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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Restored a vintage Disston Canada mitre saw. Scraped, steel wool and oil on the blade; linseed oil and shellac on the handle. I like the way it cuts!

    Online Disston references suggest that it is a post 1930. "The No. 4 changed little, except for the handle becoming boxier and changing from applewood to beech sometime in the 1930's. Handles for miterbox saws started to change over to beech sometime before that, while still retaining a graceful shape until all the backsaw handles became plain and somewhat ugly by the late 1940's."

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Kiwi... Love all hand tools! Vintage drills and spokeshaves will be next. Already have a couple of marking gauges and a square. Have to look up what constitues a bench axe.

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Heard of the drill press technique and I do not have one of those either! Yet.

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  • kiwi
    replied
    Chisels look good. You seem to have the vintage planes/saws/chisels well underway,
    so now you should consider renovating some vintage drills/braces & bits/spokeshaves/drawknife/bench axe/turnscrews/clamps/hammers/squares/marking gauges.....
    (there's classic old iron/steel, and rosewood, and brass trim, tools of all kinds, calling your name with their siren song. I know, I've heard that song hahahaha. Enjoy the journey! Hard to beat using an old tool that you have bought back into useable condition)

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  • bender
    replied
    I've turned chisel handles on my drill press a couple of times.

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Thanks Roy... I feel the same way!

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  • Roy in Thunder Bay
    replied
    Function before form! If they work, they’re good. Nice job, Roy

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Here is the result of my chisel restoration. Stripped of the paint, sanded with a fine emery cloth, sharpened and honed (which seemed to take forever!) I do not have a wood lathe, so can not turn handles. Best I could do was to restore some old handles. Good enough for me...

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    So a few words about my motivation to restore vintage chisels... I uploaded some photos of my first woodworking project in many years from this past summer. Built a "Paul Sellers" woodworking table from his online videos. Great project for beginners! Made my first mortice joints ever and they were horrible! No matter how much I tried I could not get the clean cuts that Pauls Sellers has. And then with some more research I found out the chisel I was using is not considered a worthy chisel at all by seasoned woodworkers. They recommend either buying the super expensive Lie Nielson if you are rich, or restoring old vintage ones which are said to be just as worthy. So here I am restoring old vintage ones.... Did I mention that I love to restore vintage handplanes! The ones you see on the table are all vintage and mostly restored ones. In the fall I moved on to restoring hand saws... and when I restored enough of those I moved to chisels... my current projects. Not sure what I will do next... maybe a couple of egg beater drills?

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Steve in Ayr ... That catalog is perfect! The only place I see a socket chisel with that particular shamrock logo is in Marples 1938 catalogue. So that must be the date of my chisel! TYSM!

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Beach: Thank you for the idea. Hopefully by next spring this Covid thing will be under control. Never new that Marty had a shop.
    Steve: Thank you so much! Exactly the information I was looking for!

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  • Steve in Ayr
    replied
    The 3 shamrocks logo came from William Marples and sons in Sheffield

    Link to the wiki

    https://williammarplesandsons.com/history/
    Last edited by Steve in Ayr; 10-25-2020, 12:32 PM. Reason: Added the link

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  • beachburl
    replied
    If you'll be using these near Kingston, you have to visit Marty's shop.
    It's a true destination.

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  • Marky's Grandpa
    replied
    Now I know that these chisels were made by different foundries. They were painted black and I found another forge stamp when I stripped the paint off of the next largest chisel. Can make only parts of it out. Made by xxxxx & Sons, Sheffield England. Am wondering who exactly that was. Has three three leaf clovers on the stamp. Anyone know what forge that is?

    Thank you for the tips on the handles Kiwi and Jay. Marty... I will have to wait until the summer to try them out. Live in a Toronto condo and play with hand tools in a seasonal cottage tool shed just north of Kingston.

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  • kiwi
    replied
    I don't have any Campbell & Fowler marked chisels, but I do have a couple marked "Josiah Fowler Co Ltd, St John N.B." (Operating dates listed in your first reference given as 1877-1920). I'm not sure if Josiah Fowler is the same man as in Campbell & Fowler, but he was reported to have operated in a number of partnerships. My chisels are sitting in my "Canadian Tools" box waiting for handles, so I can't give an opinion as to steel/edge quality. Handle wood can be any hard wood, with ash, maple, oak.. being favorites. I've sometimes used shovel handle or chair leg for stock

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