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  • Morning Smiles

    Morning smiles or not. First two are from the Metalworking Drop Box, you may have smiled before.

    Darn fuel tank keeps leaking.

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    oops one box to many.

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    Its coming.

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  • #2

    Re: Morning Smiles

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    • #3

      Re: Morning Smiles

      Callee, hey if it works why not, .

      HELP, I went to sleep last night and woke up in Newfoundland.

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      • #4

        Re: Morning Smiles

        One sees pics like this from time to time, but it never gets less shocking. And that 45* corner in the baseboard; someone went to as much work doing it that way as it would to do it right.
        beachburl likes this.

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        • #5

          Re: Morning Smiles

          Originally posted by Carlosinthesticks View Post
          HELP, I went to sleep last night and woke up in Newfoundland.
          Did you actually get a lot of snow? Or did it just blow around and build up drifts? It looked like we got a pile too, and my walkways looked like yours, but I have a sawmill yard about three km from my house and the sawmill yard gets zero wind so it shows the real snowfall amounts. I had to go over there today to get a chainsaw, and here's how much snow we really got ....

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          • #6

            Re: Morning Smiles

            Lucky you John . The forecast was for 25 cm. I got closer to 30 and the drifts around the house and shops are at window height. It happens, Kirkland Lake often gets buried and I get very little, It helps that I am just over the Arctic watershed, the high point but with a wind driven storm that don't help much. It come down for 36 hrs. non-stop here.

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            • #7

              Re: Morning Smiles

              I'm afraid if I post pictures of my front yard with the crocuses in full bloom you'll hate me forever so I'll just wish you happy plowing!

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              • #8

                Re: Morning Smiles

                35 cm, this morning, but no wind since I am surronding with trees lol..

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                • #9

                  Re: Morning Smiles

                  Originally posted by Jacques Leclerc View Post
                  35 cm, this morning, but no wind since I am surronding with trees lol..
                  That can be very nice but in todays world it carries a heavy risk. Untill 10 years ago the woods were close to the house and I got alot less drifting and had a certain appeal. Then freaking North America started to burn down. I retired around then and the first thing I did was open up the area around the house to about 8 acres and do some heavy landscaping. Not going to save me in a fire storm but there is a better chance it will survive in a local fire.

                  Its like grinding and cutting metal on woodworking machinery. Know matter how good your DC system works, or you clean your machine, there are going to be pockets of fine dust packed into corners and blind spots. When you cut or grind steel there are going to be sparks that get into the tight spots and start smoldering, when you come back from supper your shop is on fire. I have read about exactly one such situation.

                  The point is if you know the risk why take the chance but to each his own.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Morning Smiles

                    All done. Who says Craftsman tractors are powder puffs . This 23 horse has been clearing blizzards for 19 years now, the Bercomac blower has had 2 rebuilds in that time and is due for a third this summer but the powder puff keeps on chugging along .

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                    • #11

                      Re: Morning Smiles

                      Originally posted by Carlosinthesticks View Post

                      That can be very nice but in todays world it carries a heavy risk. Untill 10 years ago the woods were close to the house and I got alot less drifting and had a certain appeal. Then freaking North America started to burn down. I retired around then and the first thing I did was open up the area around the house to about 8 acres and do some heavy landscaping. Not going to save me in a fire storm but there is a better chance it will survive in a local fire.

                      Its like grinding and cutting metal on woodworking machinery. Know matter how good your DC system works, or you clean your machine, there are going to be pockets of fine dust packed into corners and blind spots. When you cut or grind steel there are going to be sparks that get into the tight spots and start smoldering, when you come back from supper your shop is on fire. I have read about exactly one such situation.

                      The point is if you know the risk why take the chance but to each his own.
                      I read that having a steel roof really reduces your risk. Apparently a lot of the houses go up when a blowing ember lands on the asphalt roof.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Morning Smiles

                        Originally posted by callee View Post

                        I read that having a steel roof really reduces your risk. Apparently a lot of the houses go up when a blowing ember lands on the asphalt roof.
                        Yup, steel's the best in fire-prone areas. Besides fire resistance it tends to attract less buildup of leaf litter & evergreen needles, which is what the embers look for. And cedar is the worst. In recent mega-fires crews have gone house-to-house and didn't even try to protect cedar-shingled houses with sprinklers or hose-downs. I understand the logic: if a subdivision has 8 homes with asphalt or steel roofs and 2 with cedar, use your limited resources to protect the ones that stand the best chance of being saved.
                        Last edited by Greg_Hansen61; 03-01-2020, 07:05 PM.

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                        • #13

                          Re: Morning Smiles

                          My shingle roof is 19 years now, new roof on the house is in the works this summer or next. A metal roof is very high up on the list of options. The biggest drawback I understand is the noise in a hailstorm.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Morning Smiles

                            Originally posted by Carlosinthesticks View Post

                            ...the first thing I did was open up the area around the house to about 8 acres and do some heavy landscaping. Not going to save me in a fire storm but there is a better chance it will survive in a local fire...
                            You might be surprised Carlos. They've been doing a lot of post-mortems on interface fires in heavily forested areas and the steps you've taken have proved to be very effective. Wildland firefighters call it creating a 'defensible space' around buildings. My place is surrounded by mature fir that would go up like a nuke in fire season, so I've been gradually cutting that and any other combustibles back to give myself a fighting chance. I have a pond-fed pump and line ready to go on a moment's notice in summer, and sprinklers are the next step -- also proven very effective.

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                            • #15

                              Re: Morning Smiles

                              Now a days you never know Greg. Last few years it has been the west, must make you pretty nervous, it would me, if dry droughts start to move east we could be next. I have a very deep well and the water table is only down 25', If I have to run for it, the sprinkler will be left on the roof, it will run till either the power gets turned off or the line burns down, the batteries won't last long on 220.

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