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  • Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

    We love to feature the work of our forum members in the magazine, and to let our magazine readers know about the woodworking forum and gallery. As the new Editor of the magazie, I would like to provide you with a framework for submitting work to be considered for display in the Canadian Woodworking and Home Improvement Magazine's Woodworkers Gallery (page 4 of every issue).

    To submit your entry for the Woodworkers Gallery, please respond to this post as follows:

    1. Upload (attach) at least one high resolution picture (300 pixels/inch or better with a minimum file size of 100k) of your work. Do not attach more than 4 pictures per project. We'll pick the one that best reflects the overall look. While the picture(s) don't have be studio-quality images, they should be crisp, clear and uncluttered.

    2. Answer the following questions.

    (a) What materials did you use?

    (b) What type of finish did you apply?

    (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?

    (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?

    (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?

    (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?

    (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?

    (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?


    For each issue of the magazine, forum staff and I will review this thread and select a project or project(s) to be featured in that issue.

    Please only respond to this thread if you are submitting an entry.

    Thanks!

    Rob Brown
    ______________________________________________
    Rob Brown
    Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

  • #2

    Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

    Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

    To submit your entry for the Woodworkers Gallery, please respond to this post as follows:
    1. Upload (attach) at least one high resolution picture of your work.
    see attached...


    2. Answer the following questions.

    (a) What materials did you use?
    White pine. Because it's what I had lots of in the wood rack.

    (b) What type of finish did you apply?
    Super blond shellac, mixed with isopropyl alcohol. Brushed on two coats, lightly sanded, then wipe on three more thin coats.

    (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
    That's a tough one. The project spanned more than a year, with lots of interruptions. When the carcass was completed it was put into use immediately. Then I added the base, then the crown, and finally the doors as work progressed. There are probably 40 hours in it, I guess. All the moldings were made with antique planes. The mortises were cut on an old James Smart foot powered mortiser.

    (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
    Not so much designed as just built. It is as tall as the stock was long, as deep as needed for DVD cases, and wide enough to have 9 inch wide panels in the doors.

    (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
    The mess in the living room was my inspiration. The piles of videos and tapes and games were everywhere. You could not put anything down on a horizontal surface without causing an avalanche of media.

    (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
    Installing the doors. After all that work I was afraid I would botch the hinge installation and ruin it.

    (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
    I would make more complex folds in the carvings for one thing. And I would make it out of hardwood. Something like butternut or cherry.

    (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
    I have finally made something that is actually a really nice piece of furniture, and I hope my kids consider it an heirloom and will fight over who gets it.

    Darrell
    Attached Files
    Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

      Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

      Thanks for your submission Darrell. That's a beautiful linenfold cabinet! Well deserving of an inclusion in our next issue....although I'm sure we all agree, it would have been nice to have some competition

      Please submit your work here for the next issue, as we are excited to continue this process. We're going to be including at least one submitted project from this section EVERY issue, so don't be shy, let us know what you've been up to!

      Thanks
      ______________________________________________
      Rob Brown
      Editor - Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

        Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

        To submit your entry for the Woodworkers Gallery, please respond to this post as follows:
        Thanks! Rob Brown

        1. Upload (attach) at least one high resolution picture
        Attached :

        2. Answer the following questions.
        (a) What materials did you use?
        Western Red Cedar, Maple, Oak and Poplar.

        (b) What type of finish did you apply?
        Spray Lacquer, out of a can.

        (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
        Around 40 to 50 hours

        (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
        No. I started with a plan from Toys and Joys for the tractor. Then added the card/peg holding sleeper. The Trailer cribbage board was my own design.

        (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
        Was built to raffle off at my daughters Stag and Doe.

        (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
        I guess drilling all the holes for the playing surface was the trouble area. First had to make a paper template.

        (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
        Not sure. I guess there may be a thing or two.

