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Wiring table saw switch

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    Not worth using that switch at all

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  • peds97
    replied
    Here is the cover don't know if it will work.what do you think ytsawman
    Attached Files

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    CHECK THIS ONE OUT, DOES YOUR SWITCH HAVE THE BUTTONS IN COVER WITH WIRES TO THE OTHER STUFF.SWAP OUT WITH THIS



    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Schneider-M...AAAOSw~ERdzXCc

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  • Joed
    replied
    That switch has a 575 volt coil. You can't use in your home.

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    don't think that switch can do 110 volts, looks like it could be used for 220v but you may have to change the overload aND POSSIBLY COIL. SOMETIMES THOSE MIGHT BE MORE THAN A NEW SWITCH

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  • peds97
    replied
    Ytsawman the saw originally came with a 3 phase motor here is the original switch maybe can be refurbished for single phase 120 I don't know
    Attached Files

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    did your saw not have a magnetic starter orginally

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    the bottom of your motor id plate says no protection.
    you need a switch with protection

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  • ytsawman
    replied
    motor may say overload protection or none

    reset button on motor is protection

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  • drzaius
    replied
    Virtually all single phase induction motors have integral OL protection, sometimes there's a reset button on the motor, sometimes it's auto resetting with no button.

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  • billh
    replied
    I'm not sure what the real rule is on overload protection but I've been running a TS 2HP motor for years without any AFAIK. The TS is an intermittent, attended (you are operating it manually) load not a motor up in a remote location that runs automatically.
    So what this means is that if it is on, I'm present. If the motor is in an overloaded condition while cutting then I should be well aware of that situation and shut ti down before lthe smoke belches forth. If the motor develops a serious short circuit the circuit breaker will trip.
    billh

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  • peds97
    replied
    Stevem I meant to say the welder requires 120 20 amp and I can't put both a dedicated 120 20 amp breaker and a 220 20 amp dual pole braker because my panel doesn't have the room. Thus the one 120 20 amp outlets for both saw and welder to be used at different times because the saw is dual voltage.

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  • stevem
    replied
    rewire the motor for 240 and use the welder outlet. kinda rare that both would be used at the same time!

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  • peds97
    replied
    Thanks Ed zauner for the little diagram and explaining about the neutral I will Marette the neutrals together. As for the concern of the outlet I was going to run it off 220volts I bought 10/3 wire but I had a welder that needed a 20 amp outlet and only enough space in my panel for one or the other without having to put a subpanel in.So I bought a male plug, outlet, and breaker rated for 20 amp and decided to wire it for 120 instead, and just installed it using the heavy gauge wire instead of 12/2. The only concern I saw was that 25 percent higher amperage than full draw which I will look more into.

    My other question for you knowledgable guys is how important is overload protection? I have seen many other people online use the same switch with their unisaw. Should I buy another switch or somehow add it.thanks everyone

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  • WCraig
    replied
    Threads like these always make me uncomfortable. Basic electrical wiring isn't that hard but ignorance or mistakes can cause damage to life or property. All too often, an OP's question seems to indicate that he or she _may_ not know the safety basics. It is all too easy to imagine a scenario where advice on the forum leads to a fatal "accident".

    I don't want to be the safety Nazi. OTOH, if there are glaring safety concerns that no one is mentioning, I feel compelled to.

    Maybe the default should be: "if you have to ask, get a professional electrician to do the work".

    Craig

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