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  • #16

    Re: Shooting board frustration

    Click image for larger version

Name:	stanley planes437.jpg
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ID:	1316875 There is your answer Its square, ,heavy, low angle and a tight mouth with a side handle . All you have to do is locate one !!!!! Stanley could do it but lost their way later on !!!!
    KenL and Les Groeller like this.

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    • #17

      Re: Shooting board frustration

      I'm there too Randy but it's coming
      The sharp means a lot, also a big thing is the wax. You gotta have the wax to make it slide
      Locking the shooting board down helps too. Gives you one less thing to concentrate on
      I also put on a pair of work gloves to give me a better grip.
      It made it easier to develop the cut actually working and then I didn't need them
      My biggest trouble now is my planes aren't square
      Dara
      SPCHT

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      • #18

        Re: Shooting board frustration

        8000 then I go to .5 micron paper and or buffing compound or polishing compound, hard maple mineral spirits on the end grain makes life easier

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        • #19

          Re: Shooting board frustration

          Originally posted by Jim in Burlington View Post
          8000 then I go to .5 micron paper and or buffing compound or polishing compound, hard maple mineral spirits on the end grain makes life easier
          That's exactly what I did a few days ago after getting my new 8000 waterstone, followed by stropping with green compound. I still find that the board moves away from the plane as it is pushed through the wood, resulting in a diagonal cut.
          My SCMS is looking better every day.
          Cheers
          Randy

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          • #20

            Re: Shooting board frustration

            If you can't easily shave the hair off the back of your arm the blade isn't sharp enough. As Cosman says 9 out of 10 shooting shooting board problems are due to the blade not being sharp enough.
            Jim in Burlington likes this.

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            • #21

              Re: Shooting board frustration

              I have a lighted magnifying glass on my workbench and a 30x loop. Sometimes when you stop your rounding the edge over. SCMS doesn't leave a finished edge

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              • #22

                Re: Shooting board frustration

                Originally posted by Kayak Jim View Post
                If you can't easily shave the hair off the back of your arm the blade isn't sharp enough. As Cosman says 9 out of 10 shooting shooting board problems are due to the blade not being sharp enough.
                I’m beginning to come to the same conclusion. I strop by leaving the blade in the guide and pulling backwards. But I still think I’m missing something in my technique. I may be pressing too hard or not spending enough time at the finer grit stones or something. I’ve been obsessive about keeping the stones flat so I don’t think that’s a problem. I dunno. More experiments required.
                Cheers
                Randy

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                • #23

                  Re: Shooting board frustration

                  I made a shooting sander to square the ends of pieces after working through quite a few iterations of shooting boards (they work great for any angle work) and getting mixed results. First off, I don't own a proper shooting plane and sometimes really want a Veritas one so that probably has had a negative effect on my attitude towards shooting right angles with a jack plane!

                  That aside; based on my efforts over the years, I will make the following observations: the finer grained hardwoods (maple, cherry, birch) plane very well; soft woods are generally very nice to work as well (poplar, pine, basswood); coarse grained woods (red oak, ash, walnut) are a forget it proposition IMO (you think that you have the job done only to find that the back edge is actually shattered and splintered); uber sharp plane irons are a must but there is still always an issue with the coarse-grained woods.

                  Generally, I sort of parked the idea for 90 degree cuts and use one of my shooting sanders instead. I still use shooting boards for other angles and am building an enlarged version of my adjustable model aeroplane one for picture frames and the like. I use UHMW plastic or the UHMW tape for the sliding surfaces rather than wax but that is to keep any wax contamination from affecting the glue joints.

                  Ken

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                  • #24

                    Re: Shooting board frustration

                    Ok so I decided to take a big breath and start over with the sharpening. I started with my PM-V11 from the LA Jack plane. I very very carefully mounted it in the veritas jig at a 25 degree bevel. I flatted all of my stones. I laid my diamond plate on a flat piece of granite just in case it was flexing in the plastic stand. I was surprised how dished the stones had become after only a few uses.
                    I established a new bevel on some 150 grit sandpaper. Then moved to the 325 grit diamond plate, then the 1200 side. Then the 4000 waterstone followed by the 8000. I didn’t bother with micro bevels as I wanted to see how sharp this thing could get. I wanted to be able to shave the hair off my forearm easily.
                    Well, after almost an hour I was ready to shave. Success! Installed in the plane, I could take a thin endgrain shaving off of a maple board. Haven’t tried the shooting board yet. We’re still not on speaking terms.
                    Oh, and the veritas jig reliably put a slight skew on the blade, despite my attention to putting even pressure on both sides and ensuring the clamping nuts were equally tightened.
                    Cheers
                    Randy

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                    • #25

                      Re: Shooting board frustration

                      Great news! I still think it was the stropping that was messing you up. 8000 grit is plenty sharp enough.

                      If you can cut end grain out of the shooting board you and cut end grain with it. Start with no blade projection and creep up on it 1/8 turn at a time. I think you might have been trying to take too much of a cut each pass when shooting. First passes should just be catching the high spot.

                      And don't sweat a slight blade skew. Use the lateral adjustor to even it out once in the plane.

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                      • #26

                        Re: Shooting board frustration

                        A observation from this whole process. I find using waterstones to be a big mess. I watch YouTube videos of various woodworkers using three diamond plates mounted on a board. Clean, easy, no flattening of stones and gobs of slushy crap to clean up. I may be moving in that direction in the future.
                        Also, I am beginning to see the merit in learning to sharpen by hand. Jigs are finicky and take more time to set up. I will have an extra plane blade shortly, and I think I will designate it a practice blade and see if I can make the freehand method work.
                        Cheers
                        Randy

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                        • #27

                          Re: Shooting board frustration

                          The plane is dull if you're not able to cut through the maple and you are getting dust.
                          Woodturning requires sharp tools and practice, and practice requires evaluation or little progress will be made. Keep your tools sharp, practice, evaluate your progress, and have fun............Dale L. Nish

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                          • #28

                            Re: Shooting board frustration

                            Originally posted by Randy in Calgary View Post
                            A observation from this whole process. I find using waterstones to be a big mess. I watch YouTube videos of various woodworkers using three diamond plates mounted on a board. Clean, easy, no flattening of stones and gobs of slushy crap to clean up. I may be moving in that direction in the future.
                            Also, I am beginning to see the merit in learning to sharpen by hand. Jigs are finicky and take more time to set up. I will have an extra plane blade shortly, and I think I will designate it a practice blade and see if I can make the freehand method work.
                            And you would find another level of sharpening ease if you go to hollow grinding which lends itself to freehand sharpening on fine stones very well.

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                            • #29

                              Re: Shooting board frustration

                              You should not hollow grind bevel-up plane irons according to Leonard Lee's book. I cannot imagine why that would be a good idea for the BU planes nor for that matter on a chisel since you sometimes need to use the chisel bevel down too. Even micro bevels are counter-productive for much hand chisel work. Perhaps I misunderstand but hollow grinding the bevel of a tool removes the reference face that you are trying with might and main to lap does it not?

                              I sharpen most tools by hand and tend to use my Veritas Mk 1 guide only when significant material needs to be removed.

                              Ken

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                              • #30

                                Re: Shooting board frustration

                                So I had some rock maple out this weekend for a mallet head, the only planes that really did anything to end grain were the low angle planes and scraping. A lot to be said for a hand scraper on wood that nasty. Shooting board for rock maple is frustrating!
                                KenL likes this.

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