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Wadkin Mechanical Woodworker 1897.

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by jgarrett forsberg View Post
    thank you for posting
    It's something that every temple should have .

    Cheers, Vann.

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  • jgarrett forsberg
    replied
    thank you for posting

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    Cheers, Vann.

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  • J Vann
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    Click image for larger version

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  • Pfakir
    replied
    I’m pretty sure Cam has 2 small cattledogs from NZ, one has the miller the other the mechanical Woodworker.
    I spoke to him just last week and he’s off to do the Canada Alaska trip as we speak.
    Ill have a look thru old posts of his for those pics.
    H.

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  • wallace1973
    replied
    I have a theory about the original mechanical woodworker. When the company was dissolved in 1906 and wadkin and King left to do their own thing and Goddard and Jarvis took over the running of wadkin & co. Wadkin and king created their own version of the machine and it became the miller as we know. Wadkin died in 1918 I think and then wadkin &co bought his company wadkin mills in 1921. I have yet to see a woodworker in a catalogue, I have a tooling catalogue. I have seen millers in early catalogues from the 20's

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by J Vann View Post
    Enquiries so far suggest that some machinery from the Kilbirnie workshop of the Wellington Tramway was gifted to an African country, several years ago.
    Possibly Malawi.

    Here's part of a column from the Evening Post (a Wellington newspaper) dated 18th March 1929 describing the new tram workshop.

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    The relevant part to this thread is "...Some of the metal and wood working plant has been brought over from the Newtown shops, but a greater proportion is new and right up to the minute. A universal wood worker, for instance, will do the work of half a dozen of the old type machines..." Although I know better than to trust a newspaper report, this suggests to me that their Mechanical Woodworker was new in 1929.

    I don't know if they still made the old curvy one in the 1920s?

    Cheers, Vann.

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  • Pfakir
    replied
    That one sold in Melbourne in 2011.
    WX119 from memory, it still comes up if you google grays auctions pattern mill.
    If it was the smaller I might be tempted but a WX is a monster unless you really need it.
    I doubt he’ll get much for it at all.
    H.

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by Pfakir View Post
    Oops I forgot the two what sold on Grays a while back.
    Big $.
    H.
    And here's a Pattern Miller listed on that well detested auction site... https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/123642940487?ul_noapp=true Located in Orange, NSW, Australia.

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    Cheers, Vann.


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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by J Vann View Post
    ...I think the Wellington tramway buildings may still be standing - in use as a trolley bus garage until about a year ago. However I doubt there is any heavy machinery still existant...
    Enquiries so far suggest that some machinery from the Kilbirnie workshop of the Wellington Tramway was gifted to an African country, several years ago. My contact will see if he can find any more detail.

    Cheers, Vann.

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  • Pfakir
    replied
    Oops I forgot the two what sold on Grays a while back.
    Big $.
    H.
    Attached Files

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by Pfakir View Post
    ...Here’s the listing. It was Guv. but not Railway, I knew you would be onto it...
    Thanks Pfakir. Both the Auckland Transport Board and the Wellington Corporation Tramway built their own trams (although much smaller operations than NZ Government Railways).

    I think the Wellington tramway buildings may still be standing - in use as a trolley bus garage until about a year ago. However I doubt there is any heavy machinery still existant. The Wellington Tramway Museum had a Wadkin DO bandsaw from the tram barn until they sold it about 18 months ago (plonkers).

    I would guess that the mechanical woodworker from the Auckland Transport Board would be the one that Chris bought from Mason Bros Foundry.

    I really am surprised that the Devonport Naval Dockyard didn't have one.

    On a smaller scale: The Wood Mill at the Otahuhu Railway Workshops burnt down in 1955. The replacement building had a Wadkin LQ installed (which I'll swear is the one that sold on Trademe last year). So at least three of the four railway workshops had boring and recessing machines (but no mechanical woodworkers).

    Cheers, Vann.

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  • Pfakir
    replied
    Here is the Oz listing. This list is dated 5/52 apparently.

    This is interesting as it shows the machine I’m searching for which was a Mechanical Woodworker by the original company and the listing for S A Railways is an Pattern milling machine from the second company.
    Alison has posted pics of this machine on the OWWM site in a post on the Railway workshops in South Australia down the road from where she grew up.
    The majority of these are from NSW and going thru these in order

    BHP in Newcastle .......I don’t know anything about this but they shut down their steelworks many years ago.

