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  • Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

    Bracket Feet according to Ted:

    As part of a project to build two night stands for a friend, I decided to improve my old bracket foot jig. The main addition was an extension beyond the vertical support to assist in holding the jig at 90 degrees to the saw table. Previously the downward cutting thrust tended to pull the jig out of alignment which required constant attention. The new jig has fingers that extend past the blade so now the thrust tends to hold the base flat against the saw table. This allows more attention to following the appropriate profile and avoiding cutting yourself on the rather lengthy exposed blade. I also added two vertical dowels part way through the testing which added additional blade protection. Here is a picture of the jig. In order to use this method your band saw it needs to allow this jig with the piece to pass under the guide blocks. Therefore you can only make these feet as wide as the saw has vertical clearance. These feet are 8 inches wide and 4 inches high.

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    As you can see it is simple to build (I use an old test DT corner) with a dado joint to a support board as a base and a wooden corner bracket. The front is sawed out to give the clearance needed for the blade leaving two fingers which provide the support described above. The fingers should project about 2 or 3 inches beyond the front support.

    To make the feet I started with 8 pieces of ¾ by 4 inch by 17 inches long. I glued them together to create 4 pieces 1 1/2 by 4 by 17 inches. After drying I cut them in half and mitered them at 45 degrees. I kept the pieces together and matched (see them marked with x) so the grain in the corners would match properly. Then I laid out the profile and drilled 1 1/8 holes in all the pieces. I then sawed the profile and glued the corners with a ½ inch spline for added strength.
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    Once the corner has dried the shape can be cut on the band saw using the new jig. There is room to screw the piece to the jig from below to ensure it does not move while being cut. This jig made it much easier to concentrate on cutting because it was very stable and the added dowels helped to keep fingers away from the blade.

    The first cut was made following the pencil line and it was easier to do because the profile was cut first which remove much of the wood before this cut was done.
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    The second cut was made after flipping the piece over then following the corner profile made by the first cut. Be sure to screw it down to the jig again before proceeding. If you follow this outline carefully you end up with a perfect corner joint requiring just a little smoothing to finish.
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    I put an inflatable sanding drum in the lathe and used it to smooth the piece ready for hand sanding. This can also be done with a Random Orbit Sander as well.
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    I will post the completed project so you can see the final result in a month or so.

    E.G.
    Last edited by Lost in the Woods; 01-16-2009, 10:04 PM.
    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

  • #2

    Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

    After using it a while I felt that the dowels would help protect your fingers by providing a limit to where you should put your hand. If you grab the jig by the bottom they provide interference should you move you hand while watching the cut at the top. Since the blade is open as it passes through the foot and has cleared the cut away part of the foot it is exposed and somewhat dangerous. Just a little safer to use that way.

    Note this issue in the second picture of the cutting sequence.

    Here is a picture with the foot in place. The posts do not get in the way at all and provide a safe reference for your hands in particular the area where the blade is open near the lower part of the foot.
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    E.G.
    Last edited by Lost in the Woods; 01-16-2009, 10:08 PM.
    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

      I see your point, Consentration on the cutting line often forgets about other goings-on... Tis good to have something to feel and remind you of the approaching dangers. That was the only logical thing I could think of, for their presence.
      Bill "Hickory" Simpson

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

        Edward, I always enjoy your work; style, quality and execution.. it's great and your posts are most instructional. I am wishing that we archived more of this sort of thing.
        Now a question for you, and others if they pipe in, wrt precision and miters. Since much of your work exhibits precision such as the feet shown in this thread, it needs to be flawless. Mack C and I were talking a bit about accuracy and ways to improve it since we've both made a bunch of boxes and the like over the last while where "close" doesn't cut it. I normally cut my miters on the TS, now with the benefit of my new Wixey bevel gauge, where he has taken to chamfer bit on the router table with great success... dead on accurate. Do you use both methods or have a preference?

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

          First thanks to everyone for their observations and comments. I like to share ideas like this particularly when it simplifies and adds safety to a project process. Hopefully some of you will give this a try some day.

          Originally posted by Rolf In Burlington
          I still can't believe Ted is actually working on that work of art he calls a bench....


