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  • #16

    Re: Dang

    Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
    I think you need to top up you thermometer,it seems to be running low
    I actually need a better one , I've seen it below -40 .
    • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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    • #17

      Re: Dang

      That's an odd thermometer, I always thought -32 F = -32 C. Cold is COLD it's noon and still -36 C at Edmonton airport

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      • #18

        Re: Dang

        Checked it out, 40=40

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        • #19

          Re: Dang

          Aw come on.
          It's Alberta in the winter.
          That's what you expect.
          I, on the other hand have to deal with 4, humid, and cloudy, and am not liking it.

          Noel
          John@Hamilton likes this.
          Noel

          "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
          'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
          "

          John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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          • #20

            Re: Dang

            I hear you Richard! I moved to Cold Lake with a mercury thermometer that went down to -40C/F and found out that wasn't sufficient range to be safe. I bought a bimetallic one that went to -50C and found out that didn't always quite cut it either; close but no cigar. The one in my car would hang with you to -60C (-75F approx.) and I never saw it colder than -52C at ground level in Cold Lake. That God Awful cold could be convenient sometimes in the flight test business because we could cold-soak aircraft instrumentation systems right on the apron by the hangars and correct snags/wring them out without burning up time and fuel flying!! Otherwise; I can see no upside to it!

            -40C/F is a pretty sporty temperature for those in the crowd who have no experience with such things; it hurts to be out in that. Concur with Richard's comment above: "Dry cold my A__!

            Ken

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            • #21

              Re: Dang

              Originally posted by beachburl View Post
              Aw come on.
              It's Alberta in the winter.
              That's what you expect.
              I, on the other hand have to deal with 4, humid, and cloudy, and am not liking it.

              Noel
              Yup I’ve been here a long time and we expect winter.
              But -40 is getting harder to take as I age.
              stotto, Redneck Albertan and 2 others like this.
              • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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              • #22

                Re: Dang

                Originally posted by beachburl View Post
                Aw come on.
                It's Alberta in the winter.
                That's what you expect.
                I, on the other hand have to deal with 4, humid, and cloudy, and am not liking it.

                Noel
                Yup I’ve been here a long time and we expect winter.
                But -40 is getting harder to take as I age.
                Redneck Albertan likes this.
                • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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                • #23

                  Re: Dang

                  When I worked in the high arctic we did not take vehicles out at minus 50 because the tires could break. Minus 20 was balmy when the sun was out and the wind was still.
                  Rob

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                  • #24

                    Re: Dang

                    Minus right now and the day before yesterday 18-22 inches of snow lol..

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                    • #25

                      Re: Dang

                      Ya, that's cold.

                      I once went to Rochester Minnesota and when we landed it was -40 the next day it was 32.
                      Steve The Drill Sergeant
                      Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

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                      • #26

                        Re: Dang

                        Originally posted by KenL View Post
                        That God Awful cold could be convenient sometimes in the flight test business because we could cold-soak aircraft instrumentation systems right on the apron by the hangars and correct snags/wring them out without burning up time and fuel flying!! Otherwise; I can see no upside to it!

                        Ken
                        I bet you'd have some interesting stories! I'm trying in vain though to understand what exactly you're describing here; I just don't know enough about the subject - what exactly does this mean?

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                        • #27

                          Re: Dang

                          Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
                          When I worked in the high arctic we did not take vehicles out at minus 50 because the tires could break. Minus 20 was balmy when the sun was out and the wind was still.
                          Rob
                          CFB Wainwright in the early '80s, me and a sergeant were out in the middle of nowhere, -50 and a howling wind. The diesel in our armoured personnel carrier turned to jelly and the batteries crapped out. We stayed with the vehicle but that thing became a 13-ton magnesium icebox until we got towed out the next afternoon. The infantry had good winter clothing back then, and if I recall correctly we may also have had a bottle of issue rum. Good times.

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                          • #28

                            Re: Dang

                            Originally posted by callee View Post

                            I bet you'd have some interesting stories! I'm trying in vain though to understand what exactly you're describing here; I just don't know enough about the subject - what exactly does this mean?
                            That would require a rather lengthy and involved explanation but it begins with the fact that aircraft flight test instrumentation systems were usually one-ofs. Despite assertions you may have read that electronics are immune to the cold, they are not and the only way to find out for sure is to get them really cold and do end to end testing to ensure that they are behaving as designed/intended to work. Other aspects of the instrumentation such as adhesives, wiring and plumbing can be temperature sensitive too. So the way we "qualified" each particular set-up was to cold soak it IE let it reach a very low ambient temperature then run a series of performance tests on it to try to find out if performance was degraded; adhesive bonds were broken, wiring had pulled loose from connectors and a myriad of other cold induced failures that seem a bit far-fetched unless they are part of your bread and butter core business.

                            Does that help? I sometimes forget that the argot of the flight test world is not familiar to everyone and drop into it too readily. Sorry about that.

                            Ken


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                            • #29

                              Re: Dang

                              Checked the temperature this morning my thermometer said -5 but it is actually closer to -40 again.
                              I think it’s broke, frozen, gave up the ghost.
                              • “The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes.”Winston Churchill

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                              • #30

                                Re: Dang

                                Originally posted by KenL View Post

                                That would require a rather lengthy and involved explanation but it begins with the fact that aircraft flight test instrumentation systems were usually one-ofs. Despite assertions you may have read that electronics are immune to the cold, they are not and the only way to find out for sure is to get them really cold and do end to end testing to ensure that they are behaving as designed/intended to work. Other aspects of the instrumentation such as adhesives, wiring and plumbing can be temperature sensitive too. So the way we "qualified" each particular set-up was to cold soak it IE let it reach a very low ambient temperature then run a series of performance tests on it to try to find out if performance was degraded; adhesive bonds were broken, wiring had pulled loose from connectors and a myriad of other cold induced failures that seem a bit far-fetched unless they are part of your bread and butter core business.

                                Does that help? I sometimes forget that the argot of the flight test world is not familiar to everyone and drop into it too readily. Sorry about that.

                                Ken

                                Oh, no apologies needed, thats really quite interesting. I think I was most thrown off by the phrase "cold soak" , which I interpreted literally and pictured you hosing down airplanes with water in -50! What planes did you work on?

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