        (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
        This project was a lot of fun and has drew a lot of comments. When raffled off it fetched a great deal more than it really was worth.
        Attached Files
        sigpic
        Brian; Caledonia On.


        http://lumberjocks.com/toyguy/projects/page/1

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

          Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

          (a) What materials did you use?

          Most of the table is solid Walnut. The bent laminations for the skirt have a center of oak and the slide mechanism is Maple.


          (b) What type of finish did you apply?

          Two coats of tung oil and then 5 coats of wipe on Polly.

          (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?

          I estimate 60 hours including the programming of the CNC carvings and building the lamination forms.


          (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?

          I took a picture from the internet that was in the style my daughter wanted and modified it to include the carvings and pedestals she wanted.

          (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?

          My daughter needed a new kitchen table for her renovated kitchen and her husband loved the Celtic knot design I put on a bowl for them.
          We combined the wish list elements and the Celtic knot design for the table

          (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
          I guess it was the curved Celtic knots. Although the software helps in the design, there is still a lot of work in getting the carvings
          done and finished. The curved skirt was an additional challenge but I was familiar with the bent lamination process. Only the carved outer
          layer was new.


          (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?

          I might change the angle of the feet. They might look better if they were not at 90 degrees.

          (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?

          The table top is a full 1 inch thick and made of four pieces of walnut. The leafs were made up of the left over pieces. The stock was almost 30 inches wide so I had to carefully cut up the pieces and re-glue them back together after put them through the jointer. The resulting grain pattern is very natural and I am very happy with the look. Although most people will never notice the difference from random board construction, it was important to me.











          You stop learning the instant you start talking...
          And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

            Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

            (a) What materials did you use?
            Black Cherry

            (b) What type of finish did you apply?
            A single light coat of Minwax Cherry stain followed by
            a coat of Old Masters Puritan Pine wiping stain.

            5 Coats of Don Kondra's wiping varnish mix;
            25% exterior VARNISH (spar)
            25% PURE Tung Oil
            50% paint thinner


            (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
            Approximately 60 hours (including design work), perhaps 30 hours to build.

            (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
            No. Its a replica of the Taliesin III lamp designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.
            I had to draw up my own plans from various photos of the piece found on the internet.

            (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
            The inspiration came from the shear simplicity and beauty of this timeless design. It adds volumes of warmth to any room.


            (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
            Getting the design correct, the ratio of the various parts had to be correct to get the desired effect.


            (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
            No. Frank Lloyd Wright designed this piece perfectly. At some point I may build another version using two contrasting woods.


            (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
            It was exciting to build this piece from start to finish. There were a few challenges in the build, like making space for the lighting hardware so it was not visible.

            Thanks,
            Wayne - Nobleton ON.










            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

              Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

              (a) What materials did you use?
              Birdseye maple for the frame, curly maple for the drawer front and curly cherry for the top and shelf

              (b) What type of finish did you apply?
              3 coats of chemcraft satin es laqcuer

              (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
              probaly around 40 hours for the pair

              (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
              yes I designed it myself

              (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
              I had some really nice pieces of wood in the shop that i wanted to use. I needed some night tables so I went out in the shop and came up with this

              (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
              getting everything clamped together before the glue dried, lol.

              (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
              no I wouldn't, I love them the way they are

              (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
              They were fun to build and all the true beauty from every piece of wood shows. Hopefully I can pass them on to the next generation some day
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                (a) What materials did you use?
                Bubinga for the frame and Birdseye maple for the top and shelf

                (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                3 coats of chemcraft es satin lacquer

                (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                Around 30-35

                (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                Yes I did

                (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                I wanted to make a simple looking piece that would show off the beauty of both of these woods

                (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                The birdseye maple for the top was fairly warped and only 4/4 thick so it was a little tough getting it flat while still keeping it 3/4" thick

                (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                No, I love this little table

                (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                It was alot of fun to build. When the lacquer went on the top the birdseye maple really stood out and almost looks like a piece of stone in person.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                  Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                  (a) What materials did you use?
                  White ash, solid and veneer

                  (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                  Full finish wiping stain, washcoat, glaze, sealer, topcoat, shader, topcoat (post cat lacquer)

                  (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                  140 hours, college shop time

                  (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                  Piece was designed by myself in autodesk inventor (3D drafting)

                  (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                  Started as plans for a roll top, limited in shoptime created this piece.