    CSR Sydney.......My dad worked there as a maintainance fitter on night shift in their production plant in the early 60s. A younger woody I know had space in their old Pyrmont factory before it was torn down. He mentioned a DR36 bandsaw. Housing built all over there now.

    Cockatoo Naval Dockyard Sydney...This facility was owned by Vickers so this may be a double entry for one machine.......Pattern shop auctioned off in 1991 now a tourist venue in the harbour. I served my time at Garden Island the other Naval Dockyard in Sydney. A Patternmaker came over from Cocko in the late 60s but the gear was never discussed and he’d by planted by now.

    NSW Gov Railway Chullora.......They had a big yard and workshop but now even the TAFE is shutting down I know nothing re this machine. A lot of their equipment may have ended up at Cabinetmaking at Lidcombe TAFE nearby. Their was a Sagar lineshaft Disc and bobbin auctioned from there a few years back. I stuffed up the auction time but had nowhere to put it at the time.

    NSW Gov Railway Everliegh......I went to the disposal auction in 199? And bought a 10” RS lathe and a mate bought a16” RD planer. The mill was still in the foundry and was bought by a mob in Queensland from memory, it was huge.

    NSW Gov Tramways Randwick........This is the one the TTTG was given and I am chasing. A woodturner mate Mike Darlow bought a 30” Oliver jointer at this auction in 1991.

    Supply Dept of Melbourne and Sydney. Know nothing but this was probably in Melbourne.Victoria.

    Sydney County Council....... My mate Jack Thompson who was sales manager for Australian Engineering Services. A.E.S.who were the NSW Wadkin agents from the 1920 until Wadkin set up here in 1983 or so told me how many Wadkins he’’d sold to the council. I doubt if their workshop still exists but will chase Jack.

    Sydney Tech College Ultimo Sydney........I went to tech here from 1965 to 1968 and there was a Bridgeport in the metal pattern area but no Wadkin Mill. I know the last teacher from there who would have gone thru his apprentiship 10 years prior to me so I’ll ask him. There may also be some very old members of the local master patternmakers guild still alive who may have info to ad.

    In addition to these listed The was one auctioned a few years back from Cunberland patterns here in Sydney it was a WX bought in the 1960s.
    Alison bought the tooling from this machine.

    Well that’s it for NSW as far as the other States go I understand that the local GM subsidiary Holden had 2. As they only started to design and build cars from scratch in the late 50s their machines aren’t listed.

    The foundry at Maryborough was still operating a few years ago and with the local sugar mills needing firebars etc are probably ok. The boss of Carbatec (an Oz mob like Lee Valley but low rent) had their mini lathe prototyped here before getting it mass produced in China.

    I did visit Jack Thompson a few years back and he said whilst he was a salesman and then sales manager for about 20 years they never sold a Pattern mill.
    H.

    Last edited by Pfakir; 01-21-2019, 08:54 PM.

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  • Pfakir
    replied
    Vann,
    Here’s the listing. It was Guv. but not Railway, I knew you would be onto it.
    Herriwullie posted the 4 pages in reply to Jacks 2015 post. “1910 pics of the Wadkin Pattern Miller.”
    I’ll post the Oz list when I get back from getting my eyes checked for new specs, just had both cataracts done and now need new specs.
    H.

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  • J Vann
    replied
    Originally posted by Pfakir View Post
    ...Theres a listing of the countries and companies Wadkin sold these and the later pattern mills to up to about 1952 and from memory NZ only had 2 and they were both Government (railway)from memory. I’ll dig out the list and repost it here with the Oz and NZ ones accounted for noted...
    While researching the history of my Wadkin RB surface planer I came across a list of all the machinery acquired when NZ Railways re-equipped their four railway workshops in 1925-30. There are no mechanical woodworkers on the list. The nearest machines are two Robinson boring and recessing machines for the pattern shops at Hutt and Hillside workshops.

    I'm also sure that none were transferred from the old workshops, to the new pattern shops, at that time (it's possibe that one or more may have been transferred to other woodworking departments within the railway workshops - but unlikely).

    I wonder if the Devonport naval base had one? The other large manufacturing plant that may (or may not) have had one is A & G Price in Thames (NZ).

    Hopefully your list will clarify this.

    Cheers, Vann.

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