Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16

    Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

    Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

    Originally posted by Rob in Oak Ridges View Post
    Before doing anything I'd personally make sure to call the proper services (Hydro) to come and double check where the lines go under ground. You might be surprised that the hydro goes away from the house and an excavator can get in there no problem. Or you might find something unexpected.
    Already done that... and note that on their form you need to explicitly state if you are doing a hand-dig or not.
    It's not about you.

    Comment


    • #17

      Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

      Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

      ok digging it out, membrane and all of that is fine, but if you want to fix it from inside you can clean out the crack, or drill it out a bit to expose fresh clean cement then fill the crack with hydraulic cement. It can be found at home depot or your favorite big box store and it has the unique property of expanding as it dries.

      My sister had issues with holes from rusted out strapping causing water leaking in and this fixed it and I have used it on numerous occasions to fill cracks.

      Not that epoxies won't work, and yes if the water isn't draining from outside the wall it will probably cause a damp foundation, but if you have water running in you could try this and wait for a sunny day to go out digging.

      Phil
      “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” -Bertrand Russell

      Comment


      • #18

        Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

        Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

        Here are some examples of ones I have done. As mentioned, either the "BlueSkin" pr "Blue Seal" (I think) and then the drainage membrane (planton)on the outside are the best. If the crack is very wide/deep, clean out and use hydraulic cement on it first.

        If it were me, and the crack caused minimal problems inside I would do what I suggested earlier and break open the slab on the inside and put in a small pc of planton (variation of the pic I posted). It would only take you 2-4 hrs.

        BTW.. you need a machine like mine.

        Scott
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #19

          Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

          Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

          Originally posted by bender View Post
          I've had hundreds of those cracks repaired.

          Dig to footing, wash and dry wall, prime with blueskin type primer, apply blueskin membrane, cover with basement drainage wrap, backfill.

          Be careful not to damage your weeping tile.
          I had an issue similar to what you seem to have going on Art. I happened to have some digging going on by my foundation and repaired it with blueskin as Bender has described.

          Matt
          SPCHT

          Comment


          • #20

            Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

            Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

            Originally posted by ArtMulder View Post
            Mike, that is an incredibly detailed photo album, thank-you. That is also one of the cleanest and straightest holes I've ever seen... sure you don't do that for a living? I take it the clay there just holds it's shape well? How long ago did you do that job, and how dry has the basement been since then? I notice that you did not put in the drainage pipe wrapped in a "sock"... was there any reason for that?
            Haha, you aren't the first to say that. I have a lot of respect for anyone that does that for a living. That was a lot more digging than I was figuring as you can tell by the photos I kind of ran out of room to put all the dirt and the neighbors weren't very pleased at all. The digging wouldn't have been so bad except all the soil here is actually mostly clay so that stuff is a brute. If I had to do it again, I would probably try and find someone with a machine that could get in there, but space is pretty minimal so not even sure if that would be possible.

            I did want the weeping tile with the sock on it, but couldn't find it anywhere I looked. I figured with the amount of 3/4" limestone I put down there it will probably be OK. The crack was pretty minimal, but no issues since it was fixed.

            Comment


            • #21

              Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

              Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

              Gentlemen,

              If I may offer a small bit of advice. While it doesn't necessarily address the repair itself, I have seen similar issues. Once you do find a suitable method of repair and you've excavated the outer perimiter, I would suggest backfilling with clay and only adding a couple inches of topsoil for grass. The combination of repair and a 8-12" clay cap should ensure you never have another problem. Just be sure to hand tamp (every 2-3") and not use a plate tamper or jumping jack as it could damage both your repair and the foundation.

              Best of luck!

              Comment


              • #22

                Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                Originally posted by callee View Post
                Just a thought, have you inquired how much it would be for a guy with a mini excavator to come in and dig it for you? You could then do the sealing work yourself, and even fill it in yourself (remember to tamp it), and you'd probably still be ahead in the money dept. That's just a lot of digging for you, and the fact that the machine could come in and just have it done in 15 min, why, that would probably be worth the money, right? You could have the job done in a day then, and have the next day free to do other things (as opposed to lying on the couch the entire next day, recuperating your back)
                ETA

                depending on your experience level, I know our local rental will just rent you a mini, if you know how to use it.



