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  • Refinishing Old Table Top

    I am refinishing old table top.
    Top is some kind of veneer. Not sure what kind of wood.
    After I sanded down to #220, sprayed first coat of Oil base Varathane Professional Clear Finish.
    It opened pour but I thought it was going to be smooth after 2-3 coats.
    So far applied 4 coats, but it looks still rough and same as first coat.
    I am not sure what to do now.
    Attached pics are right after 4th coat.
    Appricate if you can give me some advice.

    Thanks.

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  • #2

    Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

    I've never sprayed a finish, but the last table tops/counters I've done, I sanded to 320. Wipe on oil, and gentle buff between coats.


    did you wet/raise the grain before the final sanding?
    are you sanding between coats?
    [insert something witty here]

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

      Looks like oak, which is notorious for open pores which makes getting a smooth finish more work than say maple.
      From the pics it looks like the finish is bridging the open grain rather than filling it. Also looks like there is solvent pop (air bubbles) in the finish.
      As you have 4 coats on already there are a couple options IMO, either strip the finish off or aggressively sand back almost to the veneer and see what you have. Also, turn the air down on the gun until you get a nice even, "soft" spray pattern.
      It's always a good idea to apply a sealer to open grained wood such as oak and sand it back, apply again etc until the pores are almost filled. If you don't have, or don't want to buy, a sealer, dilute some of the poly 50/50 with mineral spirits and spray that on in a light coat, let dry, scuff back and repeat. When you are happy with the results, apply the final coats. It's often a good idea to dilute the first coat with 25% mineral spirits, then next coat at 10% to help with flow out/levelling. As it's poly, lightly scuff between coats with 320 or 400 grit to get rid of any small irregularities and, more importantly, provide a surface for the next coat to bond to.
      You could also look for some clear grain fillers that are compatible with oil based poly, sand back and apply, then proceed with finishing when the filler is fully dried.
      Hope that helps
      Paul

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

        Thank you guys for your post.

        Yes, I wet it with mineral spirits then sanded with #220 after dried.
        and scuff sanded between coats with #600.

        Paul,
        Actually I don't see air bubbles.
        I was hoping that there is a solution without sanding off the finishes I applied. Because I can see the material under the veneer is coming out on some spot.
        But I may have to do it.
        So if I dilute with mineral spirits, I don't need sealer or grain filler then?

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

          looks like silicone contamination
          sigpic
          hobby woodworking since 1972

          Comment


          • #6

            Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

            Originally posted by koo1010 View Post
            So if I dilute with mineral spirits, I don't need sealer or grain filler then?
            Maybe! Oak has deep grain and can give problems when you least expect them due to small amounts of air or contaminants (silicone from Pledge or similar "furniture enhancers") being trapped in the pores.
            Like I said previously, you could sand back and see what it looks like. However if the veneer is wearing down in some spots sanding will have to be super light in those areas.
            FWIW if I was doing this I would use a chemical stripper to remove the finish paying particular attention to getting it out of the pores, then I would apply a grain filler, seal it and topcoat. I would go this route simply because it removes a lot of potential problems and "redoes", to say nothing of frustration (we've all been there).
            In a previous thread I mentioned AquaCoat which is a clear grain filler. I am not sure if this product is compatible with oil based poly, especially as the label says it can be applied over waterbased sealer or dewaxed shellac. IMO this would be the simplest solution for you IF it's compatible. Maybe contact the manufacturer to find out or search for a similar product that will work with your chosen finish.

            Paul




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            • #7

              Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

              I made an oak table and had it sprayed professionally, I wanted to keep the grain visible as in be able to see the texture of the open pores as to my mind that is what oak is about and not just a flat finish, the guy who did it for me said the trick was to give it a light coat of thinned product to seal it all then one final coat, I wanted a non gloss as in satin finish and it has turned out perfect, the product was a thinners based product not turps or water based so it is a hard wearing surface, it has been about 7 years now and is still all good considering it gets used every day.
              Seems I don't have photos of the table with its finish on, not a lot of help hey.

              Comment


              • #8

                Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                Bob, with the addition of “hey” at the end of your reply, you are fully qualified as an honorary member of this Canadian w’working community! Roy
                Are you solving the problem, or becoming part of it?

                Comment


                • #9

                  Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                  Originally posted by Roy in Thunder Bay View Post
                  Bob, with the addition of “hey” at the end of your reply, you are fully qualified as an honorary member of this Canadian w’working community! Roy
                  Now That is Nice at the start of 2019, Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10

                    Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                    Thank you guys for your post.


                    Originally posted by Paul O in Paris View Post


                    In a previous thread I mentioned AquaCoat which is a clear grain filler. I am not sure if this product is compatible with oil based poly, especially as the label says it can be applied over waterbased sealer or dewaxed shellac. IMO this would be the simplest solution for you IF it's compatible. Maybe contact the manufacturer to find out or search for a similar product that will work with your chosen finish.




                    I checked AquaCoat web-site and it says "The filler sticks to raw wood or any type of finish and can be applied between coats instead of all at once." I will e-mail them and ask about it.
                    I hope I can use this as it looks like the simplest solution.

                    Thanks again.

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                      It looks like it could possibly be teak veneer with solid edge.
                      If so, varathane is not the best finish for teak.
                      There various ways to finish teak, but the finish you have on now would need to be removed.

                      Comment

                      • Thread Continues Below...

                      • #12

                        Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                        Originally posted by freestyle View Post
                        It looks like it could possibly be teak veneer with solid edge.
                        If so, varathane is not the best finish for teak.
                        There various ways to finish teak, but the finish you have on now would need to be removed.
                        It could be right. I was thinking this is not oak but something else.
                        Curious to know how you would do it . If you don't mind tell me.

                        thanks for your post.

                        Comment


                        • #13

                          Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                          I like oil best on teak and have cleaned up several vintage teak veneer pieces I've acquired over the years.

                          OOO steel wool with howard restor-a-finish, then boiled linseed oil, and buffing works well and it's pretty easy.

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                            I think it's Oak and I think that mostly because of the open grain. OP mentions sanding to 220. If it were Teak I would not expect that open grain after 220.

                            The finish is just way too heavy which accentuates and increases the open grain.
                            "Do it Right!"

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Re: Refinishing Old Table Top

                              Thank you guys for your post.

                              I talked to Acua Coat guy and he recommended to use wax free shellac before Acua Coat.
                              Now I am searching for shellac now.


                              Thanks.

                              Comment

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