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High angle block plane?

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  • High angle block plane?

    Saw a video on FWW where the presenter was discussing the use of a LA block plane with a 45 degree bevel. He claimed it was better for chamfering because it acts more like a scraper and doesn't tear out when grain reversals are encountered. I was intrigued because I have had this happen to me many times.

    Anyone do this?
    What plane/blade/angle are you using?
    Cheers
    Randy
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  • #2

    Re: High angle block plane?

    High planing angle = type 3 shavings, less tearout most of the time but not as nice a surface. That's true for any plane (people wrote a lot about this during the bevel-up plane fad that ended a few years ago), but moreso for bevel-up planes that don't have a chipbreaker to control tearout. I use a no. 9-1/2 standard angle block plane (20 degree bed, 32 degree bevel = 52 degree planing angle) and I've never had a problem. I actually use this plane mostly as a little smoother. I don't use my 60-1/2 block plane (12 degree bed) as a smoother or for more delicate jobs because of the increased risk of tearout.
    Frank
    SPCHT

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    • #3

      Re: High angle block plane?

      Originally posted by Frank D. View Post
      I use a no. 9-1/2 standard angle block plane (20 degree bed, 32 degree bevel = 52 degree planing angle) and I've never had a problem.
      So for the LV Low angle block plane with a 12 deg bed, I would need a bevel of 40 degrees to get the same cutting angle. This is pretty close to the 45 degrees the presenter was talking about.

      http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/...&mid=204385036



      Cheers
      Randy

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      • #4

        Re: High angle block plane?

        The disadvantage that I've found with very high bevel angles is that the edge doesn't last as long, and it tends to make the plane skip more. The surface isn't as nice either (compared to the same planing angle but a higher bed angle (with this setup the bevel angle is lower).
        Frank
        SPCHT

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        • #5

          Re: High angle block plane?

          When I'm chamfering, because I'm removing a very narrow shaving, I have a tendancy to remove a much ticker shaving than usual (because it's easy) and tick shaving means more tear-outs. Reduce the depth of cut and increase the sharpening angle like Frank said or use a standard no.4 with a very close set chipbreaker.

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          • #6

            Re: High angle block plane?

            I use either a low angle block plane (mine is an older Record) or the Veritas small BU plane like this to make chamfers:

            On small projects, I plane chamfers with my Lee Valley squirrel-tail plane (A in the photo):

            I actually have a couple of miniature block planes, one ebony bodied and another rosewood and brass one that I use on miniatures.

            There are not many, if any, block planes with a cap iron and it is unnecessary in my experience. All of the planes I use for chamfering are single iron tools and they work very well (although I find it easier to use a block plane than I do the small BU smoother in general). I cannot see how a cap iron plane does anything that a properly beveled single iron plane cannot do just as well plus the single iron planes are much less finicky to set up and maintain. I also do not think that the high bevel angle is necessary for the block plane to prevent tear-out but a close set mouth is very important in varying grain (gnarly if you must!)

            My 2 cents

            Ken

            Frank English likes this.

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            • #7

              Re: High angle block plane?

              Like FrankD I use a standard angle 9 1/2 for chamfering along the board and my low angle 60 1/2 for end grain chamfering. As Normand said, I often find that I set them for too deep a cut and have to back off once the shavings start coming. When the grain is funky, sharpen, lighter cuts, skew the plane and sometimes speak to it firmly.

              Jim
              KenL likes this.

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