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  • Wagon vise

    I just finished installing what seems to be a wagon vise; I purchased the shoulder screw that Lee valley sells. Hand planning of thick and big boards is not a problem but I have been struggling for a long time with the clamping and planning of small and thin boards in my bench. I also considered the Veritas inset vise, but finally I decided to go with the shoulder screw. Something nice about the screw is that you can clamp boards up to 7 inches wide; you can even tilt the board what makes sawing more comfortable. Now clamping of thin and small boards is not a problem anymore, the vise runs fast and very smooth. Installation takes some time, surely the inset vise is much easier to install. My work bench is like a laboratory, I can experiment with different clamping options, some day I will build my dream bench. So far I have decided that my future bench will have a twin front vise and a wagon vise. If you have pictures about clamping options in your bench I would like to see them, does someone have the expensive Bench Crafted wagon vise? I would like to know how well it works and how difficult was the installation.
    Alejandro
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  • #2

    Re: Wagon vise

    Re: Wagon vise

    Nice job Alej. I like the dual dogs in the vise jaw.

    I agree, twin screw front vice with a wagon vise on the end seems like a good combination.

    Jim B

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    • #3

      Re: Wagon vise

      Re: Wagon vise

      Looks like a good vise for face work, and it's cheap and easy to build (both are plusses for me!).

      Personally I would want the dogs closer to the edge of the bench. I make a lot of moldings with hand planes and sometimes you need to work narrow stock on the edge of the bench (clearance for fences). I have not tried out the new LV vise that runs on the edge of the bench. Might be a good reason to go to the hand plane event, eh?

      Darrell
      Wood Hoarder, Blade Sharpener, and Occasional Tool User

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Wagon vise

        Re: Wagon vise

        Originally posted by Darrell View Post
        Looks like a good vise for face work, and it's cheap and easy to build (both are plusses for me!).

        Personally I would want the dogs closer to the edge of the bench. I make a lot of moldings with hand planes and sometimes you need to work narrow stock on the edge of the bench (clearance for fences). I have not tried out the new LV vise that runs on the edge of the bench. Might be a good reason to go to the hand plane event, eh?

        Darrell
        Yes, I also need to to clamp near the edge of the bench when using my planes with fences (Veritas rabbet plane and Stanley 45) but I prefer dogs farther from the edge when planing wide boards. I have dog holes near the edge, when I need my fenced planes I use my wonder dogs and hold down clamps. I do not know, but my future bench may have two shoulder screws or a Veritas inset vise and a shoulder screw, one near the edge and the other further away.
        Alejandro

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Wagon vise

          Re: Wagon vise

          Originally posted by Alej View Post
          If you have pictures about clamping options in your bench I would like to see them, does someone have the expensive Bench Crafted wagon vise? I would like to know how well it works and how difficult was the installation.
          Alejandro
          Hey, your wagon vice looks familiar :




          Like you, I find it extremely useful. I wondered about a traditional tail vise but opted for this for it's simplicity. Now I really think it was the right decision.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Wagon vise

            Re: Wagon vise

            Originally posted by Kerry in Fort Sask, AB View Post
            Hey, your wagon vice looks familiar :




            Like you, I find it extremely useful. I wondered about a traditional tail vise but opted for this for it's simplicity. Now I really think it was the right decision.
            Nice, I like the dovetails, something I might add to my future bench. Similar but not the same, you used a tail vise screw mine is a shoulder screw. In my vise the handle moves backward and forward not in yours. You have the screw in front of the jaw, not in mine. Which one I prefer? I do not know, both vises seems to work smilarly. I do not have a tailed planer or jointer and most of my projects start with rough lumber, that means I plane a lot. With a tail vise or a front (metal ) vise with wooden jaws and dog holes sometimes a high proportion of the board gets unsupported , specially with small boards. In this case if the board is also thin (1/2" and down) hand planing is impossible, this does not happen with a wagon vise. The jaw in my vise is a little more than 3 inches wide, I realized after cutting the opening for the vise that I could have gotten a narrower jaw (around 1.5 inches wide), which is even better, most of your board gets supported by your bench top. The other thing to considerer is the position of the handle, if it is too high it projects over the top of the bench and might interfere with hand planing, if you look at my wooden handle it has just one stop because sometimes projects over the top and I can remove it quickly. Kerry, your handle also seems to project over the top, is that a problem for you?
            Alejandro

