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  • Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

    When using my Bailey style Jack for periods longer than 15 or so minutes (continuous), the metal sole up by the knob gets hot to the touch, uncomfortably hot. I've been using Topcoat on the soles, and they seem fairly slippery. Short of trying different waxes, what else should I be looking at? Anyone experience this before or have any suggestions? I'm thinking maybe it might be technique related?
    VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife
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  • #2

    Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

    Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

    Probably in part technique, you might be pushing down on it more than you need to. What do your shavings look like? What sort of angle are you planing at, cross-grain hogging off material, or grain-length smoothing? If it is technique related, the blade should be seeing whatever the sole is at several orders of magnitude greater.

    But I have also never heard of anyone using Topcote for that application. I know it reduces friction, however I am not sure that it is intended to bond that firmly and it may well be coming off quickly. I would suggest using simple paraffin 'crayoned' on to the sole. I keep a little block in the tool well of my bench and use it frequently.

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    • #3

      Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

      Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

      Originally posted by Coalsmoke View Post
      When using my Bailey style Jack for periods longer than 15 or so minutes (continuous), the metal sole up by the knob gets hot to the touch, uncomfortably hot. I've been using Topcoat on the soles, and they seem fairly slippery. Short of trying different waxes, what else should I be looking at? Anyone experience this before or have any suggestions? I'm thinking maybe it might be technique related?
      What is it you are doing? If you are doing long jointing cuts with your plane, or maybe flattening a board, you may not be able to prevent it from heating up short of taking a break from it and doing something else occasionally. The wax or topcoat will probably help but I think it will reduce the friction only a minimal amount

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      • #4

        Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

        Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

        Thanks guys, I think I'll pick up some paraffin as you suggest and try that. I'm finding this problem when flattening hardwoods, both working diagonally to the grain and then with the grain and a slight skew. It doesn't appear that the blade is heating up too much, not that I can tell at least, just the area around the knob. I've partially flattened the sole, so I know it's not badly warped, which I initially thought may be a factor.

        I've never had this problem before because I've never used a plane for more than a few minutes before. I recently purchased Veritas irons and chip breakers for my planes along with making the switch to Imanishi water stones and can we say true love!!! I'm now getting those see-through cheese cloth shavings that you see the likes of Rob Cosman producing, except these are coming out of old tuned up Stanleys and not Lie Nielsons, which is pretty cool in my books.
        VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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        • #5

          Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

          Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

          The blade should never be heating up that much, just not that much friction and mass at that point. But if you are getting good shavings, I doubt you are doing too much wrong with technique, maybe try a little less downward pressure. I think the paraffin will make a difference too. A word of warning though: make sure you have a firm grip the first time you try it, you would not be the first to hurl a Stanley across the room that way.

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          • #6

            Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

            Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

            I like the Bester/Imanishi waterstone, too. They are a good buy.

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            • #7

              Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

              Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

              Thanks guys, the paraffin is the answer, it's working much better than the Topcoat did, and has really improved my efficiency due to significantly less effort needed to move the plane through the cut.
              VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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              • #8

                Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                Originally posted by Coalsmoke View Post
                , except these are coming out of old tuned up Stanleys and not Lie Nielsons, which is pretty cool in my books.
                Yeah! Luv it. Cool in my books too.
                Donna,
                Self Imposed Queen of Design Opportunities

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                • #9

                  Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                  Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                  Originally posted by Coalsmoke View Post
                  Thanks guys, the paraffin is the answer, it's working much better than the Topcoat did, and has really improved my efficiency due to significantly less effort needed to move the plane through the cut.
                  Good to hear - the paraffin is much cheaper too. As I noted above, you can just leave a chunk of it in a tool well and refresh it frequently.

                  For preserving the iron, I'd recommend using camelia or jojoba oil instead of Topcote. Jojoba oil is easy to find, most grocery stores with a drugs section stock it.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                    Re: Sole of Jack plane getting too hot.

                    Thanks for the jajoba tip. I use this AD2000 (IIRC) oil which is an excellent rust preventative and lubricant, I used to use it on my sawmill and still have some cans left over. However, I like the idea of the natural oils, since there's less chance of contaminating a finished piece. I've looked for camelia before to no avail, but will look for the jajoba in the future.
                    VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

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