Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

    This bowl is made using the single board and matching grain technique. I chose to make two bowls from the board so there would be minimal waste. By marking the board on one side with different markings on each edge it was easy to match up the segments later to get the matching grain. Note this board was a cull from a previous project. Although it had nice figure the color was not good throughout the board. The result was somewhat interesting and perhaps a keeper for some people.

    The miter saw was set to 15 degrees and after each cut the board was flipped and cut again. The stop setup ensured each piece was exactly the same length. I made 24 pieces from the board which was 42 inches long by 5 wide and 1 inch thick.

    The following pictures tell the story of how the bowl blank was assembled and cut. Then it was glued up into a bowl blank and turned.

    Of course there are some limitations to the form you can achieve with this method but I pushed it to the maximum this time to get the form I wanted. Generally you end up with a 45 degree slope unless you make an effort to change that result. I drew the general shape I wanted on a piece of paper in order to lay out the angles I needed to get the form I wanted. It worked out fairly close so I was happy with the result.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentCutting01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	64.8 KB
ID:	924287

    After The 24 pieces were cut 12 matching pieces were test clamped to check the fit
    Click image for larger version

Name:	TestClampAndTapeup01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	87.3 KB
ID:	924283
    The fit was adjusted using shims along the center line and taped in place with packing tape. Then removed from the clamp and opened at the back to apply the glue.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SetmentGlueUp01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	74.9 KB
ID:	924284
    The glued pieces were placed back in the clamp with the same shims and clamped tightly
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentClampUp01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	79.0 KB
ID:	924285
    A simple diagram was used to determine the angles to cut out the segment pieces, but don't reduce the angles for cuts 2 and 3 as much as the diagram suggests. Don't go much below 45 degrees or you will not leave enough wall thickness.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	AngelCutLayout01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	53.5 KB
ID:	924286
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentAngleCutting01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	73.9 KB
ID:	924282
    The maximum angle was use on the first cut and reduced for each subsequent cut.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentCuttingDone01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	80.9 KB
ID:	924288
    The half circles were then glued together and stacked into the bowl blank. You need to carefully flatten each round segment before you do the final assembly. I used my drum sander for that.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentAssembly01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	78.1 KB
ID:	924289
    When placed on the lathe the outside was smoothed first
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SegmentAssemblyGlueUp.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	77.1 KB
ID:	924290
    It is much easier to turn the bowl as the grain is constant all around. The sanding is easier as well for the same reason.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	TurningDone01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	83.7 KB
ID:	924291

    Pictures of the first coat of finish in the next panel

    E.G.
    Last edited by Lost in the Woods; 01-16-2009, 08:15 PM.
    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

    Last Two pictures:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	TurningFinishCoat01.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	73.5 KB
ID:	846128

    Click image for larger version

Name:	TurningFinishCoat02.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	64.1 KB
ID:	846129
    The first coat of oil helps enhance the figure significantly.

    Those who didn't know how should now be able to do this as well.

    E.G.

    P.S. The bowl finished up at 11 5/8 by 4
    Last edited by Edward G. Burlington; 09-21-2007, 11:27 PM.
    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

      Originally posted by Kerry in Fort Sask, AB
      Thanks Ed, that explained it very well.

      But I almost cried when I saw you cutting up that nice piece of tiger maple.....:cry:

      Thanks again,
      Kerry
      Kerry: As you can see this piece had a lot of silver in it and I could not use it on flat work but it added some interest in this case. I have a little more of it so maybe I will make some more bowls if anyone requests one.

      E.G.
      You stop learning the instant you start talking...
      And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

        Originally posted by Chris B
        Hi Ed,

        That's a great post with excellent photography and a very clear description of the process. I love and use a lot of tiger maple and am inspired to give this technique a try. While I've done some segemented turning, I've not tried this particular method. One question; why the hole in the center of the glue up later pluged by a dowel?
        The hole naturally develops because the points break off easily so I drill it out to a round hole. The dowel fills the hole temporarily to allow me to use a compass (place to put the point) to draw circular the lines to follow on the band saw.

        The hole is later (after final assembly) drilled out a bit larger for a plug.

        This method is very efficient with wood but somewhat limiting is form.

        Thanks for your comments.

        E.G.
        You stop learning the instant you start talking...
        And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Segmented Bowl From A Single Board & Grain Matching Technique

          After some review I have decided to emphasize the care needed to line up and center each segment during final assembly. The material left after turning can be too thin if the pieces are not carefully centered. In addition if you embellish the process with contrasting woods it is even more important to get accurate stacking and centering. Be sure the segments are flat close to round and well centered then everything will work out fine. Depending on the thickness of the wood you should be able to get about 1 inch of wall thickness before beginning to turn.

          The pieces below are examples of enhancing the method with contrasting wood and as you can see the top edge needs to be very close to concentric if the rim is to come out evenly. Otherwise additional alternate colored segments will need to be added after the edge is machined clean.


          E.G.
          Last edited by Edward G. Burlington; 09-25-2007, 05:33 AM.
          You stop learning the instant you start talking...
          And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

          Comment

          Working...
          X