Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electric code question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16

    Re: Electric code question

    Re: Electric code question

    One last time for those not trying to be right.... If you cannot reach the fixture from the bath tub you do not need a GFCI protected circuit.

    Now, that clothe wrap insulation has always been a thorn in my side. I've never had any luck dealing with it. Under the right conditions and age, it gets very brittle, and literally falls off when moved. That said, as long as don't goof around with it, you're fine. Mice love to chew on it though....

    Oh, and for the record... The electrician on that job Rusty is very full of it.

    Jarrett (who's remembering why he stopped answering code threads)

    Comment


    • #17

      Re: Electric code question

      Re: Electric code question

      Not an Electrician:


      The little I know would indicate that there would be a minimum distance involved which would require a ground fault breaker for the entire bathroom.
      Egon
      from
      The South Shore, Nova Scotia

      Comment


      • #18

        Re: Electric code question

        Re: Electric code question

        Thanks Jarrett. I'm with you on this one. I think they have a guy who is just interpreting and quoting code to up the charges and profits.

        Thanks Egon the bathroom will be on a GFCI where needed. That has never been in question. It might be the one thing I'm certain of. Thanks again.
        "Do it Right!"

        Comment


        • #19

          Re: Electric code question

          Re: Electric code question

          Originally posted by Egon View Post
          Not an Electrician:


          The little I know would indicate that there would be a minimum distance involved which would require a ground fault breaker for the entire bathroom.
          Egon, code in Ontario is anything within 1.5m

          I wonder if what the electrician and the new fixtures might be confusing is that some fixtures that get hot you need to make sure you connect to wire that is rated for 90C? AFAIK romex is but the old cloth covered stuff is not? - just a guess!!

          Comment


          • #20

            Re: Electric code question

            Re: Electric code question

            Originally posted by Rusty View Post
            Thanks so far boys. An additional question is whether or not the home owners can put in new light fixtures on existent wire. The house was built between 70 and 74 and has Romex 14/2 throughout. It's the old cloth insulated wire with basic black, white and bare ground. The electrician informed the homeowners that he could not mount a new fixture on that wire because new fixtures are thermally protected and the old wire might cause a fire. He said he could remount the old fixtures but not new ones. If the owners wanted him to mount new fixtures he would need to rip out the old wire and put in new. If he's to be believed that would mean anyone of you with a mid 70's house can not change an old light fixture to a new fixture of today at the risk of burning down your house.
            My house was built in 1967 and over the last 10 years I've replaced every light fixture and almost every light switch and receptacle. The house is still standing! Some of the wiring is the old cloth covered kind but I had no problems with it.
            Regards

            Barry


            "That's why I love my computer,,,,,,,, my friends live in it."
            - Colin Greg,
            Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England

            "Yes, cheap pens can be made. I don't make them."
            - Daniel, Reno, NV

            Comment


            • #21

              Re: Electric code question

              Re: Electric code question

              Doug that's what he's saying. I guess the question, from my stand point anyway, is how do you determine which fixture will get hot? I can certainly understand pot lights but what about a wall sconce or ceiling mount?
              "Do it Right!"

              Comment


              • #22

                Re: Electric code question

                Re: Electric code question

                Re: old wires and new light fixtures

                I worked as an apprentice electrician for about 18 months about 9 years ago (broke my dominant thumb in an unrelated accident and then left the trade when it still hurt to use my side cutters months later).

                I don't know the Code, but I know what the journeymen told me to do and I spent days in attics putting in junction boxes 18-36" away from the existing light boxes. We would run 90 degree rated nm-b or nm90 from the light's box to the new junction, and splice to the old wires (anything stamped 1987 or older).

                Most new fixtures are clearly identified in the UL disclaimer area if they require this.


                All that said, I've replaced most the fixtures in my current house of a mid 50's vintage. The only jumps I installed was for the massive ceiling fan light and the pot lights.
                Last edited by Dave in Edmonton; 08-02-2012, 01:58 PM.

                Comment


                • #23

                  Re: Electric code question

                  Re: Electric code question

                  Originally posted by Dave in Edmonton View Post
                  I worked as an electrician for about 18 months about 9 years ago.
                  .....

                  I know it wasn't your intent in the slightest, but it really torques my gears when assume my title without the credentials..

                  Comment


                  • #24

                    Re: Electric code question

                    Re: Electric code question

                    Originally posted by J. Vibert View Post
                    .....

                    I know it wasn't your intent in the slightest, but it really torques my gears when assume my title without the credentials..
                    I worked as an *apprentice* for a short time many years ago. (Should be more cognizant. I'm a P.Eng now - don't get me started on people using the title 'engineer'.)

                    Comment


                    • #25

                      Re: Electric code question

                      Re: Electric code question

                      I know of one electrician who had no problem with it. New install - old light fixture.
                      It casts such lovely light on the walls (when it's been dusted - which is the only pain in the butt with this installation!)
                      As to hitting my head on it, I tend not to get in and out of the tub in a poker straight position.
                      Attached Files
                      Donna,
                      Self Imposed Queen of Design Opportunities

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        Re: Electric code question

                        Re: Electric code question

                        Originally posted by callee View Post
                        that's better than these guys!
                        That has to be a joke. Unbelievable.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X