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  • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

    I had my Moderna vaccination shot yesterday, went pretty fast, they had 4 persons doing the injections, took just a few minutes for all the questions before given the injection, and then the 15 minute wait before letting us go out, haven't noticed anything from the injection at all.

    We have a couple older friends (93 and 94) and they were given the injections at home as they have a hard time travelling by themselves and walking any distance as well, so it was nice they did get the vaccine at home.
    iamtooler, Brian @ Muir and 3 others like this.

    Have fun and take care
    Leo Van Der Loo

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    • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

      Interesting that CDC is suggesting that Americans avoid travel to Canada due to our low vaccination rate. They list Canada as 59th in the world for the percentage of people that have been vaccinated. Not a lot to be proud of as we enter another 4 weeks of lock down in Ontario.

      Brian
      If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

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      • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

        Given the way the US is ignoring CDC guidelines (40,000 spectators at Texas Rangers game, many without masks, highest air travel since the pandemic started etc) I wouldn't travel there either (even if I could) nor would I want them travelling here. But yes our vaccine rollout is very disappointing.

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        • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

          My wife and I got the chance to go over everything Ive ever done wrong, and she's been tasking me with all sorts of things so we got lots done at first, but over the course of the year I developed "heard immunity" It's been quite peaceful around there since, although a lot less is being accomplished. ;-)
          dwoody likes this.

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          • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

            The COVID-19 vaccine deployment has been a cock-up of the highest (that should probably be the lowest) order IMO. Canada's response to contain the spread worked fairly well initially but then faltered and the vaccination game has been pathetic to say the least. We are now scheduled to vaccinate a third tranche of senior and near senior citizens (those between 60 and 70 years) months after vaccines became available on the open market.

            Even the language used to describe the vaccination program seems intended to obfuscate rather than inform an anxious Public. Does anyone know how the H--L a vaccination program became a roll-out? That particular term is jargon for the initial release of a new to the market aircraft (for example) when the first one is rolled out of the hangar for public display! Sorry, I digress but it seems to me that using terms like that (not unfamiliar to people in my profession but hardly intended to portray a wide-spread immunization program) is a means of making something really simple that is done every year (influenza vaccination program) seem mysterious, exotic and therefore somehow much more challenging to accomplish while excusing the the stupidly long time that it took to get this "organized". This is not rocket science folks.

            All of this was impeded by the lack of supply of vaccines, granted, and that is a stain on our national preparedness, but the politicking and plain old baffle the Public with BS is appalling! After all of that, they still have only addressed about 12% of the population of the Province, and really don't know when that will get rectified!

            Okay, rant over for now.

            Ken

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            • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

              They said on the news Kitchener had multiple hotspots and anyone 50 and over can book a shot. Guess what Im one street out side of the hotspot. Ticks me off. I have an artificial heart valve and it doesn't qualify me for a shot yet. So stupid. Just open the bloody shots up already. At the rate they are going it will be sept before I can get one. I am high risk already. But I still don't qualify.
              KenL likes this.
              https://www.facebook.com/gregsreinventions2016/

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              • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                I'm 70 and I finally got my 1st shot today but then I do live in the middle of nowhere

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                • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                  Originally posted by KenL View Post
                  The COVID-19 vaccine deployment has been a cock-up of the highest (that should probably be the lowest) order IMO. Canada's response to contain the spread worked fairly well initially but then faltered and the vaccination game has been pathetic to say the least. We are now scheduled to vaccinate a third tranche of senior and near senior citizens (those between 60 and 70 years) months after vaccines became available on the open market.

                  Even the language used to describe the vaccination program seems intended to obfuscate rather than inform an anxious Public. Does anyone know how the H--L a vaccination program became a roll-out? That particular term is jargon for the initial release of a new to the market aircraft (for example) when the first one is rolled out of the hangar for public display! Sorry, I digress but it seems to me that using terms like that (not unfamiliar to people in my profession but hardly intended to portray a wide-spread immunization program) is a means of making something really simple that is done every year (influenza vaccination program) seem mysterious, exotic and therefore somehow much more challenging to accomplish while excusing the the stupidly long time that it took to get this "organized". This is not rocket science folks.

                  All of this was impeded by the lack of supply of vaccines, granted, and that is a stain on our national preparedness, but the politicking and plain old baffle the Public with BS is appalling! After all of that, they still have only addressed about 12% of the population of the Province, and really don't know when that will get rectified!

                  Okay, rant over for now.

