Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help with diamond sharpening choices

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help with diamond sharpening choices

    I've recently gotten into woodworking as a hobby. I haven't had a chance to get to work on anything as I'm using chisels and a plane without a sharpening method. They need to be sharpened on something flat, and I've had issues getting my wet stone to be squared off. I had to take it to a Lee Valley store where they flattened it with a DMT stone. After talking to a knowledgeable employee at that store, I'm going to move to a diamond stone rather than try and fiddle with a wet stone any longer.

    I have a limited budget. The hand plane I bought (made by Groz) has to be returned. It's poor quality, and I need something better to do the work I'm interested in; shaping wood to create wood swords, taking material off to meet the templates I draw on. For an example of what I mean, here's where I got my inspiration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2q5E4LUYaS0&t=219s

    Here's my main issue:
    My budget will allow me to buy the diamond stone, or the plane, but not both. DMT stones are very expensive; I'd buy one but it seems like overkill for making wood swords as a hobby. I don't want to keep buying crappy equipment that ends up being returned either. As for the plane, I'd love to buy a used one. Anything affordable in my area is a restoration project, everything else is so expensive I might as well buy new.

    Ideally I'd like to buy a Veritas No. 4 plane, but that's also too expensive right now. I can't find a Stanley anywhere in Canada or I'd buy those. Your help is appreciated!
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

    I may be going sideways on your plans here, but bear with me, I would go about the building differently imo. You'r going with straight grained material in long thin lengths, a shaving horse and a set of draw knives would be better for your rough shaping. Lots of plans around for a shaving horse.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Shaving Horse.jpg Views:	1 Size:	52.5 KB ID:	1270794
    Three draw knives, a straight, concave and convex, you can buy them cheap, good quality at Lee Valley is still cheaper than a high end plane. This will do your roughing out alot easier than doing it with a plane, and you will easily follow the grain for a stronger blade.

    For finale shaping and finishing a belt sander is the way to go imo. You can buy them small to very large, inexpensive to very expensive. You can't buy this small 30", I designed and built it myself, I am working on a similar 48" model, but if you check out the tool stores I think you can find one in your price range.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	65.JPG Views:	1 Size:	106.6 KB ID:	1270795

    Many years ago I made a couple wood swords for my boys, quickly cut out on the bandsaw and shaped on a belt sander. They were no works of art but the boys had alot of fun with them till they broke them.
    Last edited by Carlosinthesticks; 02-14-2020, 04:40 PM.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

      In the video a spoke shave was being used. I have a twenty dollar one that works well and would be perfect for shaping swords. I also have. A thirty dollar six in. Block plane that would work well. Both required filing and belt sander adjustments before I was satisfied with the performance.

      Planes are quite simple with a few clever design characteristics that make them work well if properly sharpened and adjusted.

      some pictures of block plane, spoke shave and some of my Grandfathers wooden planes. The shavings seen were produced by the tools.

      ​​​​​​​
      Attached Files
      Last edited by Egon; 02-14-2020, 05:18 PM.
      Egon
      from
      The South Shore, Nova Scotia

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

        The least expensive sharpening system is to use “wet and dry” sandpaper or diamond grit lapping paper from Lee Valley. Another alternative is this, https://www.elitetools.ca/en/product...-system/#video. This system addresses your desire to use diamond stones and also keeps your sharpening tool aligned and square.
        Last edited by Kunzwerks; 02-14-2020, 06:06 PM.
        Measure twice, cut once ... and if that doesn't work try again

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

          Originally posted by Showe33 View Post
          I can't find a Stanley anywhere in Canada or I'd buy those.
          This one is sold but contact Larry. He normally has a bunch.

          https://forum.canadianwoodworking.co...4-t-13-1925-28

          And another vote for sharpening with sandpaper (on a flat surface, like plate glass). It can get expensive in the long run but to get started it is not. You can't just have one stone you need at least 2, preferably 3.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

            I been using DMT diamond plates and a veritas sharpening guide for at least 5 yrs. now. 1 plate has 600 grit on one side & 1200 on the other. Both surfaces are what is referred to as 'interrupted surfaces'. (holes in the surface) I also have a 325 grit diamond plate that removes metal very rapidly. These have been easy for me to learn how to sharpen & true up my chisels & plane irons. Just use water for lubricating. Has to be easier than using water stones.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

              The last Stanley #4 I bought was a '50's model that cost me $5 at a local yard sale and was in very good condition.

