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  • Rebuilding Old Machinery

    the old beaver lathe i just acquired will be getting the full treatment since i already have a lathe

    if there is any interest, i will run this thread with regular updates on the rebuild, concentrating on various methods

    it is a lathe but most of the stuff applies to any old power tool, so i feel the thread belongs in the powertool section

    a lathe is also just about the simplest machine to rebuild there is, so its a good place to start for those interested in old equipment. the beaver is pretty simple and this one in particular is a real mess!!
    my shop is a beaver lodge
    steve, sarnia, ont



    1940's Beaver Jointer

  • #2

    Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

    Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

    it will be great to see a restoration of a lathe. we all like pics so can you post a pic of how bad it looks.

    jack


    jack
    English machines

    http://www.youtube.com/user/tool613

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    • #3

      Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

      Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

      I'll be looking forward to you thread Steve. I had planed on taking my lathe apart this spring and replacing bearings, belt and any other parts that need attention before repainting it, mine is still in working order though, so it doesn't look that bad now.
      Mike @ Buck Lake

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      • #4

        Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

        Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

        no problem, ive done a 3400 before but without any regard to cosmetics, this one i'm aiming towards "looks like new"

        the first step is obvious, a complete dissassembly and cleaning of all of the parts

        the 3400 lathe is pretty simple to take apart, a set screw in the retaining collar and one in the pulley(in the smallest section of the 4 speed pulley), allen keys will do the job easily, just pry or blowout any debris so that the allen key seats properly. removal of the retainer maybe be tough if the threads are buggered but it WILL come off

        the spindle is then removed by a few solid hits from the outboard side, usually the inner bearing will come with it. the pulley itself is usually the toughest to break loose, its aluminum and has a key, but dont be afraid to hit the spindle with the outer retainer still threaded flush to the very end of the spindle to protect the threads. note that its a left hand thread

        the outboard bearing will stay in the housing and is removed with a punch going "outboard"

        the inboard bearing is removed from the spindle with a few taps, it should come off easily

        this lathe is a very old callander foundry beaver 3400 and has an mt2 headstock adaptor that was really tough to remove from the spindle, the rockwells just had a solid spindle threaded for the spur drive and faceplates, other than that the lathes are identical as far as i know thus far

        pictures up to now will follow shortly, batteries are dead!!. note that the belt has been removed, i just cut it off

        pics added, the most complicated mechnical stuff is done!!
        Attached Files
        Last edited by stevem; 12-27-2010, 11:21 AM.
        my shop is a beaver lodge
        steve, sarnia, ont



        1940's Beaver Jointer

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

          Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

          disassembling a Morse Taper

          a morse taper is a method of joining two pieces of machinery parts that can accomadate large turning forces and later be easily taped apart(haha)

          it consists of two precisely machined cones in the parts that fit inside one another, so there's a male and female, lathes generally have them in the headstock and tailstock to add various accessories like cup centers, live centers and drive centers. there are various standard sizes, small power tools will be described as having an MT1 or MT2 in a shaft for example.. the beaver/rockwell lathe usually has an MT1 in the tailstock and the older models had an MT2 in the headstock

          getting the MT2 apart in this old lathe was a real big problem, i tried heat, solvents etc etc, a vise and a hammer, nothing. it had been stuck in there for over 40 years

          so it was brute force!!

          i had an old steel pulley that the shoulder of the spindle would sit on but the adaptor would fit through, a suitable deep socket would work too, then an old cold chisel with a blunt end to slide into the shaft and sit on the end of the adaptor and a 15 lb sledge hammer, all sitting on the concrete floor. one good wack, and its done

          the moral of the story? take the time to do a good setup, followed by a good wack!!
          Attached Files
          my shop is a beaver lodge
          steve, sarnia, ont



          1940's Beaver Jointer

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

            Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

            i should add a couple of points

            first im not a mechanic, machinist or anything like that and my tools are not much different than most of us already have, no huge presses, metal lathes etc etc. woodworking tools are pretty simple things compared to cars for example which many of us have fixed over the years

            my tool kit consists of the following:

            a decent socket set, mines just a crappy tire 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4 drive set, pretty basic

            a decent set of combination wrenches, imperial is the most widely used, metric is rare on older stuff except european and really old british stuff that may use whitworth

            a couple of good adjustable wrenches and pipe wrenches

            a good set of allen keys

            i took this lathe apart witha couple of allen keys, a pipe wrench and an adjustable

            a hammer and a few punches, a metal working vise is somewhat useful, propane torch

            i havent used it yet on this project, but a wheel puller is handy, mines just a PA cheapie

            a small drill press will work well as a small press for bearings and such

            PATIENCE!! sometimes brute force works, patience works even better

            next post deals with buggered up threads(the machine type)
            my shop is a beaver lodge
            steve, sarnia, ont



            1940's Beaver Jointer

            Comment


            • #7

              Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

              Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

              Very interesting post Steve, keep it going as we are on the edge of the seat here to see how the story "turns" out. (he he)
              Robert.
              If you can't grow it, catch it, or build it, what makes you think you need it?

