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Top 10 Underrated Tools

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  • #16

    Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

    Originally posted by flairwoodworks View Post
    callee Have you ever tried to use an old plastic gift/membership/credit card for any of those applications?
    No, never tried one of those. I imagine it would probably work just as well, though. The aluminum might be a bit more durable than plastic over the long run, maybe. I think I really just grabbed the aluminum though because, as usual, we were out on an island in the middle of the bay, and out there you tend to find ways to work with what you have. Also, I think mrs. callee would probably want me to my a gym membership card to better use!

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    • #17

      Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

      Originally posted by Egon View Post

      Thanks.

      I’ve got a few items that have reworked brass or copper plumbing items in use.
      Most of my turning tools have shop made handles. I used brass plumbing fittings as ferrules on several of them. Fairly easy to machine the corners off and make them round with HSS wood turning tools as long as you take your time. I finished them up with a fine file and progressively finer sandpaper. Copper pipe works just as well and requires no machining.
      Cheers
      Randy

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      • #18

        Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

        I liked Rob's original list of tools and thought I would have a go at my own list:

        1. Boston pencil sharpener and LV H pencils (two things I know but they work together as a tool)
        2. Small saddle square
        3. Coffee stir sticks (epoxy mixers/glue applicators/clean up tools/etc; often used with alterations effected by #8 following))
        4. Small brass try square (mine is shop-made)
        5. Block planes (any/all of the many; another combo but I use these things all the time and cannot choose a favourite!)
        6. Pencil gauge
        7. 12 & 18 inch stainless steel flexible rulers
        8. Utility and X-Acto knives (go to tools that get very regular use)
        9. Adjustable combination square
        10. Small back saws/bench hook combination

        These guys don't receive the attention that good planes, chisels, saws etc. get but they are used the most frequently in my woodworking endeavours. It was too hard to pick only 10 items out of the horde so I listed combinations as tools since that is how I use them!

        Ken

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        • #19

          Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

          Stir sticks as has been noted plus popsicle sticks and tongue depressors for such a variety of tasks; mixing glue/sawdust, epoxy, glue spreading.......
          Painters tape. How can we live in the shop without it?
          my 4" combo square and double square.
          Skew block plane
          The difference between a master and a beginner: The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

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          • #20

            Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

            Dental pics.... Don't laugh, I used them a lot to remove the crap off the set screws on my turning tools, Somebody on this forum was giving them away a few yrs ago, I wish I had kept his name, could use some more. lol..
            Jacques

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            • #21

              Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

              Camera phone, so i can remember how i set my jigs up last time

              Shop blower or can of compressed air

              Those short Bessey metal clamps with the 4” throat, all four of them

              2” wide chisel

              High beam bike headlight, cuz i’m going blind

              12 gauge extension cord

              1/2” foam insulation to stand on when on a concrete floor

              Toe warmer packs for when its -15C in the garage
              flairwoodworks likes this.

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              • #22

                Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                Maybe not all tools but useful items.
                Block of paraffin wax to lubricate screws when screwing into hardwoods or to lubricate drill bits or band saw blades
                Wooden stir sticks to spread glue on small glue ups or mortices or mix epoxy
                Wire cutters (side cutters) to cut the glue covered end off the wooden stir stick if I forget to wipe the glue off before it dries
                Yogurt container lid to mix small batches of epoxy
                Used prescription bottles to store small screws, router chucks etc.
                Elastic bands for small glue ups.
                Magnets for holding drill press chuck keys, posting notes, finding metal in workpieces, picking up dropped screws (magnets with extension holders)
                Hooks in the ceiling to keep hoses and cords off the floor and avoid tripping
                flairwoodworks likes this.

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                • #23

                  Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                  Originally posted by KenL View Post
                  7. 12 & 18 inch stainless steel flexible rulers
                  What do you use them for? I’ve never thought of an application for a flexible rule to justify buying one.
                  Chris Wong
                  http://flairwoodworks.com

                  If you have a hard time getting things perfectly level, maybe you need a First Guess Gravity Gauge.

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                  • #24

                    Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                    Tooth brush,apron plane,shark guard

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                    • #25

                      Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                      Originally posted by flairwoodworks View Post

                      What do you use them for? I’ve never thought of an application for a flexible rule to justify buying one.
                      I use Wescott brand rules which are very high quality made in USA tools. The cork backing makes them non-slip in use, especially so to use as a cutting/trimming guide for veneers, balsa, tape, etc. They are the best thing ever for measuring and layout on compound curves such as wing ribs; fuselages; boat and canoe frames (a 24 inch is particularly useful for the latter task) and are versatile layout and set-up tools for the table saw, lathe (a 6 inch is really handy at the metal lathe and there are occasions when the 4 inch one that I got from LV is even better suited) and so on. I have quite a few measuring tools but these Wescott rules are the most often used of the lot. They can substitute for French curves in gentle curved applications such as one finds in paddle blades and canoe frames too.

                      Does that illuminate the situation. Oh, and they are very accurate as well.

                      Ken

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                      • #26

                        Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                        So to add to the laser level I mentioned before here is what else I would suggest not ten but what I can think of.
                        1. Papermate Sharpwriter Mechanical Pencil has a shock-absorbing tip so leads don’t break and always sharp.
                        2. 6 “ Precision Double Square
                        3. Miter Square.
                        4. Fien multi-tool
                        Jerome
                        Canada's South Coast

                        Port Colborne On.
                        Every loaf of bread is a tragic tale of grains that could've become whiskey.......but didn't....

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                        • #27

                          Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                          KenL Your applications do make sense. When I’m working with curved surfaces, I usually am not concerned with drawing straight lines or making precise layout. I suppose that’s why I’ve never seen a need for one.

                          For cutting veneer, I like my heavy steel straightedge.
                          Chris Wong
                          http://flairwoodworks.com

                          If you have a hard time getting things perfectly level, maybe you need a First Guess Gravity Gauge.

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                          • #28

                            Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                            Originally posted by Jerome View Post
                            [*]Papermate Sharpwriter Mechanical Pencil has a shock-absorbing tip so leads don’t break and always sharp.
                            Wasn’t aware of this pencil. They’re cheap! $6.99... for a dozen!

                            https://www.staples.ca/products/2780...il-07mm-12pack
                            Chris Wong
                            http://flairwoodworks.com

                            If you have a hard time getting things perfectly level, maybe you need a First Guess Gravity Gauge.

                            Comment


                            • #29

                              Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                              Originally posted by flairwoodworks View Post

                              Wasn’t aware of this pencil. They’re cheap! $6.99... for a dozen!

                              https://www.staples.ca/products/2780...il-07mm-12pack
                              They are plastic and disposable which would be a show stopper for me. There is a hack on YouTube that shows how you can replace the lead and eraser.
                              KenL likes this.
                              Cheers
                              Randy

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                              • #30

                                Re: Top 10 Underrated Tools

                                Originally posted by Randy in Calgary View Post

                                They are plastic and disposable which would be a show stopper for me. There is a hack on YouTube that shows how you can replace the lead and eraser.
                                I agree wholeheartedly Randy! The 0.7mm lead is rather coarse too. I find that mechanical pencils with the 0.5mm lead are not the best in the shop because the lines are too coarse, especially for small parts (I have "professional"" quality draughtsman's pencils of this type and only use them for hack jobs/sketches!). I confess that I didn't know there was a YouTube "hack" to figure out how to pull the eraser out of a mechanical pencil; who knew!

                                Ken

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