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Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

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  • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

    Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

    as soon as swmbo buys the door to replace the one that is there.
    sigpic
    Jerome
    Canada's South Coast
    Port Colborne On.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
    Benjamin Franklin

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    • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

      Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

      Laying it on thick…..adventures in self-leveling concrete

      With the primer dry, the next step was to get rid of the dip once and for all…..and the best method for dealing with uneven spots that require a smooth finish has to be self-leveling concrete. For anyone who isn’t familiar, SLC is a polymer modified non-sanded concrete that is simply mixed up in a pail and poured on the low spots. Being thin, the concrete tends to try and find it’s own level (hence the name), and dries to a rock solid and smooth surface.

      OK: The key to a successful application over a wooden subfloor is making sure the concrete sticks. This begins by making sure the subfloor is well screwed down to the joists and there is no movement, and then priming the wood.



      The next step is to staple down expanded metal lath where the concrete is going to be applied any thicker than ¼” or so.

      I began by measuring and cutting the mesh and then stapling it down to the floor, overlapping any seams.




      The next step in your prep is to take steps to make sure the concrete only goes where you want it.

      I took a minute to stuff any gaps or openings around the perimeter of the wall with fiberglass insulation



      And finally, I needed to build a wooden “dam” where the kitchen floor met the hallway. You can use just about any wood to make a dam (I used 1X2), but make sure you use a release agent on the wood before pouring as this concrete sticks REALLY well…to just about everything.

      So I coated the dam with my expensive, high-tech, specialized release agent


      And started to prep the concrete.


      Tools and materials: Clean 20l pail, corded or high voltage cordless drill (the Milwaukee shown is a 28V powerhouse), a mixing attachment (about 10.00 at the hardware store), a straight edge, a trowel, and of course; the self-leveling concrete.
      I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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      • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

        Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

        First the water is measured and put in the pail, and then the concrete is added TO the water (never vice-versa).


        And mix it up


        Finally it’s just poured onto the lowest spots adding more concrete as required.



        Now, even though these products claim to be self leveling, in my experience they benefit hugely from a little bit of help. For my job I used two bags of concrete, and a long aluminum straight edge to draw across the pour making it all level out. (beer bottle for size reference....yeah, that's it..."size reference" ;) )


        My “dam” at work


        And finally, you’ll want to feather out any edges with your trowel to ensure a smooth transition between the wood and concrete.




        OK, that wraps up another entry. Tomorrow we are going to look at the kitchen floor….the brand new, wet area approved (gasp!) laminate from Armstrong flooring.

        Thanks for looking

        Ryan
        Last edited by Ryan Shervill; 09-22-2011, 11:12 PM.
        I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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        • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

          Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

          Another great post.
          A (perhaps) simple question: Doesn't that dam create a small step when the SLC dries? or am I missing something?

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          • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

            Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

            Originally posted by mreza View Post
            Another great post.
            A (perhaps) simple question: Doesn't that dam create a small step when the SLC dries? or am I missing something?
            Thanks mreza.

            There is a step.....in fact, even without the concrete there was going to be one due to the 1/4" subfloor and the tile ending there. When we butt the hall flooring (carpet) against the ledge though, it should be pretty much even.
            I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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            • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

              Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

              Great log of your project Ryan! Just curious about the primer. Every SLC product I have used, has its own product specific primer, and some of them are for specific substrates. It appears you used a latex primer? I have never seen this before.

              thanks..scott

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              • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                Originally posted by scott_w View Post
                Great log of your project Ryan! Just curious about the primer. Every SLC product I have used, has its own product specific primer, and some of them are for specific substrates. It appears you used a latex primer? I have never seen this before.

                thanks..scott
                You are correct.....each brand has it's own primer, but due to a complete seniors moment I neglected to order it. Now living here it's not like I can just make a quick run to the store (thank god for Lowe's delivery!)....so I decided to do some research.

                While I could not get a definitive answer as to wether this super-primer would work, all indicators showed that it *should*...so I decided to risk it

                The primer is made for (and sticks to) concrete, wood, metal, and even tile....so I thought to myself that having concrete on one side and wood on the other would be OK.

                Now in my defence, I did do a test piece before committing to the whole floor, and there was no sign of seperation tendency...so I went for it.

                Disclaimer: You should probably use the specific primer for the SLC you choose....what worked for me may not work for you
                I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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                • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                  Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                  Ive been in situations like that myself Ryan! LOL. I think the main issue with SLC is it shrinking slightly as it dries. It "pulls" back, possibly breaking the bond. Seeing as you prefilled with plywood, and the SLC is thin, the shrinkage should be minimal.
                  One would think that latex primer would provide some elasticity to help with that.

