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  • Grailwoodworks
    replied
    Another one using the tape method (also green) and an olfa knife with the blade stuck way out to cut the tape. Works beautifully.

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  • KenL
    replied
    I use green painter's tape on woods where the scratch lines are hard to see and, if I recall correctly, I might have gotten the notion from some chap in Perth! (DC)

    Ken

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  • derekcohen
    replied
    I developed a method using blue tape for visibility several years ago. It works superbly.

    Half-blind dovetails: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furnitu...hBlueTape.html

    Through dovetails: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furnitu...ovetails3.html



    Regards from Perth, Australia

    ​​​​​​​Derek

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  • smallerstick
    replied
    I use ROb Cosman's method of offsetting the tailboard slightly and making a cut to register the saw blade. I use a saw blade in my OLFA knife ($10 at LV) for this job. Works extremely well for me. Here's an example of a trial fit right off the saw. Final trimming was minimal.

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  • Wally in Calgary
    replied
    I also use the top one in your pics and it is the Veritas also.

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  • KenL
    replied
    I started out using X-Acto knives since I have quite a collection after 55 years of model aeroplane building and, of course, a variety of pencils and pens to accomplish this seeming simple task. Now I use the following knives:

    except that mine is the older Veritas branded one;

    which I bought when they were first introduced because they have a thinner blade than the one in the first picture; and/or

    the #8 (letter E) or the #2 (letter A) chip carving knives. These knives all do a very good job of transferring pin/tail marks because they have flat sides to index against the already cut piece. The #8 is particularly adept at fitting into really small dovetails and other fine joinery. I do not recommend X-Acto blades or Warren carving blades as they are double bevel ground (like most knives) and therefore introduce an offset into the marking process. I for one need no extra help in mis-aligning small joints!

    If I did not already own so many marking knives for the purpose, I would strongly consider the Czeck Edge Kerf Kadet knife with the carbide blade; it is very well made. (I made a rosewood and brass version of my own from a carbide scraper blade; it does not require honing very often and it handles like a pencil)

    (Tool junkies usually have more than one way to do things!

    Ken

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  • carbonBased
    replied
    Originally posted by Kayak Jim View Post
    I use a thin bladed knife similar to the first one Bob mentioned, then use pencil to enhance the scribe line.
    This is what I do as well.
    I didn't find that knife on my initial search; will have to take a look.

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

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  • bender
    replied
    One of those x-acto knives is ideal. They're only a couple of dollars at a craft shop.

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  • Kayak Jim
    replied
    I use a thin bladed knife similar to the first one Bob mentioned, then use pencil to enhance the scribe line.

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  • Bob in Weyburn
    replied
    A mechanical pencil can work very well as long as there is room.. On thicker wood or tight openings, a longer blade on a marking knife is better. Lee Valley sells a long blade marking knife
    05D20.05
    . I have had challenges with the regular Lee Valley wooden handle marking knife
    50D01.01
    on 3./4 material and tight openings. Or you can make one from a paring knife, Paul Sellers has a good video on making one on youtube. Careful, he can be addictive.... BW

    Leave a comment:


  • carbonBased
    started a topic Transfering tails to pins...

    Transfering tails to pins...

    What do you folks use to transfer the tails onto the pin board? (Or vise versa if you're a pins first person)?

    I've been using a scratch awl, but it's not ideal.

    Thinking that a marking knife would be better, but would like to know if anyone has a preference on a good knife for this purpose? (I generally prefer wood in the cherry/walnut hardness range, but sometimes harder (maple)).

    Thanks!
    -Jeff

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

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