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                well this thing arrived sight unseen, so i wasnt expecting much

                so far, the only real problem has been the stuck morse taper fitting(solved) and the bearings are completely worn out, well and the belt too.

                but bearings are easy, they are F A G 6204 and F A G 6205, available at any bearing supply place for about 12 bucks each and they are a snug tap in fit on both the spindle and housing, so the're easy

                i spent a good 2 hours getting the outboard retainer threaded back onto the spindle, the threads on the spindle were a bit worn probably from having outboard faceplates crossthreaded or a set screw in the faceplate not loosened enough. its a left hand thread, so a die is not easy or cheap to find. so some judicious filing, lots of lube and gentle tightening then loosening and more lube and cleaning, more tightening and loosening, the threads are clean and the retainer spins on easily

                the tailstock was easy, again the morse taper fitting was stuck, its an mt1 with a dead center mounted in it and of course the handwheel hadnt been removed from the spindle for years, so gentle persuasion, lube and some back and forth work and the spindle is out

                now its just cleanup and paint the main castings, buff up the shiny bits, make sure the machined surfaces are smooth and reassembly. then on the motor(havent tried it yet) but motors are pretty easy
                my shop is a beaver lodge
                steve, sarnia, ont



                1940's Beaver Jointer

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                  Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                  Picture.jpgive ordered the bearings, one of them is not in stock across the road, will be here in 48 hrs

                  so on to other stuff

                  cleaned the head stock and tailstock castings, first in hot soapy water then varsol, then a light sanding all over, just 150 grit, they are rough castings. cleaned all machined surfaces with 220 then steel wool, they will be masked off during painting, the main bed casting also

                  the motor that came with the lathe was kind of rough, pulled the pulley, rewired it properly, has some runout, so i'll check the bearings and startswitch

                  the tailstock was in good condition, just cleaned the threads really well, made a new washer for the lock bolt(flat on one side to engage the spindle) and its ready for paint

                  here's a pic of all that i got, except i did get 3 faceplates, 2 inboard and one outboard and a set of ct turning tools

                  and no the husky was already ours, he's my supervisor, shoe destroyer and scrapwood chewer, loves walnut!!
                  Last edited by stevem; 12-28-2010, 02:16 PM.
                  my shop is a beaver lodge
                  steve, sarnia, ont



                  1940's Beaver Jointer

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                    Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                    Most interesting Steve.

                    Note to moderator - once this thing is restored, it may be useful to add it to the tutorial section.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                      Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                      nothing interesting to report, just cleaning and sanding ready for paint

                      i have a colour, the closest apparently is a sico volcanic rock from rona

                      i'll just get an alkyd interior semigloss, some careful brushwork will save a lot of masking

                      we'll see how it looks afterward, really most of it is just rough cast iron not a car body

                      the missing bearing arrived today, 24 hour service, cant beat that
                      my shop is a beaver lodge
                      steve, sarnia, ont



                      1940's Beaver Jointer

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                      • #12

                        Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                        Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                        Originally posted by stevem View Post
                        the old beaver lathe i just acquired will be getting the full treatment since i already have a lathe
                        Great report, so far, Steve! But this sentence of yours puzzles me.

                        Is it getting the full treatment because you want to resell it? Or because you are in no rush since you have a functional lathe? Or because you've done it once before on the other lathe and now want to dial it up a notch?

                        ...art

                        ps: why do the same colour, liven things up a bit! Royal purple with yellow trim! navy blue. Glossy black with red/gold flames! Oneway white to really confuse people! (have fun)
                        It's not about you.

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                        • #13

                          Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                          Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                          I don't think you could have found a easier candidate for a
                          refurbish

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                            Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                            art, its final home is yet to be determined, i wont keep both of course!! this machine was basically free and had a couple of faceplates and a set of turning tools with it so i couldnt turn it down!! one of them will be sold eventually

                            its considerably older than the one im using now, although they are identical in almost every way. this machines dates before the 1954 rockwell buyout of beaver

                            i also wanted something to experiment on with painting rather than tear apart one of my functioning machines

                            and yes wysong, a lathe is the easiest machine to start with for sure, especially a simple 4 speed belt drive
                            my shop is a beaver lodge
                            steve, sarnia, ont



                            1940's Beaver Jointer

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                              Re: Rebuilding Old Machinery

                              Motor and Pulleys

                              the pulley in the headstock cameout when removing the spindle, the motor pulley was totally different. it was stuck solid. so out comes the puller, very useful and far better than pounding!!

                              even if the motor was toast, that 4 speed beaver pulley is not easily replaced. note the small socket under the puller mandrel, the mandrel is bigger than the motor shaft.

                              the motor shaft was badly scarred by a loose set screw, so a little filing and clean up the inside of the pulley with a 1/2 inch drill bit by hand not in a drill. its now a snug slip on fit. the headstock spindle and pulley got the same treatment. both pulleys have keyways in them but no key not even on the headstock, motor has no keyway

                              the motor had been wired with 14-2 household wire, so that came out. the wire installed now is a temporary one to check the motor, i always wire up a motor like this with 14-3 stranded wire, i strip the wire carefully then twist the strands, form a loop and solder the ends. always use a cable restraint were the cable exits the motor

                              ah hah, the motor works but does have some run out causing the start switch to rattle, so tear that down tomorrow, check the bearings and switch.
                              Attached Files
                              my shop is a beaver lodge
                              steve, sarnia, ont



                              1940's Beaver Jointer

                              Comment

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