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Shop Vac Dead?

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  • Canuck Bob
    replied
    Search youtube there are a bunch of resurrected shop vac DIY vids. It could be a fusible link on some models. An hour of searching convinced me that an attempted refurb was possible if one of my 2 belly up.

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  • John in Calgary
    replied
    I lent our corded electric weed whacker to my SIL and she returned it, apologetically, dead. I wasn't too worried that she had killed it, it was a cheapo unit, but I was curious what had killed it so I pulled it apart. She had a huge amount of work to do with it and ran it quite long (we only have a small 25' circle of grass so it takes longer to wind the extension cord back up than it does to trim the lawn edges) and the brushes had actually melted their way out of the plastic casing. It was amazing to see how light duty some consumer units are built.

    John

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  • guylavoie
    replied
    A dead shop vac. That sucks. No wait...it doesn't!

    Your description of how it died almost certainly points to the brushes and/or the commutator having worn out.

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  • callee
    replied
    Thanks everyone. I'm not sure if I have the LSA on the shop vac or not, I'd have to look that up. Problem being that my local authorised service centre shut down, and so far as I have been able to find so far, the closest one is over an hour away in a direction I don't typically travel. I've got a portable table saw and an impact driver waiting for service already. I don't think I'll take the time to try to disassemble this one any further. Given what I know my abilities to be, sounds like it would be a waste of my time. I'll just set it aside until I figure out whether I can get LSA service on it or not.
    thanks!

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    Callee,

    We used to change a LOT of motors in the Rigid vac's. If yours has the LMA, just take it back and trade it. If not, take it apart and look for broken or lifted commutator segments, chipped brushes etc. The ones we swapped motors in typically had a loose or raised commutator segment and it would make the brushes bounce. A soon as that happened the motor's days were numbered. We experimented (during slow times) with levelling commutators using dressing stones followed by new brushes etc. They rarely lasted more than a few seconds

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  • Mark in Burlington
    replied
    Originally posted by iamtooler View Post
    Probably should have had new brushes before now but you can see how bad the armature looks.
    It could be a lots of things, but ultimately these shop vacs are not built to last. Running slow before failure means short usually in the commutator burned, worn or crumbling bush, or a bad winding from overheating fine dust causing things to overheat or short. Who knows without a complete forensic examination.

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    Probably should have had new brushes before now but you can see how bad the armature looks.

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  • LaPedrera
    replied
    Originally posted by callee View Post
    I have a ridgid shop vac, it's probably about 7 or 8 years old. It's the one that is hooked up to my sander, so it will frequently run for like 6 hours a day.

    It ran all day today, and then this evening I went back out to finish one quick job, and when I flipped the shop vac on it initially turned on then slowly died away. There was a bitter electrical burning smell. It wouldn't turn back on. I checked the switch with my meter, and there is continuity when you flip it on, so I think the switch is good, leading me to the vague conclusion that the motor is "dead" . Is there anything else I could or should check before giving up?
    Thanks!
    Does it have the lifetime warranty?

    I had my shop-vac do the same, and from what they advised after I described it, they said motor died and sent me a replacement... I tinkered a bit on the dead one and had my electrician look at it and he said yep, motor gone. There were no visual indicators that would have indicated that it was the motor died, so no further suggestions on what to look for.

    He did bypass the switch and showed me it didn't run after doing that.

    He also gave me the caveat of don't work on it - it's electrical and I'm not an electrician - be careful.

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  • callee
    started a topic Shop Vac Dead?

    Shop Vac Dead?

    I have a ridgid shop vac, it's probably about 7 or 8 years old. It's the one that is hooked up to my sander, so it will frequently run for like 6 hours a day.

    It ran all day today, and then this evening I went back out to finish one quick job, and when I flipped the shop vac on it initially turned on then slowly died away. There was a bitter electrical burning smell. It wouldn't turn back on. I checked the switch with my meter, and there is continuity when you flip it on, so I think the switch is good, leading me to the vague conclusion that the motor is "dead" . Is there anything else I could or should check before giving up?
    Thanks!
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