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Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

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  • #16

    Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

    Thanks for the pictures.
    Egon
    from
    The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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    • #17

      Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

      I used to organize and participate in planing competitions. We used maple, but that was just to eliminate the sissies. 5 microns is about 2/10 000". With maple we got down to about 4 or 5/10 000" (hard to tell how precise the measurements are at that thickness), using pretty ordinary stones.
      Frank
      SPCHT

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      • #18

        Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

        Frank:
        how high a grit would you have to sharpen a blade to, did you use special blades, and what type of planes were those blades in.
        I'm impressed, I didn't know they had planing competitions in Canada, just never came across it.

        I cant even sharpen a Veritas' all that well, but I am trying.
        BW

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        • #19

          Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

          Hi Bob,

          I went up to 8000 grit for most of them, toward the end I was at 13000, but it didn't make that much of a difference. I used a Lie-Nielsen plane with an A-2 blade (nothing special, but when sharp it works as well as anything else), and the guy who was my toughest competitor used a Japanese plane.

          These competitions were organized through the French-language woodworking forum, La Mortaise, and held at various wood fairs in Quebec. There weren't a huge number of competitors, though, maybe a dozen at most, but they always drew a big crowd.
          Frank
          SPCHT

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          • #20

            Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

            Originally posted by Frank D. View Post
            I used to organize and participate in planing competitions. We used maple, but that was just to eliminate the sissies. 5 microns is about 2/10 000". With maple we got down to about 4 or 5/10 000" (hard to tell how precise the measurements are at that thickness), using pretty ordinary stones.
            I have to say that I don't have any problem sharpening my blades but 0.0002" is quite impressive. I'm going to have to try that one day just for fun.

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            • #21

              Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

              I have done a lot of handplane work over the years and planed a lot of maple. I played around a lot with tuning and sharpening to get the thinnest shaving and when they get down to the thinnest they become like gossamer, almost fall apart at the slightest touch. I don't know how thin they were or how you would accurately measure them, as i am sure that any pressure would crush them. I have seen them use the handheld thickness gauges in the Japanese competitions, but unsure of the pressure applied or the accuracy of the gauges, tenths have got to be fairly hard to measure under such circumstances. I would be interested in finding out more about the competition rules. My stones only went up to 8000 grit. although i had some compound and abrasive films that were finer.
              www.solidwoodmachinery.com

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              • #22

                Re: Think your plane is sharp? I say BS LOL

                Thanks Frank. BW

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