Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Surface Sander

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Surface Sander

    im considering building a sander using the kit from stockroom supply

    any comments from those who use one?
    my shop is a beaver lodge
    steve, sarnia, ont




    1940's Craftmaster Lathe

    https://www.facebook.com/artistryinwoodca/
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Surface Sander

    What’s the reason you want it? I had one and sold it. Maybe just my technique but if you do not get even pressure throughout the full length you will not maintain an even thickness from one end to the other on the item you are sanding. That was my experience and frustration.
    John@Hamilton likes this.
    Jamie www.turneddesignsbyjamie.etsy.com

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Surface Sander

      As Jamie says you have to know what you want to use it for.

      I have the flatmaster from stockroom supply and use it all the time.

      BUT....I am a Scroller and I use it to sand the fuzzies off the back and when doing Intarsia it is great to flattening out any pieces you have edge glued.


      If I wasn't a scroller I wonder what else I would use it for.

      Don McFarland
      ​Member - Durham Woodworking Club
      http://www.durhamwoodworkingclub.com/

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Surface Sander

        primarily end grain cutting boards
        I realise there's going to be a steep learning curve, but with end grain, direction of feed doesn't matter
        my shop is a beaver lodge
        steve, sarnia, ont




        1940's Craftmaster Lathe

        https://www.facebook.com/artistryinwoodca/

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Surface Sander

          I have owned a 30 inch Flatmaster since shortly after they were introduced along with several fences and hold downs. Handfeeding a rough 10 to 12 inche board into a 120 grit roller takes some strength and traction as losing control of your feed can lead to some gouging. It surfaces just as the jointer does. It is better if you have a few extra inches on one end to help establish a reference surface to focus pressure onto the out feed table.
          Like the jointer, aka surfacer, this sander is not meant for accurate thicnessing.

          Don
          John@Hamilton likes this.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Surface Sander

            Had one, gave it away.
            John
            If you learn from your mistakes, then I'm getting a fantastic education.

            Comment

            • Thread Continues Below...

            • #7

              Re: Surface Sander

              If you're patient, you can find a 26" dual drum sander on Kijiji for less than $500. I've seen at least two come up for sale this year.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Surface Sander

                Just curious and I don’t mean to hijack Steve’s thread and I am certainly no Mathias Wendell but is there a way someone could take an old cheap lunchbox planer and change the head for a sanding head and make a small sander for things like cutting boards. I apologize if this is a stupid idea.

                Mike

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Surface Sander

                  Originally posted by mike66 View Post
                  Just curious and I don’t mean to hijack Steve’s thread and I am certainly no Mathias Wendell but is there a way someone could take an old cheap lunchbox planer and change the head for a sanding head and make a small sander for things like cutting boards. I apologize if this is a stupid idea.

                  Mike
                  As they say Mike "There are no stupid ideas, just ideas that need more refining". OK maybe they don't say that, but I do. I see a few problems with the idea, drum heads are larger diameter to extend the life of the sand medium, small planers have small head room, you wood be changing paper alot, the enclosed head would make changing sanding medium a pain in the back. you would need to set up good DC, with the drive components all enclosed in the head including the motor, things would clog up pretty quickly.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Surface Sander

                    Originally posted by mike66 View Post
                    Just curious and I don’t mean to hijack Steve’s thread and I am certainly no Mathias Wendell but is there a way someone could take an old cheap lunchbox planer and change the head for a sanding head and make a small sander for things like cutting boards. I apologize if this is a stupid idea.

                    Mike
                    Sanding uses surface friction unlike planing that slices the wood so power belt sanders use a rubber conveyor table rather than feed rolls on top to pull the wood through.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Surface Sander

                      Originally posted by iamtooler View Post

                      Sanding uses surface friction unlike planing that slices the wood so power belt sanders use a rubber conveyor table rather than feed rolls on top to pull the wood through.
                      Just a clarification. Friction is not the action that removes wood in a sanding operation. The action is the same as planing, the knives are just so much smaller, and produce tiny shavings called dust. Different sanding mediums cut better and last longer than others because the material edges dull slower at which point it is time to change the sanding medium. Think of sanding medium as having many thousands of tiny spiral head inserts.
                      Don Burch likes this.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...
                      Working...
                      X