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  • Unknown hand tool

    Anyone know what this is and what’s it used for? Was found amongst my late uncle’s belongings. Was in the Royal Navy in his prime. The material is brass I believe.
    Mike Click image for larger version  Name:	F7D4E1B8-A593-43E9-B603-202D8BE14C0D.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	470.2 KB ID:	1289198 Click image for larger version  Name:	248F8C76-3147-4F2A-9C49-F0DF4C7B4ECC.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	582.8 KB ID:	1289199 Click image for larger version  Name:	01C7549A-E7EA-47D6-B668-92E0C8538833.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	629.2 KB ID:	1289200 Click image for larger version  Name:	C996D5E5-9CC5-4FDD-BB91-4B0AD24C91F2.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	634.3 KB ID:	1289201 Click image for larger version  Name:	BD4122D7-E93B-471D-AE12-36AC33DBFE72.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	730.1 KB ID:	1289202 Click image for larger version  Name:	ADF78082-5897-43B9-928C-B090B28E639A.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	726.9 KB ID:	1289203
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  • #2

    Re: Unknown hand tool

    Gardening tool (wild guess)?
    Happiness is a new blade!

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    • #3

      Re: Unknown hand tool

      It looks like some kind of a dispensing spoon.   Druggists use something similar for powders but the ones that I have seen have a flat end and a spoon end.   Yours looks like the flat end is meant for tamping

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      • #4

        Re: Unknown hand tool

        When I worked in a sand foundry, we used this device.   It was referred to as a spool slick.   I still have at least one.
        tool fan, schor and 2 others like this.

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        • #5

          Re: Unknown hand tool

          Originally posted by rfielder View Post
          When I worked in a sand foundry, we used this device. It was referred to as a spool slick. I still have at least one.
          Awesome. So what is it used for?
          Mike

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          • #6

            Re: Unknown hand tool

            Originally posted by Soak-N-Fused View Post

            Awesome. So what is it used for?
            Mike
            Slicking Spools!
            [insert something witty here]

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            • #7

              Re: Unknown hand tool

              Originally posted by Soak-N-Fused View Post
              Awesome. So what is it used for?
              Fixing flaws in the sand mould once the pattern was removed.   Also used for managing the edges of the sprule, both top and bottom, to ensure no sand would come lose while the metal was being poured.

              Sand moulds are created in two halves - top and bottom - in a box that opens and closes in two opposite corners.   The pattern goes in the middle of the two box halves.   Sand is packed in, tamped by hand (shovel handles were used a lot) or by a jackhammer-like pneumatic device, or by a machine that both bounced to pack the sand around the pattern,and squeezed to made the sand self supporting.

              The bottom half of the box is filled with sand and tamped down, then a wood or metal plate that just fits into the box is placed onto the sand.   The box is then flipped over, and the same process is done for the top half.   If done on a machine, the machine then squeezes the sand to give it strength.   Then a tube, usually very thin copper, is inserted to create a sprule that connects with the gates that feeds the molten metal into each piece. The top half of the box is lifted and the pattern is removed. After any fixes were made, the two haves of the box are put together, the corners released, and the box removed from the mould.

              The completed mould is set onto a track.   The goal of the moulder is to produce as many moulds per hour as possible while keeping quality high - scrap rates are not appreciated.

              After a number of moulds are ready, each one has a jacket (wood or metal) placed on it to ensure the mould can withstand the pressure of the molten metal.   Metal is poured in, then after a few minutes the jacket is removed and the newly formed piece is removed from the sand.

              It has been almost 40 years since I did this, so I hope this description is clear.   I have worked in aluminum, iron, korloy, lead, and copper, but mostly aluminum and iron.   The work is tiring, best suited for the young and strong.   If the company you worked for offered piece work, good money could be made.   Generally, moulders were considered manual labourers here, but in Europe I believe the job was considered a trade and paid very well.
               

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              • #8

                Re: Unknown hand tool

                Its a plastering tool used by plasterers for detailing mouldings etc Still used and available in UK where plaster is used They are now made of chromed steel Sometimes called a leaf tool
                Last edited by jay; 07-02-2020, 01:31 PM.

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                • #9

                  Re: Unknown hand tool

                  Interesting. Speaking of sand molding, I have a steel rule that was used to make molds for casting. Because metal shrinks when it cools down, the mold cavity has to actually be a bit bigger than the casting you want to end up with. This rule has 4 scales on it: "Standard", "iron" on one side, "brass", and "steel" on the other. The three non standard scales are "stretched out" to give you bigger actual inches that will then cool down to the proper size.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Happiness is a new blade!

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                  • #10

                    Re: Unknown hand tool

                    My description of the sand casting process may not have been the best possible.

                    Wkipedia has a far better explanation:

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_casting

                    Apologies to the moderators - this has nothing to do with woodworking!    

                     
                    Last edited by rfielder; 07-02-2020, 02:39 PM.

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                    • #11

                      Re: Unknown hand tool

                      Originally posted by beakie View Post

                      Slicking Spools!
                      Thanks a lot, Tom.
                      Noel

                      "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
                      'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
                      "

                      John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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                      • #12

                        Re: Unknown hand tool

                        Originally posted by beachburl View Post

                        Thanks a lot, Tom.
                        It's a service I provide Noel, free of charge, and worth every penny!
                        [insert something witty here]

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