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Advice on my Table finish

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  • Advice on my Table finish

    So this picture shows 5 coats of Targets EM2000.

    I figured after a few coats it would go away but it has not. Wherever there is a tiny knot or imperfection it seems the finish won’t coat it. Now a have a few of these “Wells”.

    do I leave it or is there a trick to getting rid of them?

    Click image for larger version

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    Click image for larger version

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  • #2

    Re: Advice on my Table finish

    really no experience to offer, however if the holes are very small, could a few small drops of SuperGlue be applied?

    fill the void with SG, allow to dry, and then apply the finish.

    providing the glue stays below the surface (concave opposed to convex/proud) then the finish will have something to build up upon.
    [insert something witty here]

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    • #3

      Re: Advice on my Table finish

      Peter, simplest approach is to use a small dropper and drip some of the EM2000 into the void. I have found it best to do several applications and build up the finish. If you get air bubbles just prick with a pin or toothpick. I usually build up until there is a slight positive feature, then when fully dried (I usually leave for 48hrs with a fan very gently wafting over it) sand it back along with the rest of the top and apply a final coat. Sometimes it helps to dilute the finish. This seems to lower the effects of surface tension and lessen the frustration from sags, settling and air bubbles.

      You could also get creative and make the fill a "feature" by adding some darker dye to it in a ratio that will match any other knots/blemishes etc in the wood. This also has the added bonus that should the fill develop a "ring" around the outer edge, or even sag slightly, it looks perfectly normal for solid wood. This has worked for me on more than a few occasions when that "Oh S**t" moment rears it's ugly head lol

      There are other methods, like clear fill sticks or clear grain fillers (AquaCoat as I mentioned in another post).

      As an aside, I would seriously sand back your EM2000 as I think 5 coats, unless they were super thin, is getting into the realm of the dreaded "blue haze effect". FWIW I don't apply more than 3.

      Good luck
      Paul
      Last edited by Paul O in Paris; 12-21-2018, 03:17 PM.
      Egon and Wally in Calgary like this.

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      • #4

        Re: Advice on my Table finish

        Thanks Paul. I figured it being a kitchen table for 3 young boys 5 was better.

        I’ll try the dropper approach.

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        • #5

          Re: Advice on my Table finish

          When would the blue haze effect start to show? It seems clear now.

          These holes are very small and I think an eye drop would be too much. I might try to use the end of a toothpick to drop some in.

          Would it be terrible to just leave it? I was hoping to set it up for Xmas eve celebrations.

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          • #6

            Re: Advice on my Table finish

            Peter, in my experiences with waterbased, the blue haze usually appears within the first 20min to 24hr. Having said that the main variables seem to be applying coats that are too thick, applying one coat on a previous one before it has had time to dry all the way through (not just at the surface) and applying waterbased directly over an oil or solvent based stain/dye/sealer which hasn't cured completely. Any combination of these will also bring on the haze.
            I have found that EM2000 is much less prone to this phenomenon than many other clear waterbased finishes, but I have managed to produce it on a few occasions, usually when rushing to get a job finished.
            The key to avoiding it IMO is thin coats and letting them dry sufficiently, which is where a fan comes in handy once the top surface has skinned over.

            A toothpick or a pin will work for small holes, and would be easier to apply, with less drying time, than a dropper.
            Leaving the holes or filling them is a personal decision, which is influenced by the factors surrounding your schedule, preferences and tolerance level. On a rustic piece I might leave them as "character", on a conference room table or high end desk I would definitely fill them.

            From your build thread the table looks really good and like Brian I do like the contrast between wood top and white legs. You did a great job. What's next lol?

            Paul

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            • #7

              Re: Advice on my Table finish

              Thx Paul. I think I’ll leave it, adds character.

              one thing I noticed is that if a sweating glass is left on the table I get the white ring where the glass was sitting. It goes away but is disconcerting. I hope it’s not a permanent feature but will go away as the finish cures more.

              next, hmmmm. I’d love to build a bench and some maloof chairs. Not sure if it will ever happen.

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              • #8

                Re: Advice on my Table finish

                Peter, Target's TDS says final cure takes place after 150hr at 70*F (bottom of last page) so given time the blushing should cease to be a problem. Your table may take longer due to the number of coats applied. Just keep it warm and use coasters to be on the safe side.

                https://www.targetcoatings.com/wp-co..._EM2000_R3.pdf

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                • #9

                  Re: Advice on my Table finish

                  I must have read it wrong. I thought chemical cure is finished after 150 hrs. We are using Place Matt’s for. Ow.

                  thanks everyone for your help.

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                  • #10

                    Re: Advice on my Table finish

                    Peter, you read it right. I have always thought once the chemicals in the carrier had all done their thing, there was nothing left for any moisture to react with. After that, there's a time period for physical hardening of the resins. Just to be safe, I always gave any piece finished with EM2000 14 days before delivery, shorter if I had added CL100.

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