                  Ken
                  My favourite was all the " pilot projects" for example, giving shots at pharmacies, etc. To my mind a "pilot project" is when you implement an idea on a small scale in order to test it's merit and work out any kinks so that you don't have problems on the large scale. In normal times, that would make perfect sense. But these are, we've been continually told, urgent unprecedented times, so why on earth would they waste time on pilot projects? What kinks could they hope to avoid that wouldn't be surpassed in detriment by the ongoing damage of limiting the, ahem, roll out? I mean, they keep invoking the war analogy, so I'll run with it: when Hitler crossed the line, did they say "let's put together a pilot project army to see how that works before we ramp up to full enlistment" ?
                  KenL and Redneck Albertan like this.

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                  • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                    A lot of the complaints here would be valid if there was a steady supply of vaccine. There is not and every country is competing for a limited supply of a new product. Contracts are not being honoured.
                    timberframe likes this.

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                    • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                      Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
                      A lot of the complaints here would be valid if there was a steady supply of vaccine. There is not and every country is competing for a limited supply of a new product. Contracts are not being honoured.
                      Canada purchased more doses per capita than any country in the world, but more from Europe because of fears of US protectionism, which were founded considering Trump said "USA first" and Biden hasn't changed it. Now the European manufacturers are not supplying as they should have, but Ontario has more vials coming in than they can use apparently. More shots coming in per week than they can shoot people with....
                      Proud member of the Wadkin Blockhead Club.

                      http://www.youtube.com/c/DovetailTimberworks

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                      • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                        The problem with the vaccine is some (please note I said SOME) people get it and think they are superman and start living their lives as they used to as can be seen by the increase in the number of people travelling in the US. I don't know that there is any proof that it prevents them from carrying it which means those "supermen" type are still potentially spreading it to those of us that have not had it and jeopardizing our health.

                        Without getting too political (I'm not supporting one party or the other) it is a no win situation when you look back at what has and hasn't happened in Canada or even provincially. In Ontario it doesn't matter what he does the opposition complains. Shut down and they blame him for all of the small businesses that we are losing but if he leaves things open (which I believe he did too long this time) then he gets blamed because of all the sick people and the rise in cases. I see it in town here already only 2 days into the new lockdown. Facebook is full of posts complaining Walmart has all the nonessential blocked off yet every other shutdown people complained because Walmart was allowed to keep the whole store open. No win situation for anybody. I wish those complaining would offer up solutions if they don't like the current situation instead of constantly criticizing every little move.
                        Jerome, Kayak Jim and 6 others like this.
                        Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

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                        • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                          I'm 72 and I got my shot yesterday afternoon, so far no side effects other than slightly sore injection site, no worse than any other vaccination, I got the Pfizer. The process was reasonably organized but there were a few things of note. As I posted earlier, I called and booked my appointment one week ago on the first day my age group was eligible, it took three tries to get thru and I was on hold about 20 minutes when I finally got thru. I was asked a few questions including where (what city) I wanted the appointment. So that part was reasonable. The first two locations had no availabilities which I thought was odd, not no availability in the next week just no availability period. The third city had availability the following week and I was given an appointment. When I looked up the site I discovered it was a drive thru which was fine with me but I thought it odd that wasn't mentioned as it might not work for some. (On the day there were some walk-ins at the site) After I booked I got a text confirming my appointment and giving me a reference number and the day before my appointment I got a second text with a reminder and a QR code and telling me what to bring, all good. When I arrived they didn't ask for either the reference number or QR code but instead gave me a form to fill out (all the info on the form they already had or could have collected when I booked, luckily my wife had a pencil so I filled out the form on my knee, maybe it was legible).
                          All together we were there about 45 minutes including the 15 minutes after to ensure I had no reaction. Not bad but if they had just scanned the QR code, asked a few questions like are you feeling well today, it could have been half that time. Not sure if it was typical, but it didn't seem busy and with two lanes for shots, I don't think they were doing much more than dozen shots per hour. A third lane was doing tests and probably did twice that number. So all together not a terrible experience but certainly room for improvement.

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                          • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                            I just got home from my popsicle jab (Pfizer ).
                            Booked it online 3 weeks or so ago. No wait at the door. In and out in 25 minutes including the 15. Could have been out a few minutes sooner but I was chatting and joking around with the nurse.
                            No idea when Jab Part Deux will be.
                            Heard on the radio this morning they are booking 50 to 54 year olds in the north of the province and 55+ in the south now.