                  (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                  Without access to some industrail machines, the large size would have been a hug handicap. Raised panel gables were a handful to assemble

                  (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                  Panel the back instead of slipmatched veneer.

                  (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                  I built this as my final college project with the 2nd highest shop mark of the year. Highest was a hand carved chair.
                  As a side note I have full picture set of the assembly process if interested. seen here http://forum.canadianwoodworking.com...ear#post258768
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                    Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                    Originally posted by Rob Brown

                    1. Upload (attach) at least one high resolution picture (300 pixels/inch or better with a minimum file size of 100k) of your work.
                    Attached.

                    2. Answer the following questions.

                    (a) What materials did you use?
                    cherry, curly maple (for inlays), maple (for drawer sides), BB plywood (for shelves and dividers inside)

                    (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                    It's a mix of Tung oil, Varnish, Varnish thinner, and Japan drier (due to Don Kondra).

                    (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                    Approximately 40 hours.

                    (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                    My own design.

                    (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                    This is to complement a crib I built out of he same material for our first daughter that was born in April.

                    (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                    With the columns at 45 degree at the corners, it was a challenge to have a nice transition at the corners to the columns. Besides, to mount the drawer slides, I had to add some filler pieces between the side panels and drawer slides.


                    (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                    Not really.

                    (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                    The drawer fronts are resawn from a single board (to less then 1/8") and applied to 5/8" BB plywood. The top is from a single 11" wide board.
                    I was in a rush to finish this piece in time. For example, I did all the drawer boxes in one evening and it included building a jig for the box joints (first time doing it).
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                      Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                      (a) What materials did you use?
                      Birch, Curly Birch, Reclaimed Mahogany


                      (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                      The top is finished with 5 coats of mineral oil followed by 2 coats of a beeswax/oil mixture. The base is a mixture of Poly, Tung Oil and BLO.


                      (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                      Approx 80 hours.


                      (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                      Yes, I designed the piece myself.


                      (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                      I have built numerous cutting boards and wanted to do a similar project on a larger scale. A new focal point in any kitchen.


                      (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                      Definitely the glue up and flattening the top.


                      (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                      I think I would probably make the top slightly larger, it is 20"x30"x2 1/4".


                      (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                      Functional Kitchen Art. The table weighs approx 150lbs and is currently looking for a new home.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                        Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                        (a) What materials did you use?
                        Birch, Reclaimed Mahogany, Cherry


                        (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                        The top is finished with 5 coats of mineral oil followed by 2 coats of a beeswax/oil mixture. The base is a mixture of Poly, Tung Oil and BLO.


                        (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                        Approx 85 hours.


                        (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                        Yes, I designed the piece myself.


                        (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                        I saw a picture of a similarly designed cutting board. After spending a bit of time figuring out where to start, I set off to build my own on a larger scale.

                        (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                        Definitely the glue up and flattening the top. This top consisted of 5 separate glueups including a nerve racking final glueup of over 120 individual pieces.


                        (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                        I'm extremely happy with how this project turned out and I don't think I would change anything.

                        (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                        Functional Kitchen Art. The table weighs approx 120lbs and is currently looking for a new home.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                          Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                          a. Butternut
                          b. Paste wax
                          c. A while. My stab in the dark would be 40 hours.
                          d. Yes, designed myself.
                          e. My brother bought me a book on carving Greenmen. My hair was really long then and he (jokingly?) suggested I carve myself.
                          f. Surprisingly, nothing, not even the eyes, were as hard as I though.
                          g. I would not change a thing.
                          h. Did I mention that this is a self-portrait? One of the weirdest things I've ever done is analyze the proportions of my own face (yes, I look normal).
                          Attached Files
                          Chris Wong
                          http://flairwoodworks.com

                          If you don't think your work is good enough, maybe you need a Magic Square.

