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  • Type of Sprayer

    I am looking at purchasing a sprayer to spray stains as well as paint both acrylic and latex. I am looking for advice on the type of sprayer that would work the best??
    Obviously I am looking at a HVLP unit but should I buy a totally enclosed unit or a spray gun to work off of an air compressor? Should it be a gravity unit?

    Looking for advice from you experienced woodworkers out there?
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  • #2

    Re: Type of Sprayer

    If you already have a good compressor, suitably large enough, then buying a gun to use for the compressor will be cheaper. But if you don't have a compressor, a standalone HVLP will cost less.

    Spraying thick materials like household paint is a challenge for gravity guns - hard to get sufficient material flow without thinning the paint excessively. It can be done but you might want to consider a gun with a pressure cup if that's something you'll do regularly.
    Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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    • #3

      Re: Type of Sprayer

      I have had very good luck with a Fuji minimite 4 with a pressurized gravity cup. Certain water borne paints do not spray well, whether thinned with water or with Floetrol.

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      • #4

        Re: Type of Sprayer

        IMHO, if you want to spray paint and get good results, get an airless.
        It's what they are designed for, and on the better models you can get tips etc that allow you to spray thinner stuff such as stains. Depends what you will be spraying more of I guess.
        Thinning paint to get it to flow through an underpowerd system is a disaster in the making IMO

        Paul

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        • #5

          Re: Type of Sprayer

          I had concluded that airless was the way to go but I am looking for something a bit less expensive than Fuji and Earlex. Not sure if this is possible?

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          • #6

            Re: Type of Sprayer

            As far as I know Fuji and Earlex only make turbine driven HVLP systems. These are not the same as an airless system. May I suggest you google "airless paint spraying systems".

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            • #7

              Re: Type of Sprayer

              We need some specifics in order to get you in the right direction
              You mention spraying stain. Are you staining furniture/cabinets or a fence/deck. Either way let us know the product you intend to work with.
              Spraying Latex paint. Again are you paint walls or cabinets/furniture. Latex can be spray with something other than airless but needs to be thinned to make it work. Often you are better to go with a product designed to be sprayed.
              Spraying stain and spraying Latex are both sprayed but are very different products and need to be applied differently.
              You mention some thing priced below Earlex, what is your budget?
              Mark
              www.masterfinishing.ca

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              • #8

                Re: Type of Sprayer

                I agree with Paul that we need more info on your requirements, as there's a huge difference between applying stain and applying paint.

                For example, if you're spraying mostly low viscosity (what most call "thin") finishes such as the stain you mention, or any of the usual waterborne products (examples are Target Coating's sander/sealer, lacquer, varnish or polyurethane) most here on this forum are wanting to apply, then HVLP systems will work just fine. However, the very high viscosity (what most call "thick") finishes such as latex paint cannot be effectively atomized by HVLP systems without thinning by 25% with water then adding Floetrol to get back some of the leveling out characteristics that were lost when it was thinned out. Even then you've dramatically altered the chemistry the paint manufacturer engineered in the product and cannot therefore expect results to be anywhere close to what you'll get with a simple roller or brush. Just to reinforce this issue of spraying latex paint, even Fuji, who as far as I'm concerned makes the best HVLP turbine systems on the market today, recommends against HVLP for that application. They'll recommend you rent a unit from one of the big box stores, which is designed specifically for spraying house paint.

                Hope ths helps, but again, let us know what percentage of type of finish you're planning to apply, as well as the price range you're looking at, and then we can give you some more specific recommendations.
                Last edited by MartyFromKingston; 04-21-2017, 06:42 AM.
                marpy p likes this.
                All the best,

                Marty

                President of Kingston Wood Artisans (formerly Kingston Woodworkers Ass'n) Website: https://kwoodartca.wordpress.com/
                & member of the Kingston Woodturners Association

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                • #9

                  Re: Type of Sprayer

                  Thanks Marty, this really explains the information that I required to make my decision.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Type of Sprayer

                    I've been spraying various finishes on furniture for almost 20 years using several different HVLP conversion guns driven by my compressor. I have had good luck spraying acrylic paints with some thinning (maybe 10-20%) without requiring any other additives. For spraying paint, I am using a gravity feed gun with a 2.2mm tip (Asturomec 9011 HVLP). I would not want to paint a house or even a room, but I have sprayed doors, dressers, shutters, several hundred feet of trim along with the items shown in the attached photos.

                    When choosing paint, I look for something with lower viscosity since that requires less thinning. The latest dresser that I painted was done with an Insl-X urethane acrylic paint called cabinet-coat and it produced a beautiful finish. The multi-colour benches in one of the photos were done with General Finishes milk paint from Jeff at WoodEssence (http://www.woodessence.com/General-F...-P4364C64.aspx) and then top coated with General Finishes Enduro-poly. Note that this is really an acrylic paint rather than a milk paint. You can also check out my article in issue #103 (Aug/Sept 2016) of CWHI to see some photos of a bench I sprayed with the same yellow milk paint.

                    For spraying poly, I use a Walcom SLIM HVLP gravity feed gun with either a 1.7mm or a 1.9mm tip. (http://www.woodessence.com/Walcom-SL...n-P104C54.aspx)

                    For spraying shellac or thin stains, I use a Walcom detail gun with a 1.2mm tip.

                    If I was starting over, I would just buy the Walcom SLIM gun with a 2.2mm tip for paints, a 1.9mm tip for poly and a 1.3mm tip for shellac and stains.

                    Good luck with your decision,
                    David

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