            Forgive my ignorance but you said Bungalow - so I'm curious where these stairs are and where they are going - basement - outside?
            Nothing is ever as straightforward as it seems.

            Glenn from Winnipeg

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            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Stair replacement

              Re: Stair replacement

              im with you glenn, a typical bungalow stair case is like 12 steps or even 13

              ive built lots of stair cases, its tricky for sure
              my shop is a beaver lodge
              steve, sarnia, ont




              1940's Craftmaster Lathe

              https://www.facebook.com/artistryinwoodca/

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              • #8

                Re: Stair replacement

                Re: Stair replacement

                I did almost the same thing at my house. I took out thethe original fully supported staircase and replaced it with a freestanding one. I used Timberstrand LSL stairs stingers (basically just 1 1/4 by 14" x 16' engineered lumber) The timberstrand website has all the technical specs to ensure you buy proper sizes and maintain appropriate span disances for safety etc. Of course as others have said you will have to cut the stingers to the right rise and run for your particu;ar house. This isn't overly difficult but does require some math. I got a book from the library to help me with this. It's called "Basic Stairbuilding" by Scott Schuttner. Sorry I don't have any pics as I am not yet done. Staricase is in place as are the hardwood treads and risers, but I am still missing railings. All in all it went pretty smoothly and was less than haldf teh cost of getting it done.

                Scott

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                • #9

                  Re: Stair replacement

                  Re: Stair replacement

                  You mean like this.....code infraction ?? what code infraction ?? i don't see no stinkin infraction....Seriously, there is nothing right about this place but when it was built but at least it looks a lot nicer now that we refinshed everything.

                  I beleive back in the day there was a little "out" clause in the code that could allow this if challenged. That's been removed now I beleive from most situations.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by OttawaP; 05-25-2011, 04:31 PM.
                  Paul

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                  • #10

                    Re: Stair replacement

                    Re: Stair replacement

                    Originally posted by OttawaP View Post
                    You mean like this.....code infraction ?? what code infraction ?? i don't see no stinkin infraction....Seriously, there is nothing right about this place but when it was built but at least it looks a lot nicer now that we refinshed everything.
                    It's amazing what an architects stamp, insurance and a good lawyer will get you , eh. It really is a shame that our betters have taken so much fun and creativity out of our jobs. This would be condemned in Canada today http://www.finewoodworking.com/uploa...-maloof_md.jpg

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