          Rolf: I have already shed a tear for the first dent and moved on. I am very pleased with everything about the bench and truly enjoying all the clamping options. I am sure there will be some things I would change next time but nothing yet. This project is the first one not related to the construction of the bench itself. I really enjoyed the spirit of your question even though I gave you a straight answer.

          Originally posted by Rick Thom View Post
          Now a question for you, and others if they pipe in, wrt precision and miters. Since much of your work exhibits precision such as the feet shown in this thread, it needs to be flawless. Mack C and I were talking a bit about accuracy and ways to improve it since we've both made a bunch of boxes and the like over the last while where "close" doesn't cut it. I normally cut my miters on the TS, now with the benefit of my new Wixey bevel gauge, where he has taken to chamfer bit on the router table with great success... dead on accurate. Do you use both methods or have a preference?


          Rick: As much as I enjoy complements particularly from my peers I would like to assure you I am quite ordinary in the woodworking skills arena. Like all of you I have my strengths and weaknesses. At my age I am now able to exploit my strengths and ignore my weakness (to old to change them). So what I do (and enjoy) is sharing the fruits of my creative ideas. I never look at any woodworking process without asking myself “How could it be done better or easier”. My strength is my creative imagination and many years of working with my hands in several trades (i.e. made more mistakes than most). My weaknesses are too numerous to mention but I know how to work around most of them (my soap box still gets me in trouble sometimes).

          The answer to you question might prove the point. I have tried many ways to get perfect cuts. I have bought all the best tools I can find and it turns out they all work as well as you work them. So now I have tuned my CMS to the point it gives me what I want and I re-check it regularly. The TS together with a jig or two will do just as well. It comes down to discovering a process that works for you or fits the current requirements the best.

          I wish I could give you the definitive solution but if there was one you would already be using it.

          Regards;

          E.G.
          You stop learning the instant you start talking...
          And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

            Thanks Ed!

            Great jig Edward and thanks for sharing it.

            And regarding your latest post: I am sure many (including myself) don't consider your works amature. Beginners like me benefit a lot from masters like you on these forums. So thank you!

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            • #7

              Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

              very nice jig Edward
              thanks for sharing
              what would you suggest for sanding for somebody with no lathe?
              Dara
              SPCHT

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

                You mean to tell me that this style of cabinet foot doesn't come pre-formed from the tree?

                Great jig and a very helpful tutorial. Now all I need is the band saw.
                "my hero's are all cartoon characters. What does that say for society, or for me for that matter"

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

                  I hear those of you who are band saw capasity challenged. I have an Idea :idea: ! I will post a jig that will allow you to make the 8 inch version even with a standard 14 inch bandsaw or any saw with about 5 inch resaw capasity.

                  I will post it tomorrow.

                  E.G.
                  You stop learning the instant you start talking...
                  And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

                    As promised I have illustrated how to make 8 inch bracket feet with a 5 inch re-saw capacity.

                    The construction is very similar to the version above except the corner section is limited to 5 inches and an extension is added afterward. The extension is then planed by hand to match the profile of the corner after glue-up. I have used some scraps of oak to demonstrate this process but if a single piece of oak is used for the outer facing section of each foot, the joint to the extension would likely be nearly invisable. Alternatively you could make the joint curved as illustrated in the layout. I would then lower the profile of the extension about 1/8 inch to emphasize the joint. If you can't hide it emphasize it!



                    Hope it is helpful

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                    E.G.

                    P.S. Note that I added a picture of the underside of support platform to show how screws are used to hold the foot in place while cutting the profile.
                    Last edited by Edward G. Burlington; 04-20-2007, 10:20 PM.
                    You stop learning the instant you start talking...
                    And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Bracket Feet Construction & BF Jig

                      Originally posted by Dara View Post
                      very nice jig Edward
                      thanks for sharing
                      what would you suggest for sanding for somebody with no lathe?
                      Dara: You can use a Random Orbit Sander, a plane and scraper, or make a sanding block from a cutoff.

                      E.G.
                      You stop learning the instant you start talking...
                      And start again when you stop thinking how smart you are.

                      Comment

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