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Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

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  • #16

    Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

    Originally posted by earl of vincent View Post
    UPDATE -
    Sealing with de-waxed shellac was essential. I did 3 coats but in my final sanding before pouring the first flood of epoxy, i sanded one small 2" spot too deep. That little spot wasn't sealed well and that's the one spot I had bubbles in my epoxy. A little butane creme brulee torch took care of the bubbles nicely. i'm pouring my second and final flood coat this weekend. i'll post pics of the finished product once i assemble and attach the legs.
    I just levelled the slab with a router sled. Parts had fairly sizeable voids and even some tear out in the section to the right hand side of this picture. I sealed up the backside of voids that went through the slab and filled them with my epoxy resin. Also used some rot fix to harden some very soft sections on the right side.

    Sanded to 220, did a seal coat of epoxy resin using a bondo spatula to spread it out...then my flood coat. Spent a good hour or better bursting bubbles with my propane torch because my seal coat still had a number of holes in it. Biggest lesson I learned was to make sure my seal coat sealed everything good. Click image for larger version

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    • #17

      Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

      What did/will that become, Randy?

      Noel
      "Being so impressed with the beauty of nature, I never cease to be amazed at how the
      'touch of the human hand' can transform it into another kind of beauty that is so uniquely human.
      "
      John Snow, Outdoorsman and Retired Teacher

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      • #18

        Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

        Originally posted by Woodwreck View Post

        YIKES! Where on earth did all these macabre steps come from? Miniwax Wood Hardener yellow can. Whatever the relevance, I'm an hour or two from you and all that "great advice" scares the crap out of me. Just brush it on, it is a solvent in nature, dries in 8 minutes, normal room temp. Period.

        https://www.google.com/search?source...31.v8WzQ9jvoMg
        Ha! I didn't even know wood hardener was a thing. Steve, it seems like I can use that on redwood or monterey cypress and turn that softwood into something that mimics a hardwood in strength. i was thinking of making a monterey cypress kitchen table, but i was worried about the softness. I think that wood hardener would do the trick. what do you think?

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        • #19

          Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

          Originally posted by earl of vincent View Post

          Ha! I didn't even know wood hardener was a thing. Steve, it seems like I can use that on redwood or monterey cypress and turn that softwood into something that mimics a hardwood in strength. i was thinking of making a monterey cypress kitchen table, but i was worried about the softness. I think that wood hardener would do the trick. what do you think?
          It is not intended as a surface primer area sorta thing. I have and am currently using it on appreciable redwood architecturally decorative, unprotected, exterior house beams, after cleaning out dry rot (40 years old) on the exposed edges. In this case it is then filled with a build up of product to recast the beam and paint.

          In your case, I intended the link for use on edges, small cavities and so forth. As always you should first test it on scrap material for a complete test.
          earl of vincent likes this.
          Start slow; wind down gracefuilly

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          • #20

            Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

            Originally posted by Woodwreck View Post

            It is not intended as a surface primer area sorta thing. I have and am currently using it on appreciable redwood architecturally decorative, unprotected, exterior house beams, after cleaning out dry rot (40 years old) on the exposed edges. In this case it is then filled with a build up of product to recast the beam and paint.

            In your case, I intended the link for use on edges, small cavities and so forth. As always you should first test it on scrap material for a complete test.
            Yes, I agree with Woodrech;n...its not a surface primer. It's more of just a surface wood hardener. The area between the two voids on the right hand side of that slab were pretty soft/punky. Also the top right section was soft but not as bad, but I could push my fingernail into parts these sections pretty easy. I used RotFix which is just a very thin epoxy on those sections first. I actually put Rotfix on the back and drilled into it to see how much penetration I was getting. In the really soft areas it was penetrating close to 1/4"....less soft areas maybe 1/8 or less. So it just hardens the surface part.

            Thing that I liked was how much tear out and stuff that would have taken me sanding down 1/8th or so that the epoxy covered/ leveled and actually hid. Wouldn't know that this thing wasn't dead flat with no voids/uneveness. My goodness the flood coat of epoxy fills and hides a lot more than poly or lacquer can.

            Noel, that is my dining room table now. About 6' long and 4' ish wide.
            Last edited by Randydb; 02-11-2019, 06:51 PM.

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            • #21

              Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

              Originally posted by Randydb View Post

              I just levelled the slab with a router sled. Parts had fairly sizeable voids and even some tear out in the section to the right hand side of this picture. I sealed up the backside of voids that went through the slab and filled them with my epoxy resin. Also used some rot fix to harden some very soft sections on the right side.

              .... Biggest lesson I learned was to make sure my seal coat sealed everything good. Click image for larger version

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              It should be pointed out that what you have there is not a slab or milled board, but rather, a burl. The burl is typical in Redwood trees as a knotty cross section across the roots or branched limbs. It is not homogeneous or structurally sound but therein lies its potential and beauty. It is extremely porous thus these comments not recognizing the nature.

              In 1962 (at age 20+) I picked up a 3' long piece with raw edge in the coastal redwoods and made a simplistic table for my mother living in AZ. I made the table, clueless to what I was doing, poked some ready made legs under it, slapped a finish on it, and she cherished that coffee table till the day she died 40 years later. I am sure you will find many years of enjoyment if you respect its nature and care.
              Start slow; wind down gracefuilly

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              • #22

                Re: Sealing redwood before pouring an epoxy flood

                Yes to all woodwreck says here. Mine is maple burl. I don't know how I would have finished this with any other finish. I think that was the beauty of the self levelling epoxy. I couldn't get everything flat because of the grain going in a million directions and the different sections of wood having such different qualities. Yet the self levelling epoxy everything came out flat and beautiful. Also, quite hard.

                I finished another maple slab that wasn't a burl. My sister didn't like how shiny it was. I sanded the final finish with 400 grit and put a few coats of satin Emtech em2000 waterbased varnish on. I really like the way it looked with a satin finish. I will likely do that with this table eventually.

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