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  • Heating up a plane iron.

    I have a few plane irons that have no marks on the back for the stanley block planes. I was wondering would heating up a plane iron to put the ribs in for the adjuster ruin the blade? As in remove the temper from it? I was thinking to warm it up then strike it with a small cold chisel to make the marks for the adjustment. THoughts? Ney yay indifferent?
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  • #2

    Re: Heating up a plane iron.

    Your best bet is to mill the grooves into the iron ensuring that it is cooled with cutting fluid . Any heating that is enough to make any difference will draw the temper

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    • #3

      Re: Heating up a plane iron.

      Are you into forging at all? That’s basically what you are proposing to do...you’ll have to heat it up enough to soften it, so cherry red, otherwise a cold chisel will just bend or snap the blade. You’d also have to be pretty darn good at forging to put slots in without deforming the blade. By far the easiest way to put slots in a blade is to grind or mill them in as jay said.
      Frank
      SPCHT

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      • #4

        Re: Heating up a plane iron.

        Center punch. Engraver.
        Egon
        from
        The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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        • #5

          Re: Heating up a plane iron.

          I would grind the slots as Jay and Francois suggested.

          Ken

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          • #6

            Re: Heating up a plane iron.

            Ok thanks guys. Answers the question nicely. Thanks to all.
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            • #7

              Re: Heating up a plane iron.

              I have to ask why you would even consider it? Buy a used hunk of junk and steel the plane iron or buy a new one. If you have to add slots wouldn't you think the iron is used up?
              "Do it Right!"

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              • #8

                Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                Greg If you are referring to the 140 plane I would suggest that a dremel with a carbide disc might do the job as the slots are very fine on the 140 unlike some other models of block plane . I think it may be nasty job to mill them in unless you have very good metalworking skills.I suppose one could make one slot and then hollow out for the rest of the teeth to keep the blade level.However it would then rely on one tooth engaging with the blade.. They often appear at the T of T usually with poor nickel and the wrong fence screws but it would make for doner parts try sarir he may have one, possibly lightly patinated after his awful experience

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                • #9

                  Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                  Question for the group. Plane irons are blades. They are tempered for hardness to keep an edge But how much of the Plane iron/blade is tempered from the sharp edge up towards the top of the iron. My experience tells me less and less is good hardened steel the farther away from the bevel you go. Some are better than others but some if hit on the top with a hammer will peen over. So the more you sharpen and use your blade the less quality you have in the tool's steel. At some point it becomes too soft to hold an edge. When it gets there replace it. NO?
                  "Do it Right!"

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                  • #10

                    Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                    Originally posted by jay View Post
                    Greg If you are referring to the 140 plane I would suggest that a dremel with a carbide disc might do the job as the slots are very fine on the 140 unlike some other models of block plane . I think it may be nasty job to mill them in unless you have very good metalworking skills.I suppose one could make one slot and then hollow out for the rest of the teeth to keep the blade level.However it would then rely on one tooth engaging with the blade.. They often appear at the T of T usually with poor nickel and the wrong fence screws but it would make for doner parts try sarir he may have one, possibly lightly patinated after his awful experience
                    No its a 240 skewed blade rabet plane
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                    • #11

                      Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                      Originally posted by Rusty View Post
                      I have to ask why you would even consider it? Buy a used hunk of junk and steel the plane iron or buy a new one. If you have to add slots wouldn't you think the iron is used up?
                      I was trying to by a new one but the new blades are too thick for this block plane. The blade in this one is shot and if I bought a new one I would have to cut half the blade off to make the proper angle on it. It would be a real waste of a new blade. At $50 its an expensive way to go I think. I contacted the fella in hamilton that helps run the T of T show he is looking for me but no joy yet. I am hoping he can find a broken one to sell me the fence and the blade out of.

                      Its just the nicks I am wondering about in the back of the blade Rusty that the adjusted sits in to raise and lower the blade. I have a couple other block planes I could take the blades out of. They dont have the ribs ground in the back. Hence my questions.
                      Last edited by Greg from K/W; 02-13-2018, 08:57 PM.
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                      • #12

                        Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                        Originally posted by jay View Post
                        Greg If you are referring to the 140 plane I would suggest that a dremel with a carbide disc might do the job as the slots are very fine on the 140 unlike some other models of block plane . I think it may be nasty job to mill them in unless you have very good metalworking skills.I suppose one could make one slot and then hollow out for the rest of the teeth to keep the blade level.However it would then rely on one tooth engaging with the blade.. They often appear at the T of T usually with poor nickel and the wrong fence screws but it would make for doner parts try sarir he may have one, possibly lightly patinated after his awful experience
                        Sorry yes the blade would come out of a 140 or I have other block planes that are undesirable for sales so those blades could work.
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                        • #13

                          Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                          This is the blade I want to reproduce You can see the hash marks for the adjuster mechanism. The donor blade I have doesn't have any of those. I might have to grind the edge off a little to get it to fit but hey that's what bench grinders are for right? J/K guys To buy a new blade I would be wasting half the new blade to make this one. A real waste of material.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	240 blade.jpg Views:	1 Size:	4.78 MB ID:	1166502
                          Last edited by Greg from K/W; 02-13-2018, 09:30 PM.
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                          • #14

                            Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                            Here is the body with the cap and adjuster removed. Just wondering if you can tell if it has the right screws.

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	20180213_211930.jpg Views:	1 Size:	4.68 MB ID:	1166505Click image for larger version  Name:	20180213_212008.jpg Views:	1 Size:	4.85 MB ID:	1166504

                            Actually the screw in the back is really sloppy. It may be the wrong one. I will have to see if I can find one that matches the front. The one in the front seams to fit better but the back one is bigger and shorter. That stinks. I will have to match the back screw for a longer one the same size I guess. Otherwise the front one wont fit it.
                            Last edited by Greg from K/W; 02-13-2018, 09:29 PM.
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                            • #15

                              Re: Heating up a plane iron.

                              The screws are probably not correct .They should be cheese head with knurling (early type ) or without knurling (later type) see my attachment ( not a particularly good quality example though!) Still looking for a mint one Possibly a Stanley thread, though I Click image for larger version  Name:	stanley planes465.jpg Views:	1 Size:	3.24 MB ID:	1166525don't know for sure.. You might find a 110,120,131 knob is the same but you are probably better off to make one for your example Lastly check the sole as it is a weak casting and gets distorted because of the open side rabbiting feature.It may well not be flat
                              Last edited by jay; 02-14-2018, 12:15 AM.

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