              I keep my waterstones flat by putting a piece of 220 grit wet/dry paper on a granite tile and rubbing the stone on that under running water. You are right that the DMT stones are pricey, but that's what I will move too when I finally kill my water stones. Sometimes you get what you pay for. Keep in mind that you can sharpen your kitchen knives and other things on the stones too, so they have other uses besides tools. I only have the one double sided water stone. I think it's the King 800/4000 grit one from Lee Valley. That with a hardware store oil stone for roughing out and a home made strop is all I really need. I don't go to the stone a lot but I strop a whole bunch.
              More stuff of mine at:
              http://watertoneworkshop.blogspot.ca/

              My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5...xPoVDV61AxUdUA

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

                Skip the diamond stones for now.
                The sandpaper method works fine.

                Nathan

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

                  Lots of choices. I just took a sharpening course from Willian Ng. His choice is water stones and that is what we used for 2 days. A diamond plate is essential to keep your water stones flat. I have chisels and planer blades sharp like never before. We used the sharpening LV guide in the pic and it results in nice square sharp chisels. I am by no means an expert but after 3 different sharpening systems from
                  LV i have found success.

                  Showe33... if you are interested in Stanley planes I have several in my shop that you can have for free. I live just outside of Woodstock but am in BC until Tuesday. Send me a pm on Wed with your e mail and will let you know what I have.

                  https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...ng-guide-stone
                  Last edited by Brian @ Muir; 02-15-2020, 04:10 PM.
                  If your dreams don't scare you, you are not dreaming big enough

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

                    That was an interesting video; there were a few poor techniques (that reach behind the saw blade with a braceleted wrist for example!) but now I can see what the OP was/is trying to make. It was not dissimilar from the Katana costume sword that I mentioned earlier.

                    The big thing for this work is the selection of an appropriately straight grained piece of wood; white birch, European beech, soft maple would all be suitable. I mention this because the material to a degree should influence the tool selection and the method of work holding which I recall was the OP's original question. A flat spoke shave is a more versatile tool for the purpose than is a block plane and is also a tool that permits much great flexibility for the various parts of the sword. I agree that the Groz block plane is a poor tool out of the box but it can be made to work, as per the fettling thread that I posted here awhile back (mine has earned a place in my tool cabinet alongside my suite of Vertas tools).

                    The sharpening question is very dependant on the tool selection too. I use different blends of media for the task of wood tool iron sharpening/honing since I have found that the "best" sharpening suite is dependant on the blade geometry and steel composition. Diamond stones will cut/abrade anything but they are expensive; waterstones are a little less expensive but require much more maintenance as proper maintenance is critical to success; the abrasive paper methods are much lower initial cost and work well but there are limitations when working higher toughness alloys unless you buy diamond lapping films (Lee Valley carries it for one). Those films are a great compromise for beginning woodworkers, IMO anyway, since they work well and are pretty low cost.

                    My advice is to get a good tool and the film abrasives to start out and expand the repertoire from there. I would strongly suggest a spoke shave for shaping the sword instead of a block plane. The older Stanley and Record shaves are good and the new Veritas and Lee Nielsen shaves are great tools. I would want to have both a spoke shave and a decent block plane to get the most versatility but would start with the spoke shave if cost is a strong motivator.

                    My 2 cents

                    Ken

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

                      Carlosinthesticks,where did you get the plant to built such a beauty. Look like you have some special device to hold the belt, could we know a little bit more about it please. Thank's.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Help with diamond sharpening choices

                        Just saw this, don't want to divert this thread. First big project after building this plant https://forum.canadianwoodworking.co...lowtorch/page2 was the belt sander. Belt tension is spring tension and tracking is controlled by the adjustable arm you see hanging down. Not in the mood today but I will post a more detailed thread at a later date.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X