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Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

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  • #61

    Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

    Originally posted by Frank D. View Post
    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5585.jpg Views:	1 Size:	3.83 MB ID:	1233391
    Sure you can touch it on heat shield, but you won't touch any part of the door nor the top.
    • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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    • #62

      Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

      Originally posted by redlee View Post

      Sure you can touch it on heat shield, but you won't touch any part of the door nor the top.
      Sure, but that's basically true of an electric cooking stove too, no?

      Sometimes children just have to be taught.

      It kinda goes back to that old debate about trying to "kidproof your world" or "world-proof your kid" .

      I don't let my kids into stupidly dangerous situations, but as a general rule I lean towards the latter.

      All our three kids have been taught not to touch the wood stove, not to play or rough house around it, to be careful when walking by, lest you trip, etc. They've all responded well, and we've had no incidents thus far. My 9 year old is even, as of this year, starting and tending fires on his own. He knows when to load in a new log, use the poker, adjust the damper, etc. It's amazing what kids can be capable of when they're just given a bit of training.

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      • #63

        Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

        Originally posted by callee View Post

        Sure, but that's basically true of an electric cooking stove too, no?

        Sometimes children just have to be taught.

        It kinda goes back to that old debate about trying to "kidproof your world" or "world-proof your kid" .

        I don't let my kids into stupidly dangerous situations, but as a general rule I lean towards the latter.

        All our three kids have been taught not to touch the wood stove, not to play or rough house around it, to be careful when walking by, lest you trip, etc. They've all responded well, and we've had no incidents thus far. My 9 year old is even, as of this year, starting and tending fires on his own. He knows when to load in a new log, use the poker, adjust the damper, etc. It's amazing what kids can be capable of when they're just given a bit of training.
        I disagree on the electric stove part, sides certainly don't get hot enough to burn you or you would have a house fire, front might with the oven.
        But all else you said i agree.
        • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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        • #64

          Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

          I have heated with woodstoves and with a wood/oil combination furnace. Stoves are great especially those that use outdoor air for combustion. Pacific Energy as I recall was the brand I had the best experience with.
          By far the best wood heating alternative IMO is the combination furnace. Seamless, even heat and using the furnace blower or an air exchanger for distribution makes a huge difference.
          The difference between a master and a beginner: The master has failed more times than the beginner has even tried.

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          • #65

            Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

            If you can move the heat any fire would work wouldn't it? We've all stood close to the bonfire until we had to turn away. It really isn'y rocket science.

            As for kids and getting hurt no one wants it to happen but that's why they call it accidental. It happens all the rime. None of you will purposely ignore the issue and that's why I brought it up but don't think for a minute that it can't happen to a visitor's kid if you think your kids are bullet proof just because you said; "don't touch." The right answer to those of us offering a very mild warning is a polite thank you and that comment is not meant to illicit an argument BTW.
            "Do it Right!"

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            • #66

              Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

              The thing to look for in a wood burner is the baffle and what it is made from and how easy to replace once it burns out, as it will. Without it your heat is just shooting up and out. Glass wash is also great and come via those perforated pipes under the baffle.

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              • #67

                Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                Originally posted by Jim near the Tay View Post

                Rusty, due to concerns with radon gas in basements it is recommended by HRAI (the industry design institute) to only size return air intakes in basements to 50 percent of the air supplied to the basement. Of course the homeowner can do whatever he or she wants. Heating contractors are supposed to follow the HRAI design guidelines.

                Jim





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                When we had our furnace and heat pump installed the first thing the company did was put in bigger cold air return ducts. They said inadequately sized cold air returns compromise furnace efficiency and are a common problem. We also keep our basement door ajar to improve air flow.

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                • #68

                  Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                  I have a pacific energy super 27, I'm guessing 20 years old.two years ago I rebuilt it with factory parts,was very reasonable and ready for anouther decade or more.
                  very efficient,strongly recommend

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                  • #69

                    Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                    Originally posted by dwoody View Post

                    When we had our furnace and heat pump installed the first thing the company did was put in bigger cold air return ducts. They said inadequately sized cold air returns compromise furnace efficiency and are a common problem. We also keep our basement door ajar to improve air flow.
                    You are correct Mr. Woody. Rusty was recommending more return air inflow from the basement. The HRAI recommends keeping basement return airflow at about 50 percent of the supply air flow to the basement. In the rest of the house you would install extra return air capacity to overcome the deficit from the basement.

