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  • range hood installation

    I'm planing to install a hood above our gas stove.it will be a stand alone wall installation ,(not under cabinet).I need to cut a vent hole to the outside(second floor,vinyl siding),Ialready made a template of the back of the hood and transferred it on the wall:


    2013_1128installatiohoodrange0001.jpg
    I'll explain my plan, I'm basically asking you to let me know if I'm on the right track or not since I have never done this type of work and the installer we called wants $300 to do the job although he's reluctant to go on a ladder in this cold weather .
    I'm planing to:
    1)drill 4 hole in each corner of the discharge hole( 3 1/4" X101/2") so it can be cut out from outside.

    2) cut out the template portion of drywall (30" X10").copy/duplicate it on the same size plywood.
    mark keyholes,electrical/vent holes on,the plywood (stronger than drywall , can hold the weight of the hood).

    3) use a jigsaw or a reciprocating saw to cut out the vent hole to the outside(using the 4 drilled holes) from inside the house.

    4)install horizontal supports flush to the studs so the plywood has more surface to hold on to and better support the weight of the hood.screw the plywood to the wall,install the hood to the plywood.

    5) install the vent discharge from outside,caulk,done.

    Does it make sense to cut out the whole template portion in order to gain access to the outside wall from inside? or just cut out the vent,and install the hood,do the rest of the job(vent hole) from outside(second floor,on a ladder.in minus 10°)?
    Please feel free to let me know what you think ,if my plan will work,etc.
    Thank you all.
    Ken.
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: range hood installation

    Re: range hood installation

    I would cut a big enough hole in the drywall to reach the studs either side and big enough vertically to frame round the vent and sort the A/vb ,insulation etc .Cut the hole, move the insulation out of the way so the pilot holes to the outside are clear.Then put on a warm suit go up the ladder and cut through with a sawzall with a fairly fine tooth blade.This is Canada -10 for 30mins is no big deal.It will also remind you why the $300 quote.I think that is a very fair price by the way

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    • #3

      Re: range hood installation

      Re: range hood installation

      You should really remove some of the siding and put proper siding trim around the opening. I am no siding person and had a friend do some siding work for me, he was able to remove the siding and then trim out the opening I had made and then replace the siding as if it was always there.
      Steve The Drill Sergeant
      Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

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      • #4

        Re: range hood installation

        Re: range hood installation

        Originally posted by jay View Post
        I would cut a big enough hole in the drywall to reach the studs either side and big enough vertically to frame round the vent
        The piece I'm cutting out (30"x10") covers two vertical studs,(not very visible in the picture)do you think I should cut out a wider piece to expose 4 studs?

        Originally posted by schor_ View Post
        You should really remove some of the siding and put proper siding trim around the opening. .
        I just bought the rectangular vent that goes outside ,it has good 1/2" trim around it that will cover the jagged edges in the siding,very similar to this youtube clip.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJEMZP9pnNQ
        Thank you both by the way.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: range hood installation

          Re: range hood installation

          If you cut studs then you'll have to put a double header in for support. Also, to do the outside properly you'll have to remove some siding & properly flash around the vent flange. The flashing below the vent must overlap the nailing flange of the piece of siding below the vent. Vinyl siding gets a little brittle this time of the year so you have to handle it a little gently.
          Paul W.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: range hood installation

            Re: range hood installation

            It doesn't look like I will need to cut the studs.
            I was hoping I didn't need to remove the siding,just like the clip on youtube I linked above,doing it like that I can manage.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: range hood installation

              Re: range hood installation

              A couple of thoughts from an old kitchen guy. First, how are you supporting the hood without a cabinet above it? Second, do you realize that you will be pumping your hard earned heat outside when you turn that thing on? It will also create negative pressure in your house with implications for furnace and hot water heaters spilling CO2. Have you considered a recirculater? Do you realize that cold will leak into the house no matter how good the fan is? Just my 2 cents.
              Cheers.
              I'm not getting older, I'm getting worse.
              Bob
              Member Valley Woodturners

