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Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

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  • Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

    I posted here recently that with a few simple jigs, you can joint and then plane boards up to 9" wide, with a 6" jointer. Really, you can do any board up to 50% wider than the jointer you have (12" board on an 8" jointer, 18" board on a 12" jointer, ect) As long as you have a planer that can handle the width also.
    It's quite likely I guess, that many of you already know and/or use this method, but I was asked about it recently, so I thought I'd explain it for those that don't know, or may be wondering how to do this.
    Unfortunately at this time, I don't have pictures, but if there is enough interest, I can take the time to take pictures and post them too.

    By the way, this is not my original idea, I didn't come up with it, and I'm not claiming I did. I read it online or in a magazine somewhere once, but can't find the article, otherwise I would just post the link. If you have a link, feel free to post it as it'll likely have pictures, and that'll save me taking pictures later.

    Maybe this can be put in the tutorials section?

    Here goes....


    First, take the guard off your jointer, and move the fence all the way back to the edge of the cutting blades. Set your infeed table down, to take a nice heavy cut, 1/16" should be good. Choose what face of your wide board you want to joint first, keeping warp and grain direction in mind. We'll call that "face 1". Run the board on the jointer for a single pass, "face 1" down. Obviosly, if your doing a 9" wide board, you'll have 3" not getting cut at this time.

    This will either leave you with a nice flat reference surface on 6" of the board, if so, skip the next paragraph. Or, if the board is warped badly, you'll need to take more off to get a flat reference section on "face 1".

    To do that, you'll need to get a piece of 1/8" material (plywood, hardboard, something like that) and cut it the same size, but a bit longer, than your infeed table. Place it on your infeed table so its very close, but not touching, the blades. If you made it langer than your infeed table, it should be sticking off the end (right end) a few inches. Attach a piece of 3/4" stock to the underside of this board, right at the leading edge of the infeed table. What this piece does is prevent your 1/8" "sub base" from sliding into your blades when you pass your board over it. Now, lower your infeed table by another 1/8", to account for this sub base you just made. Now you can run "face 1" of your wide board over the jointer as many times as you need to, to get a flat reference.

    So you should now have a 6" wide flat section on "face 1" of your 9" wide board.

    OK, so now get yourself a chunk of 3/4" plywood, mdf or melamine, doesn't matter as long as it's flat, that is 6" wide, and just longer than the board your working on. We'll call this board the "planer jig". Take some 2 sided carpet tape, and attach this "planer jig" to the flat reference section of the board your working on. Now with "face 1" pointed down, run this whole thing through your planer. Make enough passes until "face 2" is perfectly flat. The board will stay stable going thru your planer, as long as your "planer jig" is 6" wide, and the board your working on is not more that 9" wide.

    You should now have 1 9" wide flat face (face 2 ) and face 1 will still have 3" rough. Just run the board by itself now through your planer to get rid of that 3" piece, and thickness your board as desired.

    By the way, once you have your jigs made, this acually goes very quickly on lumber thats not too crazy twisted to start with.

    Any questions, feel free to ask.

    Ryan

    GALLERY OF PROJECTS: http://lumberjocks.com/galleries/Boomr99#
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  • #2

    Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

    Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

    I have seen this too but it has its limitations and doesn't work always
    (or at least I don't know how to do in the following situation).

    If the board is really cupped or wrapped (more than 1/8") then it may not work on all jointers (for example won't work on my RIDGID jointer).
    The problem is the infeed table has an extension for the pork-chop blade guard that is cast with the infeed table and so after the first pass, the section that is not "cut" will stay high on this extension
    (see picture below I took off the web)

    Click image for larger version

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    With the help of those extra pieces you put on the infeed table, it works as long as you don't need to cut more than 1/8" overall.

    If anybody knows how to get around this problem I'd be happy to know.
    Remember, we are here to share, learn, and enjoy. Relax.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

      Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

      I find this method too difficult and too dangerous.
      Using a sled on a 13" jointer is much safer. I tried the method and it works great.
      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

        Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

        Originally posted by darius View Post
        I find this method too difficult and too dangerous.
        Using a sled on a 13" jointer is much safer. I tried the method and it works great.

