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Looking for a motor starter for unisaw motor

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    n31 9.69 to 10.4 amps this would have to be changed

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    in the 3rd picture heater element says n31, what is the overload value for that you will need to know

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  • peds97
    replied
    Also as for the the switch Glen black posted .It looks perfect and it is rated for what my motor needs and it should work.Now I am a novice with this stuff.Do any of you more knowledgeable guys see anything in the picture of his switch that would make it incompatible for what my motor would need?thanks

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  • peds97
    replied
    Sorry streetcore I meant to say dual voltage single phase in my post . As for that particular switch from amazon I have bought the same one and it will work but the motor I have is not thermally protected and that switch does not provide thermal protection for the motor.

    Also thanks Phil for your knowledgable post will keep in mind in my search for a starter

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  • streetcore
    replied
    Originally posted by peds97 View Post
    Looking for a motor starter for a dual phase unisaw motor with overload protection. Must be able to be wired for 120 volts.Thanks
    Not sure what you mean by "dual phase". The motor plate says it's single phase. If you just want an economical switch, the one below at Amazon might work for you. "Rated Current: 2 HP / 35 Amps at 120V; 3 HP / 20 Amps at 230V"

    https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00KPEEPAW/...ing=UTF8&psc=1

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    danfoss nice switch

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  • phil
    replied
    you could check with an electrical retailer, the overload and the contactor usually fit together but it isnt' really a proprietary part. usually the overload has a range of adjustment.

    More often than not, the stop and start buttons are part of the same box which is proprietary to the maker. often the stop or start buttons are not electrical switches but rather they are plungers that act upon the motor contactor and they are basically just "plungers" if that's the case then try not to mix manufacturers for those components, the box the buttons and what's inside. the start and stop buttons may also be switches in themselves and that's just a different design. in that case since wires lead to the buttons then they don't need to be of the same brand as the box and the contactor and overload.

    likely you can buy a plastic box that contains the stop / start , overload and contactor from one manufacturer so they work as a unit.

    a schneider one is fair quality, at about 500 bucks for the whole box and it's a great big metal box. on the lower end there are probably a lot of manufacturers , I was getting danfoss ones for about $200.
    some of the cheapo made in china stuff just breaks. the stop buttons are often garbage.

    I like the schneider stop buttons because you can turn them endlessly but you pull them out to reset them. some of the others they twist if they are push pull type and unscrew the knob and pull the wires off , or if they are the twist to reset type they yank on the knob and break it. some have a ring just behind the stop button that you turn to release the stop button , I hate that type. you can go into more industrial quality and explosion proof boxes but that might be too much money.

    I'd call around with your specs and get pricing maybe someone here has used stuff to save you money, but they do wear out from the arcing, especially on a saw where it is turned on and off a lot. each retailer will have their favorite brands and there is a range.
    if it's a 3 phase contactor you might be able to just not use one of the contacts, you need the coil in the contactor to be appropriate so since you are running 110 you want a 110 volt coil.
    I often swap parts like this if they are the same brand it's straightforward but if you are starting from nothing you might consult with an electrician.
    basically when the overload trips it cuts the power to the coil in the contactor to prevent restarting and that coil cant; pul in without power and the only way it can get power is by pressing the start button again.

    - but dont go by me I'm not an electrician and it is possible to wire it so it works but isn't safe.


    you might also want a remote stop button that is easy to reach and that can be added. but think about that when you purchase the start stop station as it may influence the parts you need.

    if you dont have the proprietary box that matches the contactor and overload then you can try to get a piece of rail for them to clamp onto for mounting. the rail should fit the type of contactor you buy.

    the way its wired protects the motor. It should also be wired so that it prevents startup without pushing the start button. very dangerous if it just has a switch and then you might think its off, but then find it isn't' because you kicked the power cord or something. You can add a lockout box to the power in line so that you can lock it out when you do your blade changes .
    you can get a boot to lock on the end of the cord if you want. that can prevent your 12 year old co-worker from getting the idea he's going to use your saw for example.

    if you add a lockout box, all that is is the main power comes in , the box conatins a switch you can put a lock on and from there it feeds your contactor etc.

    that way if the lockout box is turned off and locked than there is no way for power to even get into the area of the contactor. This can always be added.

    some motors have thermal overloads and then what can happen is they can reset themselves and startup unexpectedly and you really dont want that situation with a saw. some of the thermal overloads that are built into he motor have a reset button that you have to press to reset them. I'd still want further protection as I wouldn't bet my hands on a thermal overload in the motor functioning properly.
    the right way is to either have a boot on the cord, or the end of the cord in view or a lock on a lockout box when you change blades. you dont want a situation where there is any possibility of it starting unexpectedly.

    maybe as standard, back in the 50's they may have just just had basically just a light switch but i'd definitely want more than that because an accident while changing blades is not something you should ever chance.

    in the photo you have a decent quality start and stop button that you can probably reuse. you should probably consult with an electrician to make sure your wiring is done correctly. those other parts look pretty old.

    I've tried taking really old contactors like that apart to flip the contacts or clean them to get the saw up and running while I wait for parts. I tried taking overloads apart and found them too complex to do anything like that.

    lots of words but basically you can replace all that is shown with a proprietary box or you may choose to replace only the contactor but if you do, you need to set that up so the start and stop buttons are electrical buttons and not ones that physically push on the contactor. that's probably how it was set up before you took it apart. If you are following that design , with electrical start and stop buttons then you can probably add more stop buttons in series with the button you have if you want more.

    most newer machines like to combine all that stuff into one, because its cheaper.




    Last edited by phil; 12-01-2020, 01:24 PM.

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  • Glen Black
    replied
    Currently de-Frankensteining a Rockwell 12" Disk/6x48 belt sander and replacing the wires as they are so deteriorated that I would not let the owner plug it in to show me that it worked! I could see bare copper through the cracks in the power cord. He thought that I was crazy until I showed him how bad the power cord was by bending it. Needs the wires redone as very poor job was done on the crimping and some other sketchy wiring hookups.

    Was mounted to the side to power up the 1HP motor, simplifying it down to a single on/off switch.

    It is good to 27 amps at 600 volts.

    It is an ugly ducking. Located in Fort Erie.


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    Last edited by Glen Black; 11-30-2020, 09:40 PM.

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    dont have one,

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  • peds97
    replied
    Sure ytsawman as long as it will protect the motor. Do you have any pictures ? Thanks

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    you want a 110 starter with a 22 to 23 amp setting

    19.2 x 15 percent extra=22amps

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  • peds97
    started a topic Looking for a motor starter for unisaw motor

    Looking for a motor starter for unisaw motor

    Looking for a motor starter for a dual phase unisaw motor with overload protection. Must be able to be wired for 120 volts.Thanks
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