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            • #7

              Re: Wagon vise

              Re: Wagon vise

              Originally posted by Alej View Post
              Nice, I like the dovetails, something I might add to my future bench. Similar but not the same, you used a tail vise screw mine is a shoulder screw. In my vise the handle moves backward and forward not in yours. You have the screw in front of the jaw, not in mine. Which one I prefer? I do not know, both vises seems to work smilarly. I do not have a tailed planer or jointer and most of my projects start with rough lumber, that means I plane a lot. With a tail vise or a front (metal ) vise with wooden jaws and dog holes sometimes a high proportion of the board gets unsupported , specially with small boards. In this case if the board is also thin (1/2" and down) hand planing is impossible, this does not happen with a wagon vise. The jaw in my vise is a little more than 3 inches wide, I realized after cutting the opening for the vise that I could have gotten a narrower jaw (around 1.5 inches wide), which is even better, most of your board gets supported by your bench top. The other thing to considerer is the position of the handle, if it is too high it projects over the top of the bench and might interfere with hand planing, if you look at my wooden handle it has just one stop because sometimes projects over the top and I can remove it quickly. Kerry, your handle also seems to project over the top, is that a problem for you?
              Alejandro
              Ah, ha. I hadn't noticed the different vise. Here's a picture (kind of poor) of my jointer resting on a 7/8" thick board with the one handle knob sticking up vertical:

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              There is about 1/16" between the screw head and the sole of the plane. I haven't hit it yet, knock on wood (pun intended). It wouldnt be too hard to put a shallower knob on the end and gain 1/4" or so, but as I said, I haven't hit it yet.

              Cheers,
              Kerry

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Wagon vise

                Re: Wagon vise

                Alejandro,

                For your future bench consider putting a Veritas twin screw vise on the end of the bench instead of of wagon or tail vise.

                http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...14&cat=1,41659

                I have this installed on the end of my bench with a several rows of dog holes keyed to the dog holes I put into the wood face of the vise, including a double row of dog holes, about 6 inches apart, fairly close to the from of the bench, to deal with securing wider boards to be face planed.

                The issue of thin boards not being sufficiently supported could be dealt with - in addition to closer spacing of the dog holes in the benchtop - by an opposing pair of siding wedges cut at a very shallow angle resting against the pair of bench dogs on the bench side, to "take up" the excess space between dogholes, so that you reduce the gap between the wood face of the vise and the bench proper to perhaps a half inch.

                Because the chain and acme screws can be located well below the bench surface, the vise handles need not be anywhere close to top edge of the bench to interfere with your planing motion. On my installation the top of the handle is about 3.5" below the bench top surface.

                With the twin screw vise you get a lot more than than the capability to hold a piece between bench dogs. Some other unique uses are securely holding pieces as wide as close to 24" (between the acme screws) for cutting dovetails or as an instant vise for holding the long blades of handsaws for sharpening work.

                just a different thought,

                michael

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Wagon vise

                  Re: Wagon vise

                  Originally posted by michaely View Post
                  Alejandro,

                  For your future bench consider putting a Veritas twin screw vise on the end of the bench instead of of wagon or tail vise.

                  http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...14&cat=1,41659

                  I have this installed on the end of my bench with a several rows of dog holes keyed to the dog holes I put into the wood face of the vise, including a double row of dog holes, about 6 inches apart, fairly close to the from of the bench, to deal with securing wider boards to be face planed.

                  The issue of thin boards not being sufficiently supported could be dealt with - in addition to closer spacing of the dog holes in the benchtop - by an opposing pair of siding wedges cut at a very shallow angle resting against the pair of bench dogs on the bench side, to "take up" the excess space between dogholes, so that you reduce the gap between the wood face of the vise and the bench proper to perhaps a half inch.

                  Because the chain and acme screws can be located well below the bench surface, the vise handles need not be anywhere close to top edge of the bench to interfere with your planing motion. On my installation the top of the handle is about 3.5" below the bench top surface.

                  With the twin screw vise you get a lot more than than the capability to hold a piece between bench dogs. Some other unique uses are securely holding pieces as wide as close to 24" (between the acme screws) for cutting dovetails or as an instant vise for holding the long blades of handsaws for sharpening work.

                  just a different thought,

                  michael
                  Thanks for the tips. I am planning to install a Twin screw vise but at the front of the bench, I have no place to put this monster at the end, look at my pictures above. The handle of the shoulder screw vise is not a problem, in my furure bench the handle wil be one or two inches lower. I really like this vise, is cheap and works very well.
                  Alejandro
                  ALejandro.

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