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Vintage delta 14" bandsaw vs clones

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    Al, I have a B.I.L looking for a cheap bandsaw. Let me know if you end up with a spare.

    cheers

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  • Doug G
    replied
    I would grab the Vintage Delta, fix up the King (and Delta if it needs it) use them both for a while then sell the one you like least. There's a chance you could come out ahead financially unlikely you would lose much provided you aren't in a hurry to sell. This assume you have the space and time to make the repairs and don't put too much money into the one you sell.

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  • al.m..
    replied
    Originally posted by Doug G View Post
    Sounds like a good deal. Do you have all the parts for the busted lower guide? It may be repairable using JB Weld depending on how it broke, you can also check R&D Bandsaws or online parts web sites for a replacement or upgrade to an aftermarket brand like Carter (but that will cost you more than you paid for the saw). Belt guard should be easy to fabricate from 1/4" plywood.
    dont have the missing parts,I do agree about facing a belt guard,easy enough.
    as a footnote,just got a return message on a vintage delta I inquired about,he accepted my offer!
    ug!
    still wonder if the delta is much better? Does it have as much white metal as the king?
    im sure I could recoup my costs on the king easy enough


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  • Doug G
    replied
    Sounds like a good deal. Do you have all the parts for the busted lower guide? It may be repairable using JB Weld depending on how it broke, you can also check R&D Bandsaws or online parts web sites for a replacement or upgrade to an aftermarket brand like Carter (but that will cost you more than you paid for the saw). Belt guard should be easy to fabricate from 1/4" plywood.

    Leave a comment:


  • schor
    replied
    I picked up an older busybee 14" for $75. Worked great.

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  • John Bartley
    replied
    Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
    I brought the king home ,the good,very good causmeticly, missing the belt guard,usual rust in the table,sharpn1/4" blade,runs smoother than I expected.price was right at $125
    the bad,lower guide busted,usual rust on table.
    A working saw for that price is a good deal. It leaves lots of dollars on the table to fix it up.

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  • al.m..
    replied
    I brought the king home ,the good,very good causmeticly, missing the belt guard,usual rust in the table,sharpn1/4" blade,runs smoother than I expected.price was right at $125
    the bad,lower guide busted,usual rust on table.

    Leave a comment:


  • al.m..
    replied
    Going with the lowest price,picking up a twenty five year old King tomorrow,unless it's a total basket case.
    Last edited by al.m..; 11-22-2019, 07:22 PM.

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  • iamtooler
    replied
    I drilled a hole in the guidebar of an 18'' chainsaw and pivoted it like a chopsaw at waist height, worked great

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

    Al, here is what you need. You could even rig it for an electric chainsaw.:

    Haha, I'd love to see the machinery approval process for that machine..............Rod.

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  • Don Burch
    replied
    Originally posted by al.m.. View Post
    Not sure I am being understood
    i do not plan on cutting firewood with a bandsaw,I have a very good husqavarnia chainsaw for that.when it comes to small branches,and I'm talking 2" and less,a chainsaw gets dangerous
    i can't burn the branches in a large heap,need to knock them down to manageable pieces,that's where the bandsaw comes in,tried it with my Laguna,worked well,but too expensive of a saw to keep in the shed.
    besides that,we all know a bandsaw can be handy to have around,I just want one I don't feel guilt about keeping in the shed,not the shop.
    point of this post,I have seen both the clones,and much older deltas under $200,wondering if one is inherently better than the other.
    seems it boils down th the condition of the individual saw
    At the low end of the used market, you may find better wheel and shaft bearings in the Deltas, but who can say. The wheel and shaft bearings in my early 2000 King so far are sound. Both upper and lower guide/thrust bearings and the tires were replaced at about the 10 year mark. Check these and the belts. Make sure it runs and cuts.
    You will know when you inspect it.

    Don

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  • smallerstick
    replied
    You are right on condition being the determining factor IMO. I have owned 2 clones and they could not have been more different. The one I have now (with a riser) is as smooth operating a saw as I have ever used. Setup is easy and it tracks straight as an arrow.
    The other one was a constant source of misery!

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  • al.m..
    replied
    Not sure I am being understood
    i do not plan on cutting firewood with a bandsaw,I have a very good husqavarnia chainsaw for that.when it comes to small branches,and I'm talking 2" and less,a chainsaw gets dangerous
    i can't burn the branches in a large heap,need to knock them down to manageable pieces,that's where the bandsaw comes in,tried it with my Laguna,worked well,but too expensive of a saw to keep in the shed.
    besides that,we all know a bandsaw can be handy to have around,I just want one I don't feel guilt about keeping in the shed,not the shop.
    point of this post,I have seen both the clones,and much older deltas under $200,wondering if one is inherently better than the other.
    seems it boils down th the condition of the individual saw
    Last edited by al.m..; 11-17-2019, 03:49 PM.

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  • Doug G
    replied
    I have a vintage Rockwell 28-200 14" bandsaw made in Guelph and had a 14" Taiwan made bandsaw made in 1990. They are very similar especially the main frame but the quality of some of the accessory parts like pulleys, guide assemblies and blade tensioning mechanism are better on the Rockwell. The Rockwell guides are better engineered and better quality but that said, the Taiwanese guides worked. The pulleys were also lower quality and I replaced them with steel pulleys and a linkbelt (also put a linkbelt on the Rockwell). I also had issues with the blade tension mechanism and had to replace some parts. The Rockwell vibrates a little less or at least seems to vibrate a little less but that's maybe because I expect it to vibrate less. I did some resawing with the Taiwanese saw, it was slow and I had an issue with the motor capacitors but it got the job done. I haven't yet resawed with the Rockwell. The Rockwell has more mileage on it and had some signs of neglect by the original owner, the upper wheel bore was worn and I replaced the wheel with a new one from R&D Bandsaws.

    Overall the vintage Rockwell is a better built saw but I haven't pushed it as hard as I pushed the Taiwanese saw. That said if your main use is cutting up firewood an electric chainsaw would be my choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • al.m..
    replied
    Originally posted by John Bartley View Post

    Al, here is what you need. You could even rig it for an electric chainsaw.:

    i would prefer to hold my chainsaw in my hands for that stuff.its the small branches I need to deal with,some for kindling,and mixing in with the bigger blocks, the rest int small enough lengths to fit into my fire pit



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