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  • Atlas Workshop Drillpress

    Last week I picked up a little (12”) drill press. I liked the pulley cover 😊. It was in pretty good shape other than the motor smoked when I plugged it in. I took it all apart, polished the post and table, primed and then painted all other surfaces. I replaced the motor with an explosion proof motor that looks a lot like a Leland. The motor is heavy meaning that this little guy will need to be bolted down. It has virtually zero runout. Here’s 1 before (from the sellers ad) and after pictures





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    Last edited by tool fan; 11-17-2021, 05:27 PM.
    Soak-N-Fused, redlee and 2 others like this.
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  • #2

    Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

    Nice restore. First I recall of an atlas 'workshop' model. Any idea of the age? And I am wondering why the label is so far off position.
    Steve The Drill Sergeant
    Check out MyShopNotes on YouTube.

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    • #3

      Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

      Originally posted by schor View Post
      Nice restore. First I recall of an atlas 'workshop' model. Any idea of the age? And I am wondering why the label is so far off position.
      I’m guessing 1960’s. The label came like that. I almost scraped it off. Thanks


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      • #4

        Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

        Vintage machinery has some reprints of Atlas Workshop machines. Apparently there was a whole line of them. It looks like 1959 was the last year of production.

        http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/51/1917.pdf

        http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs...l.aspx?id=1231

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        • #5

          Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

          Cool looking drill press Rory, nice cleanup/restore, I always liked these small presses, though I only recall the drill presses with the more lower round pulley cover, nice job
          tool fan likes this.

          Have fun and take care
          Leo Van Der Loo

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          • #6

            Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

            Its got a nice table , many that age look a lot more like Swiss cheese. by that it looks like it had a "soft life" I think sturdy tabletop drills are getting harder to find and the new offshore junk just doesn't compare so far as quality is concerned. Its a nice little drill. the motor looks sturdy too, maybe it's from a gas pump or similar.
            Last edited by stickman; 11-18-2021, 03:40 PM.
            tool fan likes this.

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            • #7

              Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

              Another great restoration Rory, keep 'em coming! You seem to be the only restorer on this coast who finds hidden gems to make new again.
              tool fan likes this.

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              • #8

                Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                Originally posted by stickman View Post
                Its got a nice table , many that age look a lot more like Swiss cheese. by that it looks like it had a "soft life" I think sturdy tabletop drills are getting harder to find and the new offshore junk just doesn't compare so far as quality is concerned. Its a nice little drill. the motor looks sturdy too, maybe it's from a gas pump or similar.
                I believe that I picked up the motor with a lathe. I've had if for a while. The switch is built into the motor. It was activated by a bar that someone else had rigged up. There was a big ball of electrical tape on the handle. When. I peeled it off I discovered that the bar was actually a spike. I cut the head off, cut a thread into the end and screwed a ball knob onto it. I just sold the drill press last night. The owner also has a 6-18 Atlas metal lathe so now it has a friend.

                I completely agree about the old iron. They were built to be sturdy and last. I'm a sucker for this kind of stuff.

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                • #9

                  Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                  Originally posted by Frank English View Post
                  Another great restoration Rory, keep 'em coming! You seem to be the only restorer on this coast who finds hidden gems to make new again.
                  Thank you Frank! How's that Atlas 10 D coming along?

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                  • #10

                    Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                    At the dismantling and cleaning stage and sourcing replacement parts that were either missing, broken or brazed. Just found a motor mount for the vertical countershaft tonight and they are hard to find. Biggest issue is no documentation for the Atlas 10D and the 10E & 10F parts list on OWWM have some subtle differences!

                    Using a Soy based paint remover that LV were selling before their latest iteration and it works a treat at getting the old paint off. How do you handle repainting at this time of year? See LV sell a couple of tents for spray paint and was wondering if that is how you do it?

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                    • #11

                      Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                      I have a radial arm saw set up with a brass wire brush and a buffer with a sandpaper wheel on one end and a deburring wheel on the other. Between the 3 I manage to get most of the old paint off. For painting I like Dulpi-color automotive primer and Dupli-color engine enamel rattle cans. They are available at Lordco and if you tell them that you are a senior you get contractor rates. I’ve got a portable heater that I use, in fact I just dragged it out today.


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                      • #12

                        Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                        Thanks Rory, good hint on the paint. Used the Home Depot rattle cans for the old Delta belt/disc sander but will visit Lordco. Have a 220v heater so can use that and carefully tarp the garage workshop for overspray.

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                        • #13

                          Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                          if the paint is stuck and not all cracked up or falling off, I'd just wash it with soap and water and then acetone. Keep in mind it will surely be leaded paint so if you make it into dust it's probably not great for you. the way I see it you won't find better primer than the original factory paint.

                          if It's cold out Id get it warm inside and then take it out and spray it before it cools, rather than bringing it in the house and off-gassing yourself maybe a big cardboard box with a car heater stuck in with the part for a while. set it far away from anything else flammable just in case..

                          I don't think paint bonds well on cold metal so I usually want the metal to be warm while it is painted at least. I used to prime stuff more , with car parts I'd use epoxy primer to prevent rusting again. I've been just using the rustoleum spray cans with out a primer and haven't seen much issue with omitting the primer. if you had a lot of chips to hide then maybe a primer would give you more to sand, normally I just do a light sanding between coats and let dry overnight. if you spray over a partly dry coat the it can all bubble up and that's a mess. the previous coat needs to finish offgassing before another coat unless it is still fresh and wet enough to combine. I can get away with some oil finishes inside but if I break out that stuff I have a war on my hands ;-) it really stinks. something like a doghouse or an old car might work to just keep some heat around it with out making you go nuts in the house with the fumes. the heater could possibly spark off the paint fumes I guess so consider that too.

                          usually I like to do a fairly light coat and let it tack up a few minutes and then do a heavier coat to try to make it smooth out. if I wait too long or load too much then the bubbling up issue can happen.

                          If you really want the paint off and its rusty and if you don't want to make it dust then you might try a car battery, some borax mixed in water, a plastic box and a hunk of iron. let the part bubble and the paint and rust will leave it. connect your cables to the part and the hunk of iron, if you get them the right way the part will bubble if they are the wrong way it will be bubbling the iron hunk. if it's not rusty and just painted it might work you could try. usually I will remove the part and clean it a bit in between to keep it going for a while. I'd rather let stuff sit in that than make too much dust and it's easier. normally I'd do that to get rid of rust and not paint but I have noticed that usually the paint comes right off too. If you like cleaning machine parts up you can experiment , its cheap to try at least and not too stinky. you can try a charger or a battery just be careful to not short it out.

                          Last edited by stickman; 11-19-2021, 03:03 PM.

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                          • #14

                            Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                            These non abrasive techniques produce a bunch of toxic sludge. I am interested to know how you handle it. Thanks


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                            • #15

                              Re: Atlas Workshop Drillpress

                              Using a bio degradable product called SOY.GEL Paint Stripper by Fran Mar. Believe it was purchased from LV a couple of years ago. It is a thick gel you slather on and leave. It softens the old paint and just wipe the mess off with a rag. Give it a spritz with water and dry with air before wire wheeling. Brings you down to bare metal. Will wipe Acetone onto the metal prior to painting to clean. No sanding dust as maybe a little rust to wire wheel. Good tip on heating the items before spray painting. Might put everything back together then leave actual painting until next summer when it can be done outside.

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