                  Good luck.. love the pics... keep them coming!

                  scott

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                  • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                    Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                    Originally posted by Ryan Shervill View Post
                    [/SIZE][/FONT]
                    Tools and materials: Clean 20l pail, corded or high voltage cordless drill (the Milwaukee shown is a 28V powerhouse), a mixing attachment (about 10.00 at the hardware store), a straight edge, a trowel, and of course; the self-leveling concrete.
                    And you didn't just use a Router. I am sure it would have mixed up that concrete in 1/10 the time it took with the drill.

                    Matt.
                    Matt

                    People are like a box of chocolates. It's hard to tell initially which ones are nuts.

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                    • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                      Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                      Originally posted by matt.mackinnon View Post
                      And you didn't just use a Router. I am sure it would have mixed up that concrete in 1/10 the time it took with the drill.

                      Matt.
                      You first....I'll watch (and hold the camera )
                      I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                        Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                        Sorry for the delay in updating folks…between thunderstorms, rural internet AND trying to finish up this build, the cards were stacked against me. I’m back at it though!

                        Let’s get this floor down.

                        I love tile in a kitchen….well, more accurately, I love the *look* of tile in a kitchen, but for this house tile had too many disadvantages to be a viable contender as a flooring choice. From the flex in the floors to my love for cooking with cast iron pots and pans (and my clumsy tendencies), tile just wasn’t in the cards.

                        Lucky for me though, there is an alternative that gives the look and durability of tile, but installs easily and is far more forgiving to floor movement (and clumsy cooks with heavy pans): Laminate tile.

                        I know there are a bunch of people right now thinking “Laminate does NOT belong in a kitchen!”, and a few years ago you would have been right…..but not anymore.

                        We chose to use a new Laminate by Armstrong floors that is not only realistic looking and easy to install, but is approved (including warranty) for use in wet locations….even in bathrooms. Now there are a few differences when it comes to installing this laminate for wet locations, but nothing too difficult. For my kitchen I chose to use the install technique for bathroom use, just to get a little added protection from spills. This is what I’ll show you.

                        Let’s get into it:

                        Before any flooring could go down, I needed to put 3/8” plywood plates down which the cabinets would sit on. The reason for this was to avoid having the laminate run under the cabinets which would inhibit expansion….and besides, there’s no point in buying flooring that no one will ever see, right? The cabinet positions were drawn out on the floor, and the plywood was cut about ¼” undersize (to hide the expansion gap for the flooring later on) and attached down with staples. (notice how smooth that self-leveling concrete came out )



                        OK, time for some actually flooring! So just like any laminate job, the first step is to install a roll underlay. An underlay does a few things for you…it acts a moisture barrier, quiets footsteps, and helps even out slight irregularities in your subfloor, but most importantly: It allows the laminate flooring to “move” easily. For those who aren’t familiar with Laminate floor installation, it is what’s known as a “floating” floor. The laminate is not attached down at any point, and there is a gap left around the perimeter of the room. This allows the floor to freely expand and contract with seasonal moisture changes, ensuring it stays flat



                        The underlay has an adhesive strip on one side, and a “flap” on the other. This allows you to join the strips of underlay together to form a continuous barrier.



                        The underlay is laid down, leaving a couple of extra inches running up the walls (we’ll remove most of it later, so you don’t have to be too neat here), and once that’s down, the laminate is installed. The laminate “clicks” together just like other laminate floors, but for this application we are applying a special glue to the tongues as well. This glue dries to a rubber/silicone like texture, and serves to waterproof the seams.




                        Anywhere there is a seam in the underlay where there is no adhesive needs to be taped together with vinyl tape.



                        Finally, after all the flooring is down, the protruding underlay is trimmed off with a pair of snips


                        And the expansion gap is filled with silicone caulking. This seals the only remaining exposed core of the laminate, creating a totally enveloped and waterproof floor.

                        Last edited by Ryan Shervill; 09-27-2011, 10:47 PM.
                        I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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                        • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                          Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                          ...continued



                          And that’s it! The floor is down, the cabinet bases in position, and just in time…..we have a few boxes to open stacked up in the living room. That’s right, the Kraftmaid truck arrived!




                          Next entry, I’ll open the boxes and take a good look at the cabinets from a woodworker’s perspective.

                          Ryan
                          I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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                          • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                            Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                            the first box you need it to the left of the fireplace.
                            Looks good so far.
                            sigpic
                            Jerome
                            Canada's South Coast
                            Port Colborne On.
                            Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
                            Benjamin Franklin

                            Comment


                            • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                              Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                              Was there much squeeze out of the adhesive?

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                              • Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                                Re: Ryan Shervill's 2011 DIY renovation...."Maximum Makeover, the inside edition"

                                Originally posted by Jerome View Post
                                the first box you need it to the left of the fireplace.
                                Looks good so far.
                                If you only knew how true that statement was.......

                                Originally posted by Buster2000 View Post
                                Was there much squeeze out of the adhesive?
                                There was....probably more than there should have been due to my generous use of the glue, but a wet reg close by took care of the problem. As each new piece of floor was clicked into place I just gave the joint a wipe and it was problem solved
                                I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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