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                            Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                            3 in 1 crib, change table/dresser and bookshelf.

                            One of my most ambitious projects and one with a time limit.

                            (a) What materials did you use?

                            I used quarter sawn red oak from a local small mill

                            (b) What type of finish did you apply?

                            Sanded to 150 then I applied stain. I combined two minwax stains - Red Chestnut and American Chestnut. Then most of the project was finished with Lee Valley 100% tung oil. The bookshelf was finished in a minwax tung oil. I was running out of time and didn't have time for the Lee Valley stuff to dry.

                            (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?

                            Hard to say how many hours. We spent about 6-7 months on it but didn't work every day and usually no more than a few hours at a time. Except as it got down to the wire and there was still work to be done.

                            (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?

                            I ordered plans from the internet for the crib. Mostly just to see how the construction details went. We made a lot of modifications. The change table and bookshelf were based on some pictures and input from my daughter. No plans

                            (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?

                            The best inspiration of all. A first grandchild.

                            (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?

                            The curved cap on the ends of the crib. We resawed the oak into 1/16 " thickness and I did my first bent lamination. I could have used quite a few more clamps (and maybe a few more hands)

                            (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?

                            I probably would use a wipe on poly for finish. With the low temperature in the shop and the Maritime humidity I took each coat nearly a week to dry.

                            (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?

                            It was one of the most satisfying pieces I have done so far. Probably because of who the recipient was.


                            For each issue of the magazine, forum staff and I will review this thread and select a project or project(s) to be featured in that issue.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                              Re: Magazine - Woodworkers Gallery Submissions

                              I would like to submit this project for consideration.












                              (a) What materials did you use?
                              - This table is made from quarter sawn bubinga (top) and quarter sawn african mahogany (khaya sp.) (base)

                              (b) What type of finish did you apply?
                              - The finishing process was the most exhaustive I have used to date in my woodworking. The top was sanded to 400 grit, then sealed with dewaxed shellac. Then numerous (6+) coats of General Finishes water based professional poly was applied. It was sanded between coats to where the final coat was sanded with 1500 grit, all by hand. I then used an automotive polishing compound and polisher to get the real glass smooth gloss.
                              - The base was first darkened with Black Walnut Minwax Danish Oil. Several coats of dewaxed shellac followed, and then several coats of the same water based poly finished it off. Sanded only up to 400 grit.


                              (c) How many hours did it take you to build this piece?
                              - Approximately 25 hours.

                              (d) Did you design the piece yourself? If not, where did you get the plans?
                              - Yes, this piece is my own design.

                              (e) What inspired you to design / build this piece?
                              - I saw several floating top tables made by members of the Canadian Woodworking forum that inspired me. The beauty of the rough piece of bubinga that I was lucky enough to find for the top inspired much of the process. The African mahogany was the best compliment I could think of for the bubinga. As a result of this table, I have since been trying to collect other beautiful pieces of wood to use as tops for similar tables!

                              (f) What was the most difficult part of the build?
                              - Certainly the finishing process, especially for the top. In fact, I had to start over once from scratch after messing up the final stages.

                              (g) Would you change anything if you were to build it again?
                              - Of coarse! I'm always learning and from this piece is no exception. I would make the legs just a tad thinner, and I would have used a different method for attaching the top supports to the aprons. I also would have made the whole thing about an inch or so shorter.

                              (h) Is there anything else you would like to say about this piece?
                              - I built this piece for my sister and her new husband as a wedding gift last year. I was very impressed at how it turned out, and it was well worth the effort as the greatly appreciated the gift. The dimensions of it are 40 1/2" long, 12 1/2" deep, 33" tall.

                              Ryan

                              GALLERY OF PROJECTS: http://lumberjocks.com/galleries/Boomr99#

                              Comment

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