                    The idea is that with a basement door closed to the upstairs you might draw some radon gas into the system. This would only be an issue if there was radon gas present and if the return air inlets were oversized for the basement and if the basement was more or less sealed off from the rest of the house by having the basement door closed and with little undercut.

                    Jim


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                    • #70

                      Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                      Jim my point is after a lifetime of building houses with basements that are normally undeveloped it is my contention that they are woefully under done when it comes to return air circulation from new rooms cut out of a typical wide open space. You can disagree but to do so I can almost guarantee that you will be cold in the basement. As far as the radon is concerned it may not even exist but that's a point for someone else to discuss. I can't help you there.
                      "Do it Right!"

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                      • #71

                        Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                        Originally posted by Rusty View Post
                        Jim my point is after a lifetime of building houses with basements that are normally undeveloped it is my contention that they are woefully under done when it comes to return air circulation from new rooms cut out of a typical wide open space. You can disagree but to do so I can almost guarantee that you will be cold in the basement. As far as the radon is concerned it may not even exist but that's a point for someone else to discuss. I can't help you there.
                        if time was taken to actually read Jims posts one would see Jim himself isn't disagreeing, he is stating what "HRAI (the industry design institute)" advises. (post 51 if one cared to read again).

                        he also states "Heating contractors are supposed to follow the HRAI design guidelines" obviously you're familiar with these guidelines, being an HVAC contractor.


                        I'm curious about your claim that radon "may not even exist"?
                        Last edited by beakie; 04-16-2019, 06:36 AM.
                        [insert something witty here]

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                        • #72

                          Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                          Originally posted by Rusty View Post
                          Jim my point is after a lifetime of building houses with basements that are normally undeveloped it is my contention that they are woefully under done when it comes to return air circulation from new rooms cut out of a typical wide open space. You can disagree but to do so I can almost guarantee that you will be cold in the basement. As far as the radon is concerned it may not even exist but that's a point for someone else to discuss. I can't help you there.
                          I agree that basements will be colder in a one zone heating system Rusty. Typically you will have ceiling outlets in the basement controlled by a thermostat control located on the main floor. It is not possible to have the upstairs and the basement comfortable with such a system. A zoned system or a two furnace system or auxiliary heat in the basement such as electric baseboard or radiant heat in the floor are possible cures. As for whether Radon gas exists, I will let you decide that yourself.


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                          • #73

                            Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                            Originally posted by beakie View Post

                            if time was taken to actually read Jims posts one would see Jim himself isn't disagreeing, he is stating what "HRAI (the industry design institute)" advises. (post 51 if one cared to read again).

                            he also states "Heating contractors are supposed to follow the HRAI design guidelines" obviously you're familiar with these guidelines, being an HVAC contractor.


                            I'm curious about your claim that radon "may not even exist"?
                            I'm not disagreeing with Jim at all. I'm not an HVAC contractor, I'm a builfder. I hire HVAC contractors to follow the rules and provide inspection certificates that allow me to get and give occupancy stickers to new home purchasers.

                            Curiosity is not what prompted your response Tom.
                            "Do it Right!"

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                            • #74

                              Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                              Originally posted by Jim near the Tay View Post

                              I agree that basements will be colder in a one zone heating system Rusty. Typically you will have ceiling outlets in the basement controlled by a thermostat control located on the main floor. It is not possible to have the upstairs and the basement comfortable with such a system. A zoned system or a two furnace system or auxiliary heat in the basement such as electric baseboard or radiant heat in the floor are possible cures. As for whether Radon gas exists, I will let you decide that yourself.


                              Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
                              Jim I know very little about Radon that's why I said; "i can't help you there."

                              You can and i certainly do heat houses including my own with one furnace and proper balance and return air inlets installed at the floor level of the basement. You or anyone else is welcome to come and see what I do in accordance with my contractors and the codes. I do not in any way dispute most of your input. It is very sound in my opinion. If you have a friend who could look for you or are contemplating a visit here come and look. My basement is as comfortable as my main floor. I have also installed 2 furnace systems in 2 storey homes here. It's all about balance and air movement. My furnace fan has run continually for over 30 years. I have no auxiliary heat source in my house.I do have a furnace that was sized properly to do the job.

                              Should we entertain the OP's subject again?
                              "Do it Right!"

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                              • #75

                                Re: Should I buy an older Wood Stove?

                                I agree Rusty, sorry for the interruption.

                                Jim


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