        I vote with Darius. I use a sled in my thickness planer to keep it safe. I do not mess with "tricks" on the jointer. They are mean devils that enjoy the flavor of fingers!

        Ken in Ottawa

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

          Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

          Mreza, with the "sub base" on the jointer I described, you can go plenty thick to flatten most lumber. If the 1/8" isn't enough, use a thicker "sub base" as long as you can lower the infeed table enough. I avoid lumber thats that far out of whack like the plaque. Not worth my time. If I do have a piece like that, I'll rip it thinner on the bandsaw first.

          Darius and Ken, while I respect your opinions, I don't agree that this method is overly dangerous. Could you elaborate on why you think so? If it's because of removing the blade gaurd, well, it gets pushed out of the way on a regular cut anyway. And you should always be using push blocks, so I don't see what the difference is.
          I have tried the planer sled, but for me, its a lot more difficult trying to attach and stabalize a warped or twisted board, plus building the jig is more complicated in the first place.

          Regardless if you like my method or not, it's just an option to consider, that I've personally found works very very well.



          Ryan

          GALLERY OF PROJECTS: http://lumberjocks.com/galleries/Boomr99#

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

            Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

            The volume production techniques used at the college do not use a jointer at all.

            Rough stock is cut to length as per a panel construction schedule. The stock is then passed through a rough planer to get all boards, regardless of width, to an even thickness within 1/8 to 3/16 inches. The stock is now fed to an in line rip saw to rip out imperfections but also to reduce the width of any individual board to less than 3 inches, sometimes as narrow as 1 1/2 inches depending on the species and quality. The narrow sticks are then glued into panels from which the individual components of the furniture will be cut. The glued panels are removed from the clamps within 30 minutes minimum. When making up the panels the grain direction of the individual sticks get randomized enough to get a very stable panel. The panels are then run through a planer/sander to get two good sides and to within 20 thousands of finished thickness. The last 20 thousands gets taken off on a dual belt wide belt sander with a finished surface at 150 grit. The individual components then get cut out of the panels to go for further machining where needed or to the edge sanders.

            The process is surprisingly efficient in terms of time and wood volume. I use a modified version of the process in my shop. A component made from a single board is only used for accent drawer fronts or for significantly higher budget pieces.

            Pat

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            • #7

              Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

              Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

              Originally posted by Ryan in Edmonton View Post
              Mreza, with the "sub base" on the jointer I described, you can go plenty thick to flatten most lumber. If the 1/8" isn't enough, use a thicker "sub base" as long as you can lower the infeed table enough. I avoid lumber thats that far out of whack like the plaque. Not worth my time. If I do have a piece like that, I'll rip it thinner on the bandsaw first.

              Darius and Ken, while I respect your opinions, I don't agree that this method is overly dangerous. Could you elaborate on why you think so? If it's because of removing the blade gaurd, well, it gets pushed out of the way on a regular cut anyway. And you should always be using push blocks, so I don't see what the difference is.
              I have tried the planer sled, but for me, its a lot more difficult trying to attach and stabalize a warped or twisted board, plus building the jig is more complicated in the first place.

              Regardless if you like my method or not, it's just an option to consider, that I've personally found works very very well.



              Ryan
              CONCUR with your assessment that, if done with appropriate care and attention to safety concerns, the method can be done. I expressed concern because I am nervous about jointers in general and anything that exposes the cutter-head is not my cup of tea.

              That being said, I am not a fan of using push pads all the time either. I used to cringe watching Scott Phillips slip-sliding wood through the jointer with his push pads; 'course it could be that he was one of the clumsiest woodworkers on television. His techniques were more dangerous because of his lack of control over the wood IMHO.

              The truly careful can often succeed where the average person would be in seious trouble; I try hard not to bait the bull personally.

              Ken

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                Thanks for further clarifying Ken. Appreciate it.
                Certainly mainy woodworking tools and operations CAN be dangerous, and I certainly encourage working within your comfort level. There was a big post about who uses a table saw guard, I guess this can be similar.

                On a side note, relating to Ken's comments, I have found that not all push pads are created equal. I have some that really grip the wood and work great, and some that just slide and are basically useless. So I highly recommend finding the good ones, and keeping the pads clean to maximize grip. And of coarse, use them to keep your hands clear.



                Ryan

                GALLERY OF PROJECTS: http://lumberjocks.com/galleries/Boomr99#

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                  Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                  Originally posted by Ryan in Edmonton View Post
                  By the way, this is not my original idea, I didn't come up with it, and I'm not claiming I did. I read it online or in a magazine somewhere once, but can't find the article, otherwise I would just post the link. If you have a link, feel free to post it as it'll likely have pictures, and that'll save me taking pictures later.

                  Ryan
                  Ryan, perhaps you're refering to this artical by Wilson & Czuleger in Fine Woodworking no.204 (April this year).

                  http://www.finewoodworking.com/Skill....aspx?id=32132

                  I don't see anything danger in this.

                  I'm spoilt with a 16" wide jointer though so I've never really had to use this.
                  http://www.wildervanckfurniture.co.za

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                    Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                    Originally posted by mreza View Post
                    The problem is the infeed table has an extension for the pork-chop blade guard that is cast with the infeed table and so after the first pass, the section that is not "cut" will stay high on this extension
                    (see picture below I took off the web)

                    [ATTACH]22399[/ATTACH]

                    With the help of those extra pieces you put on the infeed table, it works as long as you don't need to cut more than 1/8" overall.

                    If anybody knows how to get around this problem I'd be happy to know.
                    Is this arrangement not pretty much common to all jointers?

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                      Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                      Alexander, thanks, thats the right article. So there are some pictures there folks.

                      Rick, that is how my jointer is arranged and most that I've seen. Thats why you need that "sub base" I referred to place on the jointer infeed table. It takes that "extension" that mreza refers to, out of the equation.

                      Ryan

                      GALLERY OF PROJECTS: http://lumberjocks.com/galleries/Boomr99#

                      Comment

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                      • #12

                        Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                        Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                        Ryan, the reason I was asking specifically relates to the Ridgid jointer rather than the technique. From time to time I almost convince myself that I really should have one.. a nice used DJ20 or equiv would be very fine, but perhaps requires more real estate than I am willing to give. When it comes to something smaller (shorter beds), it's a toss up.. short bed 8" or average 6". In the 'new' category, the Ridgid has a great reputation and can be had for similar $ to a good older machine ie Delta, Rockwell etc, but would require a day trip to Buffalo since it's only available new in U.S. They rarely come up locally "used". If there was a short-coming particular to the Ridgid for jointing >6" wide boards, that would pretty much remove it from my consideration.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                          Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                          I have used this technique many times and don't find it dangerous at all, you should build a shop built guard for your jointer though.
                          Attached Files
                          Mike @ Buck Lake

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                          • #14

                            Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                            Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                            Ryan:

                            I also found it easier to make an auxiliary table for my planer, I just use a straight flat board that is longer than the bed of my planer (usually one that will later be used on the current project) and screw a cleat to the bottom of one edge so it doesn't get pulled into the planer, I found this easier than messing around with two sided tape. As posted before everyone must decide for themselves what they deem to be safe. I find this way simpler and faster than messing around with planer sleds and wedges to hold the board flat.

                            Mike
                            Attached Files
                            Mike @ Buck Lake

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                              Re: Jointing a 9" wide board on a 6" jointer - How to.

                              Originally posted by Ryan in Edmonton View Post
                              I have tried the planer sled, but for me, its a lot more difficult trying to attach and stabalize a warped or twisted board, plus building the jig is more complicated in the first place.
                              I spent a weekend building the planer jig featured a few years in FWW. Complete waste of time. 10 minutes with a handplane to knock down the high spots on the occasional wide board trumps the 20 minutes of messing around with jigs to make a piece of machinery perform a function it is ill equipped to perform...in my opinion anyhow.
                              Dave
                              Powder to the People

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