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  • Email Scam

    Just got a message supposedly from my sister that she was mugged in Spain and only has passport. Didn't ask for money. English was fairly good but didnt' sound like her except for last sentence and nickname.

    Cousin got same message and replied and got a "wire $1975 by Western Union and send confirmation number" message. She didn't.

    If any sister was likely to be in some country and get mugged it would be her but it was a scam.

    billh
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  • #2

    Re: Email Scam

    Re: Email Scam

    Scary stuff. They know who your sister and cousin are. Are you guys on Facebook?

    K.
    The more I learn, the better I understand how little I know.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Email Scam

      Re: Email Scam

      I heard of these going around a time ago. You have to think now that everyone carrys travelers checks or interact so you know they can get reimburst if they were actually traveling.
      Murray

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Email Scam

        Re: Email Scam

        We had the exact same thing just before Christmas Bill. My wife's hotmail was hacked, password changed & taken over. Supposedly, were were held at gunpoint & robbed of our money & credit cards while on vacation. Think it was Spain as well. All my wifes contacts in hotmail were sent the message (from her supposedly) please help us as we cannot settle our hotel bill & our flight is leaving soon kinda thing. Please send money thru western union, let me know if you are going to Western union NOW! 2000 Euros if I remember right! She even had all her facebook contacts deleted as you need your email account to have a facebook account. She is now with Gmail.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Email Scam

          Re: Email Scam

          We aren't on Facebook and I don't think my sister is either. I did hear of similar scam being run via Facebook recently usually targetted more directly to grandparents and relatives which are easier to identify with the info on many Facebook pages.

          billh

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Email Scam

            Re: Email Scam

            Originally posted by billh View Post
            We aren't on Facebook and I don't think my sister is either. I did hear of similar scam being run via Facebook recently usually targetted more directly to grandparents and relatives which are easier to identify with the info on many Facebook pages.

            billh
            Ed cleared it up for me. They gained access to her e-mail account. Which makes sense, they'd need to be able to receive your responses.

            It's a shame those type of people exist.

            Kevin
            The more I learn, the better I understand how little I know.

            Comment

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            • #7

              Re: Email Scam

              Re: Email Scam

              I got this yesterday...

              "I'm writing this with tears in my eyes, Mike and I came down to London, United Kingdom for a short vacation. Unfortunately, we got mugged at the park of the hotel where we stayed,all cash and credit cards were stolen off us but luckily for us, we still have our passports safe.

              We've been to the the Police here but they're not helping issues at all and our return flight leaves in few hours from now but we're having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won't let us leave until we settle the bills. Well, we really need your financial assistance..

              Please let me know if you can help us out?

              We're freaked out at the moment !!!

              Allison"

              idiots didn't leave any contact info or amount needed...I guess if they have control of the email account they would just wait for my reply that I could help..
              When someone tells you it can't be done, it's a reflection of their limitations, not yours.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Email Scam

                Re: Email Scam

                Exactly the same wording used for us Lisa! I obviously got the scam email from my wife's email account after she was hacked. One of my wife's contacts responded to the email, that's how we got the western union info! This is the original message!


                I'm writing this with tears in my eye, my family and I came down here to SPAIN,for a short vacation and got mugged at the park of the hotel we stayed, all our cash, credit card and Cell Phone were stolen off us at GUN POINT but luckily for us we still have our passports with us but don't have enough money to sort the bills so we can get out of here.

                We've been to the embassy and the police here but they're not helping issues at all and our round flight leaves soon but we're having problems settling the hotel bills, and the hotel manager won't let us leave until we settle the bills, I'm freaked out at the moment and wondering if you could help us with a quick loan, I promise I'll refund it once we get home.Please write me so i can send you the info for the wire of the money to save me from the embarrassment of not being able to cover the bills.
                Last edited by ed on manitoulin; 05-31-2011, 10:39 AM. Reason: add info

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                • #9

                  Re: Email Scam

                  Re: Email Scam

                  And here I was upset with my wife last night for having gotten sucked into some online contest whereby she entered her cell phone number and a $10 "Premium Text" charge showed up on our bill. We never text, nor is texting enabled on our BB's. I even had to get our wireless carrier to re-enable texting and further get them to step me thru the process of sending the XXXXSTOP text so it didn't happen again. Lousy bleepin' CyberCrooks!!! Obviously could have been much worse.

                  A friend/client I know got scammed last fall into sending $20K by wire transfer to buy a car on a fake Ebay site. Now that hurts!!!


                  EDIT: And watch out for Spanish Cucumbers!!!!

                  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13597080
                  Last edited by Lost in the Woods; 05-31-2011, 11:05 AM.
                  Kevin

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Email Scam

                    Re: Email Scam

                    So, let's see, you were mugged, robbed, yada, yada and are in dire straits and the best you can do is send an email and wait for a reply for days or even weeks. If a family member was in trouble, the first thing I would expect is a phone call - and since they supposedly visited the embassy, surely the Canadian Government could have sprung for the cost of a phone call.

                    Too much of this going on these days. It seems you can't trust much these days. Where financial transactions are involved it is so important that YOU initiate the action - not respond to some unsolicited email. I've had a number of "your account needs some kind of attention" at work - from banks I don't have accounts with - the emails had all the logos, proper fonts, good eenglish, etc - but when you examine the url and compare it with the official bank url, there is usually some subtle change like a single character or number changed - that sends it off to the spammer's site where they will probably ask you to provide your name, address, account number and of course....... the pin number.