                            Pete

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                            • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                              Originally posted by jaywood1207 View Post
                              I wish those complaining would offer up solutions if they don't like the current situation instead of constantly criticizing every little move.
                              As far as I can really see, there's really only three options:

                              1) Extreme lock down - absolutely everything is shuttered, everyone is absolutely confined to their residence, borders are utterly closed.

                              2) Extreme liberty. Inform the public, give all the info so they can make an informed choice, then just let everyone do what they want. If they choose to risk going out, then that's their choice. If their choice leads to their death, then so be it.

                              3) moderate restrictions. An attempt to find a middle ground between the other two. Make some degree of lock down and restrictions on activity, but only to the degree necessary to minimise transmission.


                              I can think of ways to slightly tweak all three of those options, but I can't imagine any fundamentally different fourth option.

                              Of those three options,

                              The first was demonstrated in China - where robots literally roamed the streets to ensure people stayed in their homes - and arguably Australia and New Zealand.

                              Undeniably this strategy is the most effective at the singular goal of stopping transmission, and there's a real argument to be made that it would have been cheaper too - since having a government bailout for one month of even 100% economic carnage would probably still be cheaper than 14 months of government bailout for partial economic damage. That is, one month at even 100% is still less dollars than 14 months at 20%.

                              ​​​​​that said, it was easier for both those countries to pursue that strategy than it would be for us. Australia and NZ are islands, so it's very easy to shut everyone else out. China is not an island, but they are a totalitarian state that can flex that kind of muscle. Here in the West we are not an island and we have a heritage of liberty that would make it very difficult for the government to impose that level of control.

                              The second option, extreme liberty, has allegedly been demonstrated by states like Florida, and the claims are that their ultimate mortality rates were no worse, which would be an argument in this options favour. I think that data needs more scrutiny yet. All the same, the real concern with this option is moral, as we discussed above. Some groups, namely seniors and poor essential workers, have no choice about their exposure level, so if those groups are forced to be in the public sphere there is a moral argument to be made that we have a duty to keep that public sphere safe. I think that's an argument that has yet to be fully resolved though.

                              Finally, the moderate option is what our government has tried, and frankly unless you're in a position like new Zealand where you can easily do option one, this moderate option is probably the best balance.

                              The problem comes, I think, in the execution. It seems obvious to me that the restrictions should be well thought out and targeted at the spots that need it the most or where they will do the most good. The colour coded regional approach was, I think, actually a half decent way of doing that.

                              On average about 3/4 of the cases every day come from the GTA and broader southern Ontario. Clearly those regions need much stricter restrictions. Not surprisingly, polling shows that about 3/4 of Ontario's population - roughly the population of that region - are in favour of such restrictions. So obviously the plan to treat that region differently is a good one.


                              The problem with the Ontario government is that they introduced their own colour coded plan and then proceeded to ignore their own plan. They lock down areas that, according to their own plan, are in no need of lock down.

                              in a way I can see why he did it: the GTA was already shut down. The only new thing he could have done was impose extreme, China level restrictions on the GTA. Obviously he's not willing to be that strict, but he also doesn't want to appear to be doing nothing, so locking down the rest of the province allows him to look like he's taking some action. So I can see the politics of why he did it. But when you have the premiere telling far flung Northern regions with no cases that it's necessary to close and destroy their businesses, that's just robbing the government of any credibility they had. And when the government destroys their own credibility, that's just encouraging scofflaws.

                              I know where I am I have often heard people in the last week say something along the lines of "I gave him the benefit of the doubt last year, but I'm done trusting Doug Ford."

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                              • Re: COVID-19 vaccine

                                In this day and age option 2 has zero chance of success in my opinion. There are too many people (and with a serious highly contagious deadly disease you only need a few) that would rather believe a Facebook post or their favorite conspiracy theory website than any government or health official. Look at the number of people who refuse to wear masks because they claim it will cause you to breath your own CO2 and cause you harm or that we shouldn't shut down for Covid19 because more people die from car accidents, cancer or heart disease or they refuse a vaccine because they claim Bill Gates is trying to control the world by injecting Nano chips in us. In a free society, option 2 is the preferred option to convince people not to do something that only harms them but when their action harms others because they refuse to believe the health experts then it won't be effective. A good example is smoking, you can try to educate people but let them smoke and kill themselves if they choose, however you need an authoritarian approach to prevent them from killing others with their second hand smoke.
                                That said, option 1 would be impossible in our free society even though it would save thousands of lives.

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