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  • Rubio Monocoat

    Hi Bob,

    Hi Wayne You seem to be a fan of the Rubio Monocoat, I would like some information not put out by those trying to sell it, I am embarking on a multy wood chest of draws I want to keep the texture of the grain and enhance the colours.
    I read that it is a one coat application question 1 is "can it manage 2 coats and will it look different?
    I see there are lots of other products pushed as in cleaners / restorers have you any experience with these, is it a long term product that dosen't need constant attention?
    I don't want to derail this thread so PM me if necessary or start a new thread.
    Thanks in advance.
    I usually always apply a second application after a very light sand with a Scotchbrite pad. The second application is much quicker to lay down and uses significantly less product than the first. Much depends of the type of wood you are using but I found it takes on a fuller appearance with that second coat, let the first coat dry for one or two days before the second application. Best thing to do is make up a piece of the wood that matches the wood you intend to use and purchase the small sample bottles of the clear or whatever tint you want. That way you will know for sure what your getting. I always do this for new types of wood or if it involves a tint I’m unfamiliar with. The small bottles are not expensive.

    The raw wood cleaner is not required but I always use it because it does get a lot of dust left on after vacuuming. I do this just before applying the finish, one tin goes a long way. I use restorer for my floors but unless the furniture piece gets harsh treatment it should be fine for years.

    Try to only purchase what you intend to use, it does skim over and won’t last forever but it goes a long way if used correctly. I use Scotchbrite to apply the first coat and a cotton rag for the second.

    Feel free to ask away if you have any more questions.

    Wayne
  • Thread Continues Below...

  • #2

    Re: Rubio Monocoat

    Originally posted by bkrits View Post

    Hi Wayne You seem to be a fan of the Rubio Monocoat, I would like some information not put out by those trying to sell it, I am embarking on a multy wood chest of draws I want to keep the texture of the grain and enhance the colours.
    I read that it is a one coat application question 1 is "can it manage 2 coats and will it look different?
    I see there are lots of other products pushed as in cleaners / restorers have you any experience with these, is it a long term product that dosen't need constant attention?
    I don't want to derail this thread so PM me if necessary or start a new thread.
    Thanks in advance.
    Hi Bob,

    i have had more shop time this fall than in the last 5 years combined, and i happen to love to try new things. My default finish is the Maloof type Wiped on (Tung, Poly and mineral spirits), but have sprayed WB poly and lacquers.

    There are 3 "wax-oil" blends that seem to be popular with the pros for the ease of application. Also seems to be strong supporters and detractors on social media.

    i tried Odies oil, Osmo Polyoil and Rubio monocoat.

    Odies - smells wonderful, very easy to apply, but finish failed on my table top (actually applied by a pro). Works great for cutting boards. Spread on, buff off.
    Rubio - also smells good, easy, but wasn't as impressed with the Chatoyance. Recommended to only sand to 150 grit. Spread on, buff off. Rubio also has a tinted versions, which also saves some stain work.
    Osmo - the thickest finish of the 3, closest to poly. Smells like naphtha. Roll on. Like thick poly, may capture dust and show bubbles, etc.

    For reference, i had 6 projects to complete (table, desk, bench, hutch and 2 cutting boards) in QSWO, cherry and walnut. I tried different tests on all with pigment and or dye stain (water and NGR) and various versions of each top coat. Yes, i may have a problem....


    For a dresser, i would use the Rubio or Osmo.

    I followed a similar path to Wayne - sanded the first coat with 320 and applied 2nd. Also applied their topcoat oil "maintenance oil". Read it lends to better water resistance. Likely not required for a dresser.



    Hope this helps,
    Chris

    Comment


    • #3

      Re: Rubio Monocoat

      Originally posted by chris44 View Post

      Hi Bob,

      i have had more shop time this fall than in the last 5 years combined, and i happen to love to try new things. My default finish is the Maloof type Wiped on (Tung, Poly and mineral spirits), but have sprayed WB poly and lacquers.

      There are 3 "wax-oil" blends that seem to be popular with the pros for the ease of application. Also seems to be strong supporters and detractors on social media.

      i tried Odies oil, Osmo Polyoil and Rubio monocoat.

      Odies - smells wonderful, very easy to apply, but finish failed on my table top (actually applied by a pro). Works great for cutting boards. Spread on, buff off.
      Rubio - also smells good, easy, but wasn't as impressed with the Chatoyance. Recommended to only sand to 150 grit. Spread on, buff off. Rubio also has a tinted versions, which also saves some stain work.
      Osmo - the thickest finish of the 3, closest to poly. Smells like naphtha. Roll on. Like thick poly, may capture dust and show bubbles, etc.

      For reference, i had 6 projects to complete (table, desk, bench, hutch and 2 cutting boards) in QSWO, cherry and walnut. I tried different tests on all with pigment and or dye stain (water and NGR) and various versions of each top coat. Yes, i may have a problem....


      For a dresser, i would use the Rubio or Osmo.

      I followed a similar path to Wayne - sanded the first coat with 320 and applied 2nd. Also applied their topcoat oil "maintenance oil". Read it lends to better water resistance. Likely not required for a dresser.



      Hope this helps,
      Chris
      Hi Chris
      If you look at "Chest of Draws for Wood Show" in the woodwork section you will see I have began making the draw unit I have both ends made but not cut to size yet and not for a while either so they are stored away inside the house, the mahogany veneer I have used was 3mm thick but very course grain so now I have sanded it its probably 2.5mm the texture of the grain is still visible and I would like it to remain visible to contrast the smoothness the pommele draw fronts I also want what ever finish I apply to bind / hold together the somewhat loose grain I think I would like to apply some finish very soon to protect it from getting dirty, my question is, I have some 2 part epoxy wood preservative that would bind the grain and given the length of time they will stand before I need them it will be well and truly cured, I also have some thinners based lacquer sanding sealer if I applied either of these could I then use the Rubio naturel oil at a later date. I can see the possibility of totally finishing these panels before I incorporate them into the unit.

      Comment


      • #4

        Re: Rubio Monocoat

        There was mention of tinted Rubio monocoat... but... could you use a dye on the wood prior to application? Or would that affect the adhesion?

        Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

        Comment


        • #5

          Re: Rubio Monocoat

          Originally posted by carbonBased View Post
          There was mention of tinted Rubio monocoat... but... could you use a dye on the wood prior to application? Or would that affect the adhesion?
          I don't know whether it's possible to use dyes, you can call them and ask if you don't get any further replies. I buy mine from Exotic Woods, their staff are quite knowledgeable about the product.

          Rubio Monocoat chemically alters the wood it comes into contact with, that's why its important to remove as much dust as possible prior to application and why you theoretically need only one application. Once the product comes into contact with the raw wood it does it's job (hardens the wood fibres) and providing you work it into the wood and buff the excess off properly you shouldn't need to do it again. In practice it contains oils that soak into the wood, fill the grain, can look better with multiple coats and high speed buffing off using Scotchbrite pads. Those oils take up to a month to fully cure although you can use the piece or walk on the floor within a few days without any damage.
          They have a lot of different tints to chose from.

          Wayne

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