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: range hood installation

                Re: range hood installation

                I hear what you're saying about just caulking the flange to the siding Ken. Trouble with the vid clip is that they're trying to get people to buy the dremel. They did mention caulking, but it's not good building practice to rely on that alone when you can permanently seal the opening against water ingress with flashing.
                If you don't feel confident doing the flashing then go with the caulking. There are lots of areas around our houses where flashing isn't feasible so the water proof barrier is applied underneath forming a total envelope for the house. Windows are a good example. If any water gets in, it can only run down & out. You'll be cutting through the envelope. If you go that route, use the red tape to seal the barrier that you have around the vent opening.
                Paul W.

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: range hood installation

                  Re: range hood installation

                  Originally posted by distrbd View Post
                  The piece I'm cutting out (30"x10") covers two vertical studs,(not very visible in the picture)do you think I should cut out a wider piece to expose 4 studs?


                  I just bought the rectangular vent that goes outside ,it has good 1/2" trim around it that will cover the jagged edges in the siding,very similar to this youtube clip.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJEMZP9pnNQ
                  Thank you both by the way.
                  I don't see why you have to expose more studs .It is just so you can sort the insulation ,A/vb
                  etc and secure your plywood or replace drywall.It s possible by drilling the rangehood you can put a couple of screws to secure the rangehood to the studs.By the layout it looks to me like an average hood (Nu-tone etc)which generally don't weigh much at all easy anchors into drywall will hold them .My hood which I built myself is the other extreme, 600cfm twin squirrel cage fans and a copper liner (16oz /sqft)so it is held up with 2 1/2 in No 10's into the studs as it has no upper cabinet. This brings upper a previous post re uppers If you have those your problem of support is solved.One last point please adhere to the code about height/clearance above and beside cook top especially with gas.When a large pot is placed on the burner on a high flame the heat spreads considerably.Also if your heating and hot water supply uses combustion air from within the house turn on all exhaust fans as well and test for spillage (i.e backflow)at the draft hood of the furnace and water tank You may well be aware of this and if so I apologise for belabouring the point.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: range hood installation

                    Re: range hood installation

                    Cut the vent hole large enough to allow for the galv. duct and be particular installing it so grease doesn't end up in the wall cavity.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: range hood installation

                      Re: range hood installation

                      Originally posted by Bobmezz View Post
                      A couple of thoughts from an old kitchen guy. First, how are you supporting the hood without a cabinet above it? Second, do you realize that you will be pumping your hard earned heat outside when you turn that thing on? It will also create negative pressure in your house with implications for furnace and hot water heaters spilling CO2. Have you considered a recirculater? Do you realize that cold will leak into the house no matter how good the fan is? Just my 2 cents.
                      Cheers.
                      The hood is 600 cfm,yet onlyweighs around 30 lbs,will be well anchored with 4 long screws to the studs and 4 shorter ones to the plywood/horizontal cleats ,so there should be no worries with supporting the weight.
                      http://www.ajmadison.com/cgi-bin/ajm...?brand_store=1
                      Originally posted by Bobmezz View Post
                      Second, do you realize that you will be pumping your hard earned heat outside when you turn that thing on? It will also create negative pressure in your house with implications for furnace and hot water heaters spilling CO2. Have you considered a recirculater? Do you realize that cold will leak into the house no matter how good the fan is? Just my 2 cents.
                      Cheers.
                      I realize we will be pumping out the heat/money with that fan going but there's no other way,we already are doing that (every time we cook)with leaving the sliding doors (front and back) open to get rid of the smell ,we had a recirculating fan before and it never did the job.
                      Putting the fan on medium speed and opening the window an inch should get rid of the smell efficiently.