                    So far, Cucumbers 14 dead, 1100 to 1200 ill. Terrible. I think I read too many spy novels and I'm beginning to imagine a back story behind this. And nobody knows where the problem originated. Bad day for the salad folks and even worse for the farmers

                    What a world we live in - Americans facing a huge financial crisis, almost the entire middle east destabilized, now most of Europe closing borders to trade and produce because nobody know where the contamination comes from - of even if multiple sources....YIKES - BACK to my spy novels - at least I know they are fiction .... or are they?
                    Nothing is ever as straightforward as it seems.

                    Glenn from Winnipeg

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Email Scam

                      Re: Email Scam

                      This was the response from the hackers we encountered! They could not make it very believable!

                      I am very glad to read from you,am dead serious. its true all i need now is EURO 2,000 And you can get it wire to my name via Western union because western union money transfer is the only way i can get any money now and the hotel management won`t let go of me except i settle the dept, And i can make use of my passport for verification here at western union outlet in Scotland.
                      This is the details you need at western union location to make the transfer to me and i promise to refund the money back as soon as i get back home.


                      NAME:Your name here
                      Location-453 St Andrew Square.
                      Edinburgh Scotland EH2 2YB



                      AMOUNT SENT-EURO 2,000: Please do get back to me with the Western Union Control Number M.T.C.N# or scanned receipt For Payment to be pick up once you have it done.
                      Let me know if you are heading to the Western Union location now?
                      Last edited by ed on manitoulin; 05-31-2011, 01:19 PM. Reason: missed info

                      Comment

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                      • #12

                        Re: Email Scam

                        Re: Email Scam

                        Originally posted by ed on manitoulin View Post
                        This was the response from the hackers we encountered! They could not make it very believable!

                        I am very glad to read from you,am dead serious. its true all i need now is EURO 2,000 And you can get it wire to my name via Western union because western union money transfer is the only way i can get any money now and the hotel management won`t let go of me except i settle the dept, And i can make use of my passport for verification here at western union outlet in Scotland.
                        This is the details you need at western union location to make the transfer to me and i promise to refund the money back as soon as i get back home.


                        NAME:Your name here
                        Location-453 St Andrew Square.
                        Edinburgh Scotland EH2 2YB



                        AMOUNT SENT-EURO 2,000: Please do get back to me with the Western Union Control Number M.T.C.N# or scanned receipt For Payment to be pick up once you have it done.
                        Let me know if you are heading to the Western Union location now?
                        Oh no! They stole your grammar too!
                        The more I learn, the better I understand how little I know.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Email Scam

                          Re: Email Scam

                          We went to Hungary in 2007. At the hotel where we stayed the reception asked for our E Mail which I regretably gave them. Months later I received a couple of E Mails asking for money. One was for someone who had their wallet and credit cards stolen and the other E Mail was to inform me that this person had an inheritance and needed money to get his inheritance. I deleted both E Mails but every now and then I receive an E Mail asking me to get in touch with someone. All this because I made the hugh mistake of giving my E Mail to an unknown hotel who sold my information to theives.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Email Scam

                            Re: Email Scam

                            May have some idea on what happened to propgate the fake help msg:
                            My sister went to her email and it is totally wiped out, no messages, no address book, nothing. She says:
                            "I talked to friend, Suzanne, who said the same thing happened to her dad. The account sent a message to say – reset password – and then when he did – the spam went out"
                            Possibly the reset password request let the person who sent the fake "reset password" message capture the new one and then log into the account, send the fake help msg and then deleted everything.

                            Good theory anyway,
                            billh

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                            • #15

                              Re: Email Scam

                              Re: Email Scam

                              Most of these scams can be avoided simply by googling key phrases.

                              That is, if it is a scam, it is more than likely that it is not a new one, which means it's been sent to others before, which makes it likely that at least some of them have posted about it online. Quickest way to find that is to select a key line from the email and cut and paste it into a google search.

                              For example, from the email given above I googled "I came down to London, United Kingdom for a short vacation. Unfortunately, we got mugged at the park of the hotel where we stayed" and immediately got many different results of people posting about that same very scam.

                              A couple years back a friend of mine mentioned nonchalantly this great deal he had found online to buy a new truck. It sounded too good to be true, so I suspected it was somehow a scam to rob him of his money. He's a smart guy, and not easily taken for a fool. He replied to me that he had thought it all through and couldn't see how it could be a scam. As he explained the details of the deal to me, neither could I see how it could be a scam, or how my buddy could lose money on it. My spidey sense was still going off though, so I insisted that he forward me the emails he had exchanged with the would-be seller. I then googled key phrases from those emails, and sure enough, many people had posted online about receiving identical emails, and it was in fact a complicated scam, and I even found police reports explaining how it worked, and I have to admit, I never would have seen it coming had it been me -- and I generally consider myself to be pretty tech savvy!
                              I immediately called my buddy of course, and he was pretty happy that I had saved him from losing thousands of dollars!

                              So, lesson of the day, if you suspect a scam, if something just doesn't seem right, if it seems too good to be true, then google it up. Check the key phrases, and see what you find.

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