                Very sound advice.


                Also remember the spill pile will add weight to the area just to the side of the trench. Check out the regulations for shoring. You should be able to do it yourself. [ It's been 45 years since I worked with trenches so things will have changed]

                Note: do not go by the age old adage you can inspect it and determine if it will not cave in!

                Consider sandblasting the concrete foundation before appling the fix.
                Egon
                from
                The South Shore, Nova Scotia

                Comment


                • #23

                  Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                  Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                  Originally posted by callee View Post
                  If you do dig your big trench, make sure you brace it as you go. Too many guys have died when the trench they're digging caves in on them.
                  Everyone... listen to Ryan, he speaks truth. Our ground here is wet sticky clay under about 10-12" of top soil. Solid. Very. I was sure it wouldn't go anywhere. But this morning I was about 10" from the footings, so about 5-and-a-half foot in the ground with my trench, and I saw a crack start up in the clay wall. I got out in a big hurry, and about 1-2 minutes later watched the wall slowwwwwly cave in. Cost us probably another 2 hrs of work, and good big scare.

                  Not sure if I'll ever consider tackling a job like this again. Thankfully we're done now.



                  Originally posted by scott_w View Post
                  If it were me, and the crack caused minimal problems inside I would do what I suggested earlier and break open the slab on the inside and put in a small pc of planton (variation of the pic I posted). It would only take you 2-4 hrs.
                  Scott, I should have answered you back when you posted... My only complaint with a solution like you give is that it doesn't work in an unfinished basement like I have. I have a bare concrete wall there, and no real plans to cover it up. It's just a playroom, and we're leaving it as such. I wouldn't want that bare plastic just sitting out there.

                  ...
                  ...


                  We followed the recommended method of dig, clean, Aquatec emulsion primer, blueskin WP200, then Platon, and then added about a foot of 3/4" crushed gravel in the bottom of the trench, covered that with weed block fabric, and refilled the hole. I really hop that does the trick.
                  (That's belt AND suspenders AND another belt. Those darn pants better stay up now!! )

                  1- getting started digging on Friday
                  IMG_1407.jpg

                  2- Friday evening, stopped about halfway down
                  DSC_2879.jpg

                  3- Saturday morning, partial collapse of the side wall
                  1-collapse.jpg

                  4- Priming with the Blueskin primer
                  2-primer-emulsion.jpg

                  5- Rolling out the Blueskin
                  6-blueskin4.jpg

                  6- Here's the platon in place, and some (or all, I forget) of the gravel in place. I tell you that electrical service with the big loop-de-loop in the wire was a literal pain in the neck to work around. Ugh.
                  9-platon2.jpg

                  7- Lost count of the number of wheelbarrow loads we dumped. One thing is for sure, we need a better wheelbarrow!
                  IMG_1445.jpg

                  8- Here you go. Found this can of sprite at the bottom of the trench. The bottom. It is from 1984, when the house was built. It was NOT crushed, and it is still easily legible. 280ml, which is smaller than the 355 cans we get nowadays.
                  IMG_1430.jpg
                  It's not about you.

                  Comment


                  • #24

                    Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                    Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                    ps: In case anyone wants to see how the pros do it, I found this video online that pretty slickly demonstrates a pro job from start to finish.

                    Note, this is basically an advertisement for a company, and I have no idea if they are a good, bad, or meh sort of company.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDla-8NCJWo
                    It's not about you.

                    Comment


                    • #25

                      Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                      Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                      Thank goodness there were no injuries.


                      Some clays will stand for a little time and all looks good. Then there is " whump " and a side caves in!
                      Egon
                      from
                      The South Shore, Nova Scotia

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                        Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                        Hey Art,
                        I'm looking to do a similar project in London as well. Do you have any left over dimple mat I could buy from you?

                        Comment


                        • #27

                          Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                          Re: digging up a bit of the foundation for waterproofing..

                          Originally posted by WillBon View Post
                          Hey Art,
                          I'm looking to do a similar project in London as well. Do you have any left over dimple mat I could buy from you?
                          Nope, sorry. Sold it on Kijiji as soon as I could -- someone bought the dimple and the blueskin.
                          It's not about you.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X