                      Originally posted by Paul Woodrow View Post
                      If you don't feel confident doing the flashing then go with the caulking. There are lots of areas around our houses where flashing isn't feasible so the water proof barrier is applied underneath forming a total envelope for the house. Windows are a good example. If any water gets in, it can only run down & out. You'll be cutting through the envelope. If you go that route, use the red tape to seal the barrier that you have around the vent opening.
                      You brought up a valid point.
                      I do understand now about the flashing,it is the same idea when installing a skylight,right?.it has to be completely sealed around the hole so no moisture or rain could creep into the interior of the wall but for the time being a good caulking will have to do,also may improvise something impermeable around the hole without spending too much time on the ladder in minus 10°.



                      Originally posted by jay View Post
                      One last point please adhere to the code about height/clearance above and beside cook top especially with gas.When a large pot is placed on the burner on a high flame the heat spreads considerably.Also if your heating and hot water supply uses combustion air from within the house turn on all exhaust fans as well and test for spillage (i.e backflow)at the draft hood of the furnace and water tank You may well be aware of this and if so I apologise for belabouring the point.
                      The minimum distance for the hood is 30" ,is labeled all over the hood,also found that out via the internet.
                      The Furnace is new and takes it's combustion air from outside,the water heater is electric(for now),
                      Originally posted by jay View Post

                      turn on all exhaust fans as well and test for spillage (i.e backflow)
                      I'm sure there will be some air leakage at the hood although I should add, there are two flaps with rubber seals one inside the hood and one in the vent .
                      Thank you all for very your informative and very educational posts ,I will go ahead and do this project before it gets too cold,promise to update when completed.
                      A big thank you to every one of you.
                      Ken.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: range hood installation

                        Re: range hood installation

                        Originally posted by Bill R. View Post
                        Cut the vent hole large enough to allow for the galv. duct and be particular installing it so grease doesn't end up in the wall cavity.
                        Thanks for pointing that out.
                        The installation guide that came with the hood also mentioned that,to cut 1/2" larger for the duct to freely move in the hole.
                        I also have a good supply of those Aluminum duct tape with the very sticky adhesive on it,I should be able to seal the whole thing well.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: range hood installation

                          Re: range hood installation

                          Originally posted by distrbd View Post
                          Thanks for pointing that out.
                          The installation guide that came with the hood also mentioned that,to cut 1/2" larger for the duct to freely move in the hole.
                          I also have a good supply of those Aluminum duct tape with the very sticky adhesive on it,I should be able to seal the whole thing well.
                          I might suggest using a high temperature silicone as used in automotive application 700 F( read the specs as may are only good to 400-450 F ) easily obtained at auto parts stores for $5-$8 a small tube and as it is hidden the bright red colour of some won't matter.My boiler sections are assembled with it at the factory

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: range hood installation

                            Re: range hood installation

                            Most hoods can be set up with carbon filters and recycle the air indoors rather than punching a hole in the wall and making sure you have adequate makeup air to avoid back drafting other gas units or fireplaces. Recirculating hoods are legal - I'm using one. Properly operating natural gas stove should only produce CO2 and water vapour - the carbon filters would trap the grease

                            Should note that I also have an hrv with a return vent behind the fridge

                            Just my experience
                            Nothing is ever as straightforward as it seems.

                            Glenn from Winnipeg

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: range hood installation

                              Re: range hood installation

                              Originally posted by jay View Post
                              I might suggest using a high temperature silicone as used in automotive application 700 F
                              Never thought of using that type (or any type )of silicone to seal the transition piece to the duct,it also will help dampen the noise and potential vibrations.great suggestion.
                              Originally posted by Glenn from Winnipeg View Post
                              Recirculating hoods are legal - I'm using one. Properly operating natural gas stove should only produce CO2 and water vapour - the carbon filters would trap the grease

                              Should note that I also have an hrv with a return vent behind the fridge

                              Just my experience
                              I'm sure you are happy with your decision to go ductless,and sure glad it's working out for you. they may have improved on it's design since I last used one.my wife spent a good few months researching all the gadgets for her kitchen .she wanted ductless.
                              It is good to know your positive experience.

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