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  • Router Bit Question

    I am building a new router table, and have been working on the table top. Anyways, I put white formica on the table top and bottom. The sides I edged with 3/4" oak. As part of the project I bought a new blue tornado router bit on line. The bit is a flush trim 2" x 1/2" with bearing on the bottom.I used the bit to round off the corners of the table top before installing the formica. All is going well. I then installed the formica the other night and used the bit to flush trim the formica around the top and bottom after installation. I then used a 45 degree chamfer bit on the table top and bottom to finish the edges. Very happy how things turned out.
    The next night I went to the shop to clean up my mess and put away my tools. I wipped down and cleaned my router bits, and when I got to the flush trim bit I was suprised to see that the carbide tip was rolled back on both flutes, in two different spots. I had used two different heights when triming the formica. I couldn't believe it, I cleaned the bit and even showed my wife the bit. She knows nothing about tools, and after looking at it and touching it for a few minutes she said " looks like you wrecked it". No kidding. Has anyone experienced this before? Did I do something wrong? I then checked my 45 degree chamfer bit and was relieved to find that it was in perfect shape. Any advice. I only cut about 14 feet of formica on each side of the table.

  • #2

    Re: Router Bit Question

    Re: Router Bit Question

    laminate like other manmade materials, is really tough on blades and bits, but thats too much damage for that amount of trimming

    defective bit posibly, i know little about carbide chemistry but that shouldnt happen

    ive built hundreds of laminated kitchen countertops, mostly with bevelled edges. for trimming the laminate, i always use a laminate trimming bit by freud and they seem to last forever with very minor sharpening maybe every 20 tops.

    the bevel cut bit is usually good for one or two tops but again a quick dress up by the sharpening shop and they are as good as new
    my shop is a beaver lodge
    steve, sarnia, ont



    1940's Beaver Jointer

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    • #3

      Re: Router Bit Question

      Re: Router Bit Question

      I agree with Steve, way too much damage. I've trimmed probably miles of HPL over the years using just about every brand of bit you could find and I wouldn't expect to see that kind of damage on a bit used that little. We used to use straight non-bearing flush trim bits in the field that were HSS and treated them like throw-away consumables but even those lasted considerably longer than the one you have. Never tried any of the new Blue Tornado bits but I think BB will come through on a replacement for you since, like Steve suggested, it sounds like a defective bit.

      Regards, Mark.

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      • #4

        Re: Router Bit Question

        Re: Router Bit Question

        Something doesn't compute.....carbide, any carbide, cannot "roll back". Much like glass, ceramic, etc., carbide doesn't bend. It dulls, chips, breaks, shatters.....but you can't bend it.

        Can you please post a picture of the rolled edges?
        Last edited by Ryan Shervill; 05-08-2010, 12:22 PM.
        I dream of a better world, one where chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.

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        • #5

          Re: Router Bit Question

          Re: Router Bit Question

          Carbide is not a material that folds over as others have replied. It will deflect under load albeit less than steel but I've never seen it go from elastic to plastic and change shape. It dulls or chips.

          A photo of what you have in hand would be very interesting.

          From experience I have to say that LV's line of router bits represent good value. My last name is not Valley and I am not affiliated in any way...

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          • #6

            Re: Router Bit Question

            Re: Router Bit Question

            Hi NorthWoodsForman,

            Can you can send me a picture of the router bit & model no.?
            Although carbide cannot "roll back" as others have suggested, if there is some sort of manufacture defect and not accidental misuse, we stand behind our line of bits and will replace your bit at no charge.

            B.Regards,
            Hanif Balolia
            www.busybeetools.com
            Canada's Woodworking & Metalworking Specialists Since 1976

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            • #7

              Re: Router Bit Question

              Re: Router Bit Question

              As others have stated carbide doesn't bend, it must be a defective bit. I have no experience with the Blue Tornado router bits, but even a cheapo bit would last longer than that. Just take it back to Busy Bee, I don't think you will have a problem getting a refund or replacement bit, the Blue Tornado bits have a lifetime warranty.

              Mike
              Mike @ Buck Lake

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              • #8

                Re: Router Bit Question

                Re: Router Bit Question

                An update. After my original post I played around with the bit in the shop some more. I decided I had nothing to loose so I took my diamond flat hone to the back side where the noticable bumps were. I did manage to get them cleaned up real good. As some of you have stated I don't think it is carbide. I am guessing it may have been a hard residue from the formica and contact cement?? At any rate I got it cleaned up and smoothed out. I did notice a few places where there are some missing chips in the carbide, but not real serious, I think the bit is still useable. I then took the bit for a test run again. Much better now.

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