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Wiring table saw switch

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  • drzaius
    replied
    Originally posted by Rod Sheridan View Post

    Craig, that's for motor circuits, unless it's permanently wired it isn't a motor circuit......Rod.
    You're technically correct, but WCraig is right for practical purposes. If the general purpose circuit doesn't meet the requirements for a motor circuit then there will be breaker tripping issues when the tool is used to capacity. The circuit should be #10 wire with a 30A breaker. Of course for longer distances the wire will have to be upsized to compensate for voltage drop. If the wire length from circuit breaker to receptacle is more than 23m, #8 will be needed.
    Last edited by drzaius; 11-27-2020, 09:21 AM.

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  • Rod Sheridan
    replied
    Originally posted by WCraig View Post
    Do you have a special 120 volt line for the saw? Standard outlets in a house provide 15 amps and this motor is rated for 19.2 amps. It will draw well in excess of that when starting up. I believe the electrical code in most of Canada requires the circuit to be rated for 25% higher amperage than the largest motor load. Thus you ought to have a 25 amp circuit to service this motor with appropriately heavy wiring ($$$) in the wall. Better that than burn the house down.

    Craig
    Craig, that's for motor circuits, unless it's permanently wired it isn't a motor circuit......Rod.

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    run it on 220v

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  • stevem
    replied
    Originally posted by WCraig View Post
    Do you have a special 120 volt line for the saw? Standard outlets in a house provide 15 amps and this motor is rated for 19.2 amps. It will draw well in excess of that when starting up. I believe the electrical code in most of Canada requires the circuit to be rated for 25% higher amperage than the largest motor load. Thus you ought to have a 25 amp circuit to service this motor with appropriately heavy wiring ($$$) in the wall. Better that than burn the house down.

    Craig
    i agree, i would suggest running this motor on 240, most of my motors of 1 hp or more are wired to 240 volts

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    your switch has no overload protection
    your motor has no overload protection
    your going to run it at 110 volt high amp draw

    you could eventually burn out motor with out overload protection

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  • Joed
    replied
    At the motor
    Wire red, brown motor wires and white line cord wire together.
    Wire yellow, black motor wires and the black line cord wire together.

    At the switch
    Put the supply cord white and black wires on the line (L1, L2) terminals.
    Put the cord to the motor wires on the load(T1,T2) terminals.

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  • billh
    replied
    He said, "I want to wire it for 120volts thanks".
    billh

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  • Joed
    replied
    Are you trying to wire for 120volts or 240 volts?

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  • billh
    replied
    If you look carefully at the back of the switch you will see embossed in the plastic "Line" and "Load". The wires from the house wiring would go on the Line side and the wires to the motor would go on the Load side. For 120V operation you only need to wire the hot to either the upper or lower terminals, the neutral wires can be joined or you can switch them with the second terminal if you wish.
    I just wired up that or a very similar switch and the instructions said to use terminals on the wires to the switch. The screw heads on the switch are small and this recommendation makes good sense rather than trying to wrap the heavy wire directly under the small heads. I found that having the terminals on the wires required having a more generous size box rather than one that the switch just closely fit in.
    Having said the above, pay attention to what WCraig posted above although burning the house down is unlikely but a 15 A circuit will probably trip on startup and it would trip if you ran the saw it full load given it is rated at 19A.
    If the motor is the only thing on the line and the circuit is not rated for adequate current with wire size and breaker then I would suggest rewiring the motor for 230V. The 9A load is well within the capability of #14 wire but you would need a double circuit breaker and the plug and receptacle changed to a 240V set.. In this case, since both wires are hot rather than hot or neutral you need to switch both of them with your paddle switch to be legal.
    billh
    Last edited by billh; 11-25-2020, 12:36 PM. Reason: Added comment on using terminals on switch wiring

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  • WCraig
    replied
    Do you have a special 120 volt line for the saw? Standard outlets in a house provide 15 amps and this motor is rated for 19.2 amps. It will draw well in excess of that when starting up. I believe the electrical code in most of Canada requires the circuit to be rated for 25% higher amperage than the largest motor load. Thus you ought to have a 25 amp circuit to service this motor with appropriately heavy wiring ($$$) in the wall. Better that than burn the house down.

    Craig

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  • EFZauner
    replied
    Old stuff did not have neutral or hot.. there may be a white- black cable. so follow that. Remember before grounded 3 prong plugs or even todays indexed 2 prong blugs.

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  • peds97
    started a topic Wiring table saw switch

    Wiring table saw switch

    Hey would anybody have any idea how to wire this dual voltage unisaw motor
    ​​​​​to a paddle switch the motor diagram confuses me which side is hot and which is neutral? I want to wire it for 120volts thanks
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