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  • Next one on my list

    Will start doing those this weekend. Click image for larger version

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  • #2

    Re: Next one on my list

    Do you have the drive unit also? I have an old Beaver that looks antique but they probably did not alter the design from when they started!

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    • #3

      Re: Next one on my list

      I remember using one by hand, no power unit, using line oil for lubricant, pull out the knob and rotate to reverse the head off, a good pipe holding vice was required the keep the pipe from rotating.

      Have fun and take care
      Leo Van Der Loo

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      • #4

        Re: Next one on my list

        Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
        Do you have the drive unit also? I have an old Beaver that looks antique but they probably did not alter the design from when they started!
        I think this is the whole thing, it is hand cranked, like Leo is saying you only need a good vise to hold the pipe in place, This one also says beaver. Click image for larger version

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        • #5

          Re: Next one on my list

          I think it is way too heavy for hand use, it is designed to feed it'self while the pipe turns under power.
          Rob

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          • #6

            Re: Next one on my list

            Yes it is very heavy, but why is it ratchet??

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            • #7

              Re: Next one on my list

              Took it all aparts, can someone confirm that this is driven by an other unit , not self ratcheting??
              thank you Click image for larger version

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              • #8

                Re: Next one on my list

                Originally posted by Jacques Leclerc View Post
                Yes it is very heavy, but why is it ratchet??
                So you can turn some then back up and turn more.
                Steve The Drill Sergeant
                Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

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                • #9

                  Re: Next one on my list

                  I was given an opportunity to take a course my employer offered. I was a production worker in a steel plant, if I took the course my hourly wage went up significantly. The idea being I would be able to assist the trades (never happened).
                  We used threaders just like that manually, for a guy my size it took work but was doable.
                  John
                  If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Next one on my list

                    I still have thr Ridgid version 65 R which looks very similar..i will have a look tomorrow to see if I can help . One thing I remember one could make very close nipples with it as it would grab a pipe and coupling . With one end of the nipple threaded into the coupling you could thread the other end . On regular dies there is not the clearance in the body of the die to clear a coupling. Just realised the little knob beside the handle is the rachet reverse lever . Have a look in that area Jacques
                    Last edited by jay; 02-09-2020, 05:36 PM.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Next one on my list

                      The ratchet is located beside the big/long handle on the left side there is a small knob, This knob is your ratchet, if you pull the knob and turn either way left or right, you will be able to hear the click of the ratchet, if you pull and turn a little, you will get on neutral.

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                      • #12

                        Re: Next one on my list

                        That is a hand operated pipe threader. In close quarters the ratcheting factor may be must. When the going gets heavy a pipe over the handle works well.

                        https://www.globalindustrial.ca/p/pl...20v-60-hz-12-4

                        A pretty common type of industrial threader.
                        Last edited by Egon; 02-10-2020, 08:19 AM.
                        Egon
                        from
                        The South Shore, Nova Scotia

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                        • #13

                          Re: Next one on my list

                          Jacques that is a manual threader as I pointed out before, they work well if you have sharp dies and lubricate freely, I’ve used them, and I’m not a big guy at all, yes it is work and good pipes work best, you also don’t have to cut the thread to full depth the first go, when cutting keep backing up to break the curls off every ¼ turn or so, of course all of this is if you ever go and use it

                          Click image for larger version

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                          Have fun and take care
                          Leo Van Der Loo

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                          • #14

                            Re: Next one on my list

                            Thank you very much, nope will probably never used that one, it will go in my little private museum, and I still habe an other one just in case I need one. lol..

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                            • #15

                              Re: Next one on my list

                              Done and works perfectly. 25 lbs